VS.

Sence vs. Sense

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Senceadverb

(dialectal) lang=en

Sensenoun

Any of the manners by which living beings perceive the physical world: for humans sight, smell, hearing, touch, taste.

Sencepreposition

(dialectal) lang=en

Sensenoun

Perception through the intellect; apprehension; awareness.

‘a sense of security’;

Senceconjunction

(dialectal) lang=en

Sensenoun

Sound practical or moral judgment.

‘It's common sense not to put metal objects in a microwave oven.’;

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Sensenoun

The meaning, reason, or value of something.

‘You don’t make any sense.’; ‘the true sense of words or phrases’;

Sensenoun

A natural appreciation or ability.

‘A keen musical sense’;

Sensenoun

(pragmatics) The way that a referent is presented.

Sensenoun

(semantics) A single conventional use of a word; one of the entries for a word in a dictionary.

Sensenoun

(mathematics) One of two opposite directions in which a vector (especially of motion) may point. See also polarity.

Sensenoun

(mathematics) One of two opposite directions of rotation, clockwise versus anti-clockwise.

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Sensenoun

(biochemistry) referring to the strand of a nucleic acid that directly specifies the product.

Senseverb

To use biological senses: to either smell, watch, taste, hear or feel.

Senseverb

To instinctively be aware.

‘She immediately sensed her disdain.’;

Senseverb

To comprehend.

Sensenoun

A faculty, possessed by animals, of perceiving external objects by means of impressions made upon certain organs (sensory or sense organs) of the body, or of perceiving changes in the condition of the body; as, the senses of sight, smell, hearing, taste, and touch. See Muscular sense, under Muscular, and Temperature sense, under Temperature.

‘Let fancy still my sense in Lethe steep.’; ‘What surmounts the reachOf human sense I shall delineate.’; ‘The traitor Sense recallsThe soaring soul from rest.’;

Sensenoun

Perception by the sensory organs of the body; sensation; sensibility; feeling.

‘In a living creature, though never so great, the sense and the affects of any one part of the body instantly make a transcursion through the whole.’;

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Sensenoun

Perception through the intellect; apprehension; recognition; understanding; discernment; appreciation.

‘This Basilius, having the quick sense of a lover.’; ‘High disdain from sense of injured merit.’;

Sensenoun

Sound perception and reasoning; correct judgment; good mental capacity; understanding; also, that which is sound, true, or reasonable; rational meaning.

‘He raves; his words are looseAs heaps of sand, and scattering wide from sense.’;

Sensenoun

That which is felt or is held as a sentiment, view, or opinion; judgment; notion; opinion.

‘I speak my private but impartial senseWith freedom.’; ‘The municipal council of the city had ceased to speak the sense of the citizens.’;

Sensenoun

Meaning; import; signification; as, the true sense of words or phrases; the sense of a remark.

‘So they read in the book in the law of God distinctly, and gave the sense.’; ‘I think 't was in another sense.’;

Sensenoun

Moral perception or appreciation.

‘Some are so hardened in wickedness as to have no sense of the most friendly offices.’;

Sensenoun

One of two opposite directions in which a line, surface, or volume, may be supposed to be described by the motion of a point, line, or surface.

Senseverb

To perceive by the senses; to recognize.

‘Is he sure that objects are not otherwise sensed by others than they are by him?’;

Sensenoun

a general conscious awareness;

‘a sense of security’; ‘a sense of happiness’; ‘a sense of danger’; ‘a sense of self’;

Sensenoun

the meaning of a word or expression; the way in which a word or expression or situation can be interpreted;

‘the dictionary gave several senses for the word’; ‘in the best sense charity is really a duty’; ‘the signifier is linked to the signified’;

Sensenoun

the faculty through which the external world is apprehended;

‘in the dark he had to depend on touch and on his senses of smell and hearing’;

Sensenoun

sound practical judgment;

‘I can't see the sense in doing it now’; ‘he hasn't got the sense God gave little green apples’; ‘fortunately she had the good sense to run away’;

Sensenoun

a natural appreciation or ability;

‘a keen musical sense’; ‘a good sense of timing’;

Senseverb

perceive by a physical sensation, e.g., coming from the skin or muscles;

‘He felt the wind’; ‘She felt an object brushing her arm’; ‘He felt his flesh crawl’; ‘She felt the heat when she got out of the car’;

Senseverb

detect some circumstance or entity automatically;

‘This robot can sense the presence of people in the room’; ‘particle detectors sense ionization’;

Senseverb

become aware of not through the senses but instinctively;

‘I sense his hostility’;

Senseverb

comprehend;

‘I sensed the real meaning of his letter’;

Sensenoun

a faculty by which the body perceives an external stimulus; one of the faculties of sight, smell, hearing, taste, and touch

‘the bear has a keen sense of smell which enables it to hunt at dusk’;

Sensenoun

a feeling that something is the case

‘she had the sense of being a political outsider’; ‘you can improve your general health and sense of well-being’;

Sensenoun

a keen intuitive awareness of or sensitivity to the presence or importance of something

‘she had a fine sense of comic timing’;

Sensenoun

a sane and realistic attitude to situations and problems

‘he earned respect by the good sense he showed at meetings’;

Sensenoun

a reasonable or comprehensible rationale

‘I can't see the sense in leaving all the work to you’;

Sensenoun

a way in which an expression or a situation can be interpreted; a meaning

‘it is not clear which sense of the word ‘characters’ is intended in this passage’;

Sensenoun

a property (e.g. direction of motion) distinguishing a pair of objects, quantities, effects, etc. which differ only in that each is the reverse of the other

‘the cord does not become straight, but forms a length of helix in the opposite sense’;

Sensenoun

relating to or denoting a coding sequence of nucleotides, complementary to an antisense sequence.

Senseverb

perceive by a sense or senses

‘with the first frost, they could sense a change in the days’;

Senseverb

be aware of (something) without being able to define exactly how one knows

‘he could sense that he wasn't liked’; ‘she could sense her father's anger rising’;

Senseverb

(of a machine or similar device) detect

‘an optical fibre senses a current flowing in a conductor’;

Sense

A sense is a biological system used by an organism for sensation, the process of gathering information about the world and responding to stimuli. (For example, in the human body, the brain receives signals from the senses, which continuously receive information from the environment, interprets these signals, and causes the body to respond, either chemically or physically.) Although traditionally around five human senses were known (namely sight, smell, touch, taste, and hearing), it is now recognized that there are many more.

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