Speech vs. Speach - What's the difference?

Wikipedia

  • Speech

    Speech is the vocalized form of communication used by humans and some animals, which is based upon the syntactic combination of items drawn from the lexicon. Each spoken word is created out of the phonetic combination of a limited set of vowel and consonant speech sound units (phonemes). These vocabularies, the syntax that structures them, and their sets of speech sound units differ, creating many thousands of different, and mutually unintelligible, human languages. The vocal abilities that enable humans to produce speech also enable them to sing. A gestural form of human communication exists for the deaf in the form of sign language. Speech in some cultures has become the basis of written language, often one that differs in its vocabulary, syntax and phonetics from its associated spoken one, a situation called diglossia. In addition to its use in communication, it is suggested by some psychologists such as Lev Vygotsky that speech is internally used in mental processes to enhance and organize cognition in the form of an interior monologue. Speech is researched in terms of the speech production and speech perception of the sounds used in vocal language. Other research topics concern speech repetition, the ability to map heard spoken words into the vocalizations needed to recreate them, which plays a key role in vocabulary expansion in children and speech errors. Several academic disciplines study these; including acoustics, psychology, speech pathology, linguistics, cognitive science, communication studies, otolaryngology and computer science. Another area of research is how the human brain in its different areas such as the Broca's area and Wernicke's area underlies speech. It is controversial how far human speech is unique; in that animals also communicate with vocalizations. While none in the wild have comparably large vocabularies, research upon the nonverbal abilities of language trained apes such as Washoe and Kanzi raises the possibility that they might have these capabilities. The evolutionary origins of speech are unknown and subject to much debate and speculation.

  • Speach

    Speech is the vocalized form of communication used by humans and some animals, which is based upon the syntactic combination of items drawn from the lexicon. Each spoken word is created out of the phonetic combination of a limited set of vowel and consonant speech sound units (phonemes). These vocabularies, the syntax that structures them, and their sets of speech sound units differ, creating many thousands of different, and mutually unintelligible, human languages. The vocal abilities that enable humans to produce speech also enable them to sing. A gestural form of human communication exists for the deaf in the form of sign language. Speech in some cultures has become the basis of written language, often one that differs in its vocabulary, syntax and phonetics from its associated spoken one, a situation called diglossia. In addition to its use in communication, it is suggested by some psychologists such as Lev Vygotsky that speech is internally used in mental processes to enhance and organize cognition in the form of an interior monologue. Speech is researched in terms of the speech production and speech perception of the sounds used in vocal language. Other research topics concern speech repetition, the ability to map heard spoken words into the vocalizations needed to recreate them, which plays a key role in vocabulary expansion in children and speech errors. Several academic disciplines study these; including acoustics, psychology, speech pathology, linguistics, cognitive science, communication studies, otolaryngology and computer science. Another area of research is how the human brain in its different areas such as the Broca's area and Wernicke's area underlies speech. It is controversial how far human speech is unique; in that animals also communicate with vocalizations. While none in the wild have comparably large vocabularies, research upon the nonverbal abilities of language trained apes such as Washoe and Kanzi raises the possibility that they might have these capabilities. The evolutionary origins of speech are unknown and subject to much debate and speculation.

Wiktionary

  • Speech (noun)

    The faculty of uttering articulate sounds or words; the ability to speak or to use vocalizations to communicate.

    "It was hard to hear the sounds of his speech over the noise. He had a bad speech impediment."

  • Speech (noun)

    A session of speaking; a long oral message given publicly usually by one person.

    "The candidate made some ambitious promises in his campaign speech."

  • Speech (noun)

    A style of speaking.

    "Her speech was soft and lilting."

  • Speech (noun)

    Speech reported in writing; see direct speech, reported speech

  • Speech (noun)

    A dialect or language.

  • Speech (noun)

    Talk; mention; rumour.

  • Speech (verb)

    To make a speech; to harangue.

  • Speach (noun)

    obsolete form of speech

  • Speach (noun)

    misspelling of speech

Oxford Dictionary

  • Speech (noun)

    the expression of or the ability to express thoughts and feelings by articulate sounds

    "he was born deaf and without the power of speech"

  • Speech (noun)

    a person's style of speaking

    "she wouldn't accept his correction of her speech"

  • Speech (noun)

    a formal address or discourse delivered to an audience

    "he gave a speech about the company"

  • Speech (noun)

    a sequence of lines written for one character in a play

    "Antony's speech over Caesar's body"

Webster Dictionary

  • Speech (noun)

    The faculty of uttering articulate sounds or words; the faculty of expressing thoughts by words or articulate sounds; the power of speaking.

  • Speech (noun)

    he act of speaking; that which is spoken; words, as expressing ideas; language; conversation.

  • Speech (noun)

    A particular language, as distinct from others; a tongue; a dialect.

  • Speech (noun)

    Talk; mention; common saying.

  • Speech (noun)

    formal discourse in public; oration; harangue.

  • Speech (noun)

    ny declaration of thoughts.

  • Speech (verb)

    To make a speech; to harangue.

Princeton's WordNet

  • Speech (noun)

    the act of delivering a formal spoken communication to an audience;

    "he listened to an address on minor Roman poets"

  • Speech (noun)

    (language) communication by word of mouth;

    "his speech was garbled"

    "he uttered harsh language"

    "he recorded the spoken language of the streets"

  • Speech (noun)

    something spoken;

    "he could hear them uttering merry speeches"

  • Speech (noun)

    the exchange of spoken words;

    "they were perfectly comfortable together without speech"

  • Speech (noun)

    your characteristic style or manner of expressing yourself orally;

    "his manner of speaking was quite abrupt"

    "her speech was barren of southernisms"

    "I detected a slight accent in his speech"

  • Speech (noun)

    a lengthy rebuke;

    "a good lecture was my father's idea of discipline"

    "the teacher gave him a talking to"

  • Speech (noun)

    words making up the dialogue of a play;

    "the actor forgot his speech"

  • Speech (noun)

    the mental faculty or power of vocal communication;

    "language sets homo sapiens apart from all other animals"

Illustrations

Speech

Speach

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