Speech vs. Speach - What's the difference?

Speech

Speech is the vocalized form of communication used by humans and some animals, which is based upon the syntactic combination of items drawn from the lexicon. Each spoken word is created out of the phonetic combination of a limited set of vowel and consonant speech sound units (phonemes). These vocabularies, the syntax that structures them, and their sets of speech sound units differ, creating many thousands of different, and mutually unintelligible, human languages. The vocal abilities that enable humans to produce speech also enable them to sing. A gestural form of human communication exists for the deaf in the form of sign language. Speech in some cultures has become the basis of written language, often one that differs in its vocabulary, syntax and phonetics from its associated spoken one, a situation called diglossia. In addition to its use in communication, it is suggested by some psychologists such as Lev Vygotsky that speech is internally used in mental processes to enhance and organize cognition in the form of an interior monologue. Speech is researched in terms of the speech production and speech perception of the sounds used in vocal language. Other research topics concern speech repetition, the ability to map heard spoken words into the vocalizations needed to recreate them, which plays a key role in vocabulary expansion in children and speech errors. Several academic disciplines study these; including acoustics, psychology, speech pathology, linguistics, cognitive science, communication studies, otolaryngology and computer science. Another area of research is how the human brain in its different areas such as the Broca's area and Wernicke's area underlies speech. It is controversial how far human speech is unique; in that animals also communicate with vocalizations. While none in the wild have comparably large vocabularies, research upon the nonverbal abilities of language trained apes such as Washoe and Kanzi raises the possibility that they might have these capabilities. The evolutionary origins of speech are unknown and subject to much debate and speculation.

Speach

Speech is the vocalized form of communication used by humans and some animals, which is based upon the syntactic combination of items drawn from the lexicon. Each spoken word is created out of the phonetic combination of a limited set of vowel and consonant speech sound units (phonemes). These vocabularies, the syntax that structures them, and their sets of speech sound units differ, creating many thousands of different, and mutually unintelligible, human languages. The vocal abilities that enable humans to produce speech also enable them to sing. A gestural form of human communication exists for the deaf in the form of sign language. Speech in some cultures has become the basis of written language, often one that differs in its vocabulary, syntax and phonetics from its associated spoken one, a situation called diglossia. In addition to its use in communication, it is suggested by some psychologists such as Lev Vygotsky that speech is internally used in mental processes to enhance and organize cognition in the form of an interior monologue. Speech is researched in terms of the speech production and speech perception of the sounds used in vocal language. Other research topics concern speech repetition, the ability to map heard spoken words into the vocalizations needed to recreate them, which plays a key role in vocabulary expansion in children and speech errors. Several academic disciplines study these; including acoustics, psychology, speech pathology, linguistics, cognitive science, communication studies, otolaryngology and computer science. Another area of research is how the human brain in its different areas such as the Broca's area and Wernicke's area underlies speech. It is controversial how far human speech is unique; in that animals also communicate with vocalizations. While none in the wild have comparably large vocabularies, research upon the nonverbal abilities of language trained apes such as Washoe and Kanzi raises the possibility that they might have these capabilities. The evolutionary origins of speech are unknown and subject to much debate and speculation.

Speech vs. Speach

Speech

Table of contents

1. Etymology
          3.1. Synonyms
          3.2. Related terms
          4.1. Derived terms

Speach

Table of contents

1. Noun

Speech

1. Etymology

From Middle English speche, from Old English spǣċ, sprǣċ (speech, discourse, language), from Proto-Germanic *sprēkijō, *sprēkō (speech, language), from Proto-Indo-European *spereg-, *spreg- (to make a sound). Cognate with Dutch spraak (speech), German Sprache (language, speech). More at speak.

2. Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈspiːtʃ/
  • Rhymes: -iːtʃ

3. Noun

speech (countable and uncountable, plural speeches)

  1. (uncountable) The faculty of uttering articulate sounds or words; the ability to speak or to use vocalizations to communicate.
  2. (countable) A session of speaking; a long oral message given publicly usually by one person.
    • Jonathan Swift (1667–1745)
      The constant design of these orators, in all their speeches, was to drive some one particular point.
  3. A style of speaking.
  4. (grammar) Speech reported in writing; see direct speech, reported speech
  5. A dialect or language.
    • Bible, Ezekiel iii. 6
      people of a strange speech
  6. Talk; mention; rumour.
    • William Shakespeare (1564-1616)
      The duke [] did of me demand / What was the speech among the Londoners / Concerning the French journey.

3.1. Synonyms

  • (session of speaking): monologue, oration, soliloquy
  • (style of speaking): For semantic relationships of this term, see speech in the Thesaurus.
  • (dialect or language): For semantic relationships of this term, see language in the Thesaurus.
  • speak

4. Verb

speech (third-person singular simple present speeches, present participle speeching, simple past and past participle speeched)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To make a speech; to harangue.

4.1. Derived terms

  • bespeech

5. Anagrams

  • cheeps

Speach

1. Noun

speach (countable and uncountable, plural speaches)

  1. Obsolete form of speech.
  2. Misspelling of speech.

2. Anagrams

  • Cephas, Pechas, Pesach, chapes, cheaps

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