Unpatient vs. Impatient - What's the difference?

Wiktionary

  • Unpatient (adjective)

    obsolete form of impatient

    "Forsooth he that is unpatient, shall suffer harm; and when he hath ravished, he shall lay to another thing. (Wycliffe Bible, Proverbs 19:19)"

    "The Lord is King, be the people never so unpatient: he sitteth between the cherubims, be the earth never so unquiet. (The Book of Common Prayer, 1662, Psalm 99:1)"

  • Impatient (adjective)

    Restless and intolerant of delays.

  • Impatient (adjective)

    Anxious and eager, especially to begin something.

  • Impatient (adjective)

    Not to be borne; unendurable.

  • Impatient (adjective)

    Prompted by, or exhibiting, impatience.

    "impatient speeches or replies"

Oxford Dictionary

  • Unpatient (adjective)

    Impatient. Formerly also with of, to.

Webster Dictionary

  • Unpatient (adjective)

    Impatient.

  • Impatient (adjective)

    Not patient; not bearing with composure; intolerant; uneasy; fretful; restless, because of pain, delay, or opposition; eager for change, or for something expected; hasty; passionate; - often followed by at, for, of, and under.

  • Impatient (adjective)

    Not to be borne; unendurable.

  • Impatient (adjective)

    Prompted by, or exhibiting, impatience; as, impatient speeches or replies.

  • Impatient (noun)

    One who is impatient.

Princeton's WordNet

  • Impatient (adjective)

    restless or short of temper under delay or opposition;

    "impatient with the slower students"

    "impatient of criticism"

  • Impatient (adjective)

    (usually followed by `to') full of eagerness;

    "impatient to begin"

    "raring to go"

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