VS.

Speek vs. Speak

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Speakverb

(intransitive) To communicate with one's voice, to say words out loud.

‘I was so surprised I couldn't speak.’; ‘You're speaking too fast.’;

Speakverb

(intransitive) To have a conversation.

‘It's been ages since we've spoken.’;

Speakverb

(by extension) To communicate or converse by some means other than orally, such as writing or facial expressions.

‘He spoke of it in his diary.’; ‘Speak to me only with your eyes.’; ‘Actions speak louder than words.’;

Speakverb

(intransitive) To deliver a message to a group; to deliver a speech.

‘This evening I shall speak on the topic of correct English usage.’;

Speakverb

(transitive) To be able to communicate in a language.

‘He speaks Mandarin fluently.’;

Speakverb

(transitive) To utter.

‘I was so surprised that I couldn't speak a word.’;

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Speakverb

(transitive) To communicate (some fact or feeling); to bespeak, to indicate.

Speakverb

To understand (as though it were a language).

‘Sorry, I don't speak idiot.’; ‘So you can program in C. But do you speak C++?’;

Speakverb

(intransitive) To produce a sound; to sound.

Speakverb

To address; to accost; to speak to.

Speaknoun

language, jargon, or terminology used uniquely in a particular environment or group.

‘Corporate speak; IT speak.’;

Speaknoun

Speach, conversation.

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Speaknoun

(dated) a low class bar, a speakeasy.

Speakverb

To utter words or articulate sounds, as human beings; to express thoughts by words; as, the organs may be so obstructed that a man may not be able to speak.

‘Till at the last spake in this manner.’; ‘Speak, Lord; for thy servant heareth.’;

Speakverb

To express opinions; to say; to talk; to converse.

‘That fluid substance in a few minutes begins to set, as the tradesmen speak.’; ‘An honest man, is able to speak for himself, when a knave is not.’; ‘During the century and a half which followed the Conquest, there is, to speak strictly, no English history.’;

Speakverb

To utter a speech, discourse, or harangue; to adress a public assembly formally.

‘Many of the nobility made themselves popular by speaking in Parliament against those things which were most grateful to his majesty.’;

Speakverb

To discourse; to make mention; to tell.

‘Lycan speaks of a part of Cæsar's army that came to him from the Leman Lake.’;

Speakverb

To give sound; to sound.

‘Make all our trumpets speak.’;

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Speakverb

To convey sentiments, ideas, or intelligence as if by utterance; as, features that speak of self-will.

‘Thine eye begins to speak.’;

Speakverb

To utter with the mouth; to pronounce; to utter articulately, as human beings.

‘They sat down with him upn ground seven days and seven nights, and none spake a word unto him.’;

Speakverb

To utter in a word or words; to say; to tell; to declare orally; as, to speak the truth; to speak sense.

Speakverb

To declare; to proclaim; to publish; to make known; to exhibit; to express in any way.

‘It is my father;s musteTo speak your deeds.’; ‘Speaking a still good morrow with her eyes.’; ‘And for the heaven's wide circuit, let it speakThe maker's high magnificence.’; ‘Report speaks you a bonny monk.’;

Speakverb

To talk or converse in; to utter or pronounce, as in conversation; as, to speak Latin.

‘And French she spake full fair and fetisely.’;

Speakverb

To address; to accost; to speak to.

‘[He will] thee in hope; he will speak thee fair.’; ‘each village senior paused to scanAnd speak the lovely caravan.’;

Speakverb

express in speech;

‘She talks a lot of nonsense’; ‘This depressed patient does not verbalize’;

Speakverb

exchange thoughts; talk with;

‘We often talk business’; ‘Actions talk louder than words’;

Speakverb

use language;

‘the baby talks already’; ‘the prisoner won't speak’; ‘they speak a strange dialect’;

Speakverb

give a speech to;

‘The chairman addressed the board of trustees’;

Speakverb

make a characteristic or natural sound;

‘The drums spoke’;

Speakverb

say something in order to convey information or to express a feeling

‘in his agitation he was unable to speak’; ‘she refused to speak about the incident’;

Speakverb

have a conversation

‘last time we spoke, you told me you couldn't do the job’; ‘I'll speak to him if he rings up’;

Speakverb

utter (a word, message, etc.)

‘patients copy words spoken by the therapist’;

Speakverb

communicate in or be able to communicate in (a specified language)

‘my mother spoke Russian’;

Speakverb

make a speech or contribute to a debate

‘twenty thousand people attended to hear him speak’;

Speakverb

express the views or position of (another)

‘he claimed to speak for the majority of local people’;

Speakverb

convey one's views or position indirectly

‘speaking through his solicitor, he refused to join the debate’;

Speakverb

answer (a question) or address (an issue or problem)

‘we should be disappointed if the report did not speak to the issue of literacy’;

Speakverb

mention or discuss in speech or writing

‘the books speak of betrayal’;

Speakverb

talk to in order to reprove or advise

‘she tried to speak to Seb about his drinking’;

Speakverb

talk to in order to give or obtain information

‘he had spoken to the police’;

Speakverb

discuss or comment on formally

‘the Church wants to speak to real issues’;

Speakverb

appeal or relate to

‘the story spoke to him directly’;

Speakverb

(of behaviour, an object, etc.) serve as evidence for something

‘his frame spoke tiredness’; ‘everything in the house spoke of hard times and neglect’;

Speakverb

show (someone or something) to be in a particular state or to possess a certain quality

‘she had seen nothing that spoke him of immoral habits’;

Speakverb

(of a musical instrument or other object) make a sound when functioning

‘insufficient air circulates for the pipes to speak’; ‘the gun spoke again’;

Speakverb

(of a hound) bark.

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