Shpitzel vs. Sheitel - What's the difference?

Wikipedia

  • Shpitzel

    A shpitzel is a head covering worn by some married Hasidic women. It is a partial wig that only has hair in the front, the rest typically covered by a small pillbox hat or a headscarf. The hairpiece may actually be silk or lace, or else made of synthetic fibers, to avoid too closely resembling real hair. According to Jewish law (halacha) concerning modesty (tzniut), a woman must cover her hair after marriage. The shpitzel was popular among Hungarian Hasidim in the 19th century, and it is worn by some contemporary women who follow the customs of that community.

  • Sheitel

    Sheitel (Yiddish: שייטל‎, sheytl m.sg.; שייטלעך, sheytlekh m.pl. or שייטלען, sheytlen m.pl.; Hebrew: פאה נוכרית‎) is a wig or half-wig worn by some Orthodox Jewish married women in order to conform with the requirement of Jewish law to cover their hair. Depending on different Hasidic groups, sheitels are either encouraged or avoided.

Wiktionary

  • Shpitzel (noun)

    A partial wig that reveals the wearer's hair only at the front, worn by some married Hasidic women.

  • Sheitel (noun)

    A wig worn by married orthodox Jewish women.

Oxford Dictionary

  • Sheitel (noun)

    (among orthodox Ashkenazic Jews) a wig worn by a married woman.

Illustrations

Shpitzel

Sheitel

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