VS.

Immerse vs. Emerse

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Immerseverb

(transitive) To put under the surface of a liquid; to dunk.

‘Archimedes determined the volume of objects by immersing them in water.’;

Emerseadjective

denoting or characteristic of an aquatic plant reaching above the surface of the water

‘the emerse leaves when developed are heart-shaped’;

Immerseverb

(transitive) To involve or engage deeply.

‘The sculptor immersed himself in anatomic studies.’;

Immerseverb

To map into an immersion.

Immerseadjective

(obsolete) Immersed; buried; sunk.

Immerseadjective

Immersed; buried; hid; sunk.

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Immerseverb

To plunge into anything that surrounds or covers, especially into a fluid; to dip; to sink; to bury; to immerge.

‘Deep immersed beneath its whirling wave.’; ‘More than a mile immersed within the wood.’;

Immerseverb

To baptize by immersion.

Immerseverb

To engage deeply; to engross the attention of; to involve; to overhelm.

‘The queen immersed in such a trance.’; ‘It is impossible to have a lively hope in another life, and yet be deeply immersed inn the enjoyments of this.’;

Immerseverb

thrust or throw into;

‘Immerse yourself in hot water’;

Immerseverb

engross (oneself) fully;

‘He immersed himself into his studies’;

Immerseverb

enclose or envelop completely, as if by swallowing;

‘The huge waves swallowed the small boat and it sank shortly thereafter’;

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Immerseverb

cause to be immersed;

‘The professor plunged his students into the study of the Italian text’;

Immerseverb

dip or submerge in a liquid

‘immerse the paper in water for twenty minutes’;

Immerseverb

baptize (someone) by immersion in water.

Immerseverb

involve oneself deeply in a particular activity

‘she immersed herself in her work’; ‘she was still immersed in her thoughts’;

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