VS.

Argument vs. Arguement

Published:
Views: 11,009

Argumentnoun

A fact or statement used to support a proposition; a reason.

Arguementnoun

obsolete form of argument

Argumentnoun

A verbal dispute; a quarrel.

Arguementnoun

misspelling of argument

Argumentnoun

A process of reasoning.

Argumentnoun

A series of propositions organized so that the final proposition is a conclusion which is intended to follow logically from the preceding propositions, which function as premises.

ADVERTISEMENT

Argumentnoun

(mathematics) The independent variable of a function.

Argumentnoun

(mathematics) The phase of a complex number.

Argumentnoun

(programming) A value, or reference to a value, passed to a function.

‘Parameters are like labeled fillable blanks used to define a function whereas arguments are passed to a function when calling it, filling in those blanks.’;

Argumentnoun

(programming) A parameter in a function definition; an actual parameter, as opposed to a formal parameter.

Argumentnoun

(linguistics) Any of the phrases that bears a syntactic connection to the verb of a clause.

ADVERTISEMENT

Argumentnoun

Matter for question; business in hand.

Argumentverb

To put forward as an argument; to argue.

Argumentnoun

Proof; evidence.

‘There is.. no more palpable and convincing argument of the existence of a Deity.’; ‘Why, then, is it made a badge of wit and an argument of parts for a man to commence atheist, and to cast off all belief of providence, all awe and reverence for religion?’;

Argumentnoun

A reason or reasons offered in proof, to induce belief, or convince the mind; reasoning expressed in words; as, an argument about, concerning, or regarding a proposition, for or in favor of it, or against it.

Argumentnoun

A process of reasoning, or a controversy made up of rational proofs; argumentation; discussion; disputation.

‘The argument is about things, but names.’;

ADVERTISEMENT

Argumentnoun

The subject matter of a discourse, writing, or artistic representation; theme or topic; also, an abstract or summary, as of the contents of a book, chapter, poem.

‘You and love are still my argument.’; ‘The abstract or argument of the piece.’; ‘[Shields] with boastful argument portrayed.’;

Argumentnoun

Matter for question; business in hand.

‘Sheathed their swords for lack of argument.’;

Argumentnoun

The independent variable upon whose value that of a function depends.

Argumentnoun

a fact or assertion offered as evidence that something is true;

‘it was a strong argument that his hypothesis was true’;

Argumentnoun

a contentious speech act; a dispute where there is strong disagreement;

‘they were involved in a violent argument’;

Argumentnoun

a discussion in which reasons are advanced for and against some proposition or proposal;

‘the argument over foreign aid goes on and on’;

Argumentnoun

a summary of the subject or plot of a literary work or play or movie;

‘the editor added the argument to the poem’;

Argumentnoun

a variable in a logical or mathematical expression whose value determines the dependent variable; if f(x)=y, x is the independent variable

Argumentnoun

an exchange of diverging or opposite views, typically a heated or angry one

‘there was some argument about the decision’; ‘I've had an argument with my father’; ‘heated arguments over public spending’;

Argumentnoun

a reason or set of reasons given in support of an idea, action or theory

‘he rejected the argument that keeping the facility would be costly’; ‘there is a strong argument for submitting a formal appeal’;

Argumentnoun

an independent variable associated with a function or proposition and determining its value. For example, in the expression y = F(x₁, x₂), the arguments of the function F are x₁ and x₂, and the value is y.

Argumentnoun

another term for amplitude (sense 4)

Argumentnoun

any of the noun phrases in a clause that are related directly to the verb, typically the subject, direct object, and indirect object.

Argumentnoun

a summary of the subject matter of a book.

Argument

In logic and philosophy, an argument is a series of statements (in a natural language), called the premises or premisses (both spellings are acceptable), intended to determine the degree of truth of another statement, the conclusion. The logical form of an argument in a natural language can be represented in a symbolic formal language, and independently of natural language formally defined can be made in math and computer science.

‘arguments’;

Popular Comparisons

Latest Comparisons

Trending Comparisons