VS.

Priviledge vs. Privilege

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Priviledgenoun

obsolete form of privilege

Privilegenoun

An exemption from certain laws granted by the Pope.

Privilegenoun

(countable) A particular benefit, advantage, or favor; a right or immunity enjoyed by some but not others; a prerogative, preferential treatment.

‘All first-year professors here must teach four courses a term, yet you're only teaching one! What entitled you to such a privilege?’;

Privilegenoun

An especially rare or fortunate opportunity; the good fortune (to do something).

Privilegenoun

(uncountable) The fact of being privileged; the status or existence of (now especially social or economic) benefit or advantage within a given society.

Privilegenoun

A right or immunity enjoyed by a legislative body or its members.

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Privilegenoun

A stock market option.

Privilegenoun

(legal) A common law doctrine that protects certain communications from being used as evidence in court.

‘''Your honor, my client is not required to answer that; her response is protected by attorney-client privilege.’;

Privilegenoun

(computing) An ability to perform an action on the system that can be selectively granted or denied to users; permission.

Privilegeverb

(archaic) To grant some particular right or exemption to; to invest with a peculiar right or immunity; to authorize

‘to privilege representatives from arrest’;

Privilegeverb

(archaic) To bring or put into a condition of privilege or exemption from evil or danger; to exempt; to deliver.

Privilegenoun

A peculiar benefit, advantage, or favor; a right or immunity not enjoyed by others or by all; special enjoyment of a good, or exemption from an evil or burden; a prerogative; advantage; franchise.

‘He pleads the legal privilege of a Roman.’; ‘The privilege birthright was a double portion.’; ‘A people inheriting privileges, franchises, and liberties.’;

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Privilegenoun

See Call, Put, Spread, etc.

Privilegeverb

To grant some particular right or exemption to; to invest with a peculiar right or immunity; to authorize; as, to privilege representatives from arrest.

‘To privilege dishonor in thy name.’;

Privilegeverb

To bring or put into a condition of privilege or exemption from evil or danger; to exempt; to deliver.

‘He took this place for sanctuary, And it shall privilege him from your hands.’;

Privilegenoun

a special advantage or immunity or benefit not enjoyed by all

Privilegenoun

a right reserved exclusively by a particular person or group (especially a hereditary or official right);

‘suffrage was the prerogative of white adult males’;

Privilegenoun

(law) the right to refuse to divulge information obtained in a confidential relationship

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Privilegeverb

bestow a privilege upon

Privilegenoun

a special right, advantage, or immunity granted or available only to a particular person or group

‘education is a right, not a privilege’; ‘he has been accustomed all his life to wealth and privilege’;

Privilegenoun

something regarded as a special honour

‘I had the privilege of giving the Sir George Brown memorial lecture’;

Privilegenoun

(especially in a parliamentary context) the right to say or write something without the risk of incurring punishment or legal action for defamation

‘a breach of parliamentary privilege’; ‘he called on MPs not to abuse their privilege’;

Privilegenoun

the right of a lawyer or official to refuse to divulge confidential information.

Privilegenoun

a grant to an individual, corporation, or place of special rights or immunities, especially in the form of a franchise or monopoly.

Privilegeverb

grant a privilege or privileges to

‘English inheritance law privileged the eldest son’;

Privilegeverb

exempt (someone) from a liability or obligation to which others are subject

‘barristers are privileged from arrest going to, coming from, and abiding in court’;

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