VS.

Already vs. Almost

Published:

Alreadyadverb

Prior to some specified time, either past, present, or future; by this time; previously.

Almostadverb

Very close to, but not quite.

‘Almost all people went there. - Not all but very close to it.’; ‘We almost missed the train. - Not missed but very close to it.’;

Alreadyadverb

So soon.

‘Are you quitting already?’;

Almostnoun

(informal) Something or someone that doesn't quite make it.

‘In all the submissions, they found four papers that were clearly worth publishing and another dozen almosts.’;

Alreadyadverb

(US) An intensifier used to emphasize impatience or express exasperation.

‘I wish they'd finish already, so we can get going.’; ‘Enough already!’; ‘Be quiet already!’;

Almostadverb

Nearly; well nigh; all but; for the greatest part.

‘Almost thou persuadest me to be a Christian.’;

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Alreadyadverb

Prior to some specified time, either past, present, or future; by this time; previously.

‘I say unto you, that Elias is come already.’;

Almostadverb

(of actions or states) slightly short of or not quite accomplished; `near' is sometimes used informally for `nearly' and `most' is sometimes used informally for `almost';

‘the job is (just) about done’; ‘the baby was almost asleep when the alarm sounded’; ‘we're almost finished’; ‘the car all but ran her down’; ‘he nearly fainted’; ‘talked for nigh onto 2 hours’; ‘the recording is well-nigh perfect’; ‘virtually all the parties signed the contract’; ‘I was near exhausted by the run’; ‘most everyone agrees’;

Alreadyadverb

prior to a specified or implied time;

‘she has already graduated’;

Almostadverb

not quite; very nearly

‘he almost knocked Georgina over’; ‘the place was almost empty’; ‘blues, jazz—he can play almost anything’;

Almost

In set theory, when dealing with sets of infinite size, the term almost or nearly is used to refer to all but a negligible amount of elements in the set. The notion of depends in the context, and may mean (in a measure space), (when uncountably infinite sets are involved), or (when infinite sets are involved).For example: The set S = { n ∈ N | n ≥ k } {\displaystyle S=\{n\in \mathbb {N} \,|\,n\geq k\}} is almost N {\displaystyle \mathbb {N} } for any k {\displaystyle k} in N {\displaystyle \mathbb {N} } , because only finitely many natural numbers are less than k {\displaystyle k} .

‘negligible’; ‘of measure zero’; ‘countable’; ‘finite’;

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