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Drama vs. Melodrama

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Dramanoun

A composition, normally in prose, telling a story and intended to be represented by actors impersonating the characters and speaking the dialogue

Melodramanoun

A kind of drama having a musical accompaniment to intensify the effect of certain scenes.

Dramanoun

Such a work for television, radio or the cinema (usually one that is not a comedy)

Melodramanoun

(countable) A drama abounding in romantic sentiment and agonizing situations, with a musical accompaniment only in parts which are especially thrilling or pathetic. In opera, a passage in which the orchestra plays a somewhat descriptive accompaniment, while the actor speaks

‘the melodrama in the grave digging scene of Beethoven's "Fidelio".’;

Dramanoun

Theatrical plays in general

Melodramanoun

Any situation or action which is blown out of proportion.

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Dramanoun

A situation in real life that has the characteristics of such a theatrical play

Melodramanoun

Formerly, a kind of drama having a musical accompaniment to intensify the effect of certain scenes. Now, a drama abounding in romantic sentiment and agonizing situations, with a musical accompaniment only in parts which are especially thrilling or pathetic. In opera, a passage in which the orchestra plays a somewhat descriptive accompaniment, while the actor speaks; as, the melodrama in the gravedigging scene of Beethoven's "Fidelio".

Dramanoun

(slang) Rumor, lying or exaggerated reaction to life events; melodrama; an angry dispute or scene; intrigue or spiteful interpersonal maneuvering.

Melodramanoun

an extravagant comedy in which action is more salient than characterization

Dramanoun

A composition, in prose or poetry, accommodated to action, and intended to exhibit a picture of human life, or to depict a series of grave or humorous actions of more than ordinary interest, tending toward some striking result. It is commonly designed to be spoken and represented by actors on the stage.

‘A divine pastoral drama in the Song of Solomon.’;

Melodrama

In modern usage, a melodrama is a dramatic work wherein the plot, which is typically sensational and designed to appeal strongly to the emotions, takes precedence over detailed characterization. Melodramas typically concentrate on dialogue, which is often bombastic or excessively sentimental, rather than action.

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Dramanoun

A series of real events invested with a dramatic unity and interest.

‘Westward the course of empire takes its way;The four first acts already past,A fifth shall close the drama with the day;Time's noblest offspring is the last.’; ‘The drama and contrivances of God's providence.’;

Dramanoun

Dramatic composition and the literature pertaining to or illustrating it; dramatic literature.

Dramanoun

a dramatic work intended for performance by actors on a stage;

‘he wrote several plays but only one was produced on Broadway’;

Dramanoun

an episode that is turbulent or highly emotional

Dramanoun

the literary genre of works intended for the theater

Dramanoun

the quality of being arresting or highly emotional

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Dramanoun

a play for theatre, radio, or television

‘a gritty urban drama about growing up in Harlem’;

Dramanoun

plays as a genre or style of literature

‘Renaissance drama’;

Dramanoun

the activity of acting

‘drama school’; ‘teachers who use drama are working in partnership with pupils’;

Dramanoun

an exciting, emotional, or unexpected event or circumstance

‘a hostage drama’; ‘an afternoon of high drama at Wembley’;

Drama

Drama is the specific mode of fiction represented in performance: a play, opera, mime, ballet, etc., performed in a theatre, or on radio or television. Considered as a genre of poetry in general, the dramatic mode has been contrasted with the epic and the lyrical modes ever since Aristotle's Poetics (c.

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