VS.

Will vs. Trust

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Willverb

To wish, desire (something).

‘Do what you will.’;

Trustnoun

Confidence in or reliance on some person or quality.

‘He needs to regain her trust if he is ever going to win her back.’;

Willverb

To wish or desire (that something happen); to intend (that).

Trustnoun

Dependence upon something in the future; hope.

Willverb

(auxiliary) To habitually do (a given action).

Trustnoun

Confidence in the future payment for goods or services supplied; credit.

‘I was out of cash, but the landlady let me have it on trust.’;

Willverb

(auxiliary) To choose to (do something), used to express intention but without any temporal connotations (+ bare infinitive).

Trustnoun

That which is committed or entrusted; something received in confidence; a charge.

Willverb

(auxiliary) Used to express the future tense, sometimes with some implication of volition when used in the first person. Compare shall.

Trustnoun

That upon which confidence is reposed; ground of reliance; hope.

Willverb

(auxiliary) To be able to, to have the capacity to.

‘Unfortunately, only one of these gloves will actually fit over my hand.’;

Trustnoun

(rare) Trustworthiness, reliability.

Willverb

(archaic) To wish, desire.

Trustnoun

The condition or obligation of one to whom anything is confided; responsible charge or office.

Willverb

To instruct (that something be done) in one's will.

Trustnoun

(legal) The confidence vested in a person who has legal ownership of a property to manage for the benefit of another.

‘I put the house into my sister's trust.’;

Willverb

(transitive) To try to make (something) happen by using one's will (intention).

‘All the fans were willing their team to win the game.’;

Trustnoun

(legal) An estate devised or granted in confidence that the devisee or grantee shall convey it, or dispose of the profits, at the will, or for the benefit, of another; an estate held for the use of another.

Willverb

(transitive) To bequeath (something) to someone in one's will (legal document).

‘He willed his stamp collection to the local museum.’;

Trustnoun

A group of businessmen or traders organised for mutual benefit to produce and distribute specific commodities or services, and managed by a central body of trustees.

Willnoun

One's independent faculty of choice; the ability to be able to exercise one's choice or intention.

‘Of course, man's will is often regulated by his reason.’;

Trustnoun

(computing) Affirmation of the access rights of a user of a computer system.

Willnoun

One's intention or decision; someone's orders or commands.

‘Eventually I submitted to my parents' will.’;

Trustverb

(transitive) To place confidence in; to rely on, to confide, or have faith, in.

‘We cannot trust anyone who deceives us.’; ‘In God We Trust - written on denominations of US currency’;

Willnoun

The act of choosing to do something; a person’s conscious intent or volition.

‘Most creatures have a will to live.’;

Trustverb

(transitive) To give credence to; to believe; to credit.

Willnoun

A formal declaration of one's intent concerning the disposal of one's property and holdings after death; the legal document stating such wishes.

Trustverb

(transitive) To hope confidently; to believe (usually with a phrase or infinitive clause as the object)

‘I trust you have cleaned your room?’;

Willnoun

(archaic) That which is desired; one's wish.

Trustverb

(transitive) to show confidence in a person by entrusting them with something.

Willnoun

(archaic) Desire, longing. (Now generally merged with later senses.)

‘He felt a great will to make a pilgrimage to the Holy Land.’;

Trustverb

(transitive) To commit, as to one's care; to entrust.

Willnoun

The power of choosing; the faculty or endowment of the soul by which it is capable of choosing; the faculty or power of the mind by which we decide to do or not to do; the power or faculty of preferring or selecting one of two or more objects.

‘It is necessary to form a distinct notion of what is meant by the word "volition" in order to understand the import of the word will, for this last word expresses the power of mind of which "volition" is the act.’; ‘Will is an ambiguous word, being sometimes put for the faculty of willing; sometimes for the act of that faculty, besides [having] other meanings. But "volition" always signifies the act of willing, and nothing else.’; ‘Appetite is the will's solicitor, and the will is appetite's controller; what we covet according to the one, by the other we often reject.’; ‘The will is plainly that by which the mind chooses anything.’;

Trustverb

(transitive) To give credit to; to sell to upon credit, or in confidence of future payment.

‘Merchants and manufacturers trust their customers annually with goods.’;

Willnoun

The choice which is made; a determination or preference which results from the act or exercise of the power of choice; a volition.

‘The word "will," however, is not always used in this its proper acceptation, but is frequently substituted for "volition", as when I say that my hand mover in obedience to my will.’;

Trustverb

To risk; to venture confidently.

Willnoun

The choice or determination of one who has authority; a decree; a command; discretionary pleasure.

‘Thy will be done.’; ‘Our prayers should be according to the will of God.’;

Trustverb

(intransitive) To have trust; to be credulous; to be won to confidence; to confide.

Willnoun

Strong wish or inclination; desire; purpose.

‘My poverty, but not my will, consents; . . . Put this in any liquid thing you will,And drink it off.’;

Trustverb

(intransitive) To be confident, as of something future; to hope.

Willnoun

That which is strongly wished or desired.

‘What's your will, good friar?’; ‘The mariner hath his will.’;

Trustverb

To sell or deliver anything in reliance upon a promise of payment; to give credit.

Willnoun

Arbitrary disposal; power to control, dispose, or determine.

‘Deliver me not over unto the will of mine enemies.’;

Trustadjective

(obsolete) Secure, safe.

Willnoun

The legal declaration of a person's mind as to the manner in which he would have his property or estate disposed of after his death; the written instrument, legally executed, by which a man makes disposition of his estate, to take effect after his death; testament; devise. See the Note under Testament, 1.

Trustadjective

(obsolete) Faithful, dependable.

Willverb

To wish; to desire; to incline to have.

‘A wife as of herself no thing ne sholde [should]Wille in effect, but as her husband wolde [would].’; ‘Caleb said unto her, What will thou ?’; ‘They would none of my counsel.’;

Trustadjective

(legal) of or relating to a trust.

Willverb

As an auxiliary, will is used to denote futurity dependent on the verb. Thus, in first person, "I will" denotes willingness, consent, promise; and when "will" is emphasized, it denotes determination or fixed purpose; as, I will go if you wish; I will go at all hazards. In the second and third persons, the idea of distinct volition, wish, or purpose is evanescent, and simple certainty is appropriately expressed; as, "You will go," or "He will go," describes a future event as a fact only. To emphasize will denotes (according to the tone or context) certain futurity or fixed determination.

‘I am able to devote as much time and attention to other subjects as I will [shall] be under the necessity of doing next winter.’; ‘A countryman, telling us what he had seen, remarked that if the conflagration went on, as it was doing, we would [should] have, as our next season's employment, the Old Town of Edinburgh to rebuild.’; ‘I feel assured that I will [shall] not have the misfortune to find conflicting views held by one so enlightened as your excellency.’;

Trustnoun

Assured resting of the mind on the integrity, veracity, justice, friendship, or other sound principle, of another person; confidence; reliance; reliance.

‘Most take things upon trust.’;

Willverb

To be willing; to be inclined or disposed; to be pleased; to wish; to desire.

‘And behold, there came a leper and worshiped him, saying, Lord if thou wilt, thou canst make me clean. And Jesus . . . touched him, saying, I will; be thou clean.’;

Trustnoun

Credit given; especially, delivery of property or merchandise in reliance upon future payment; exchange without immediate receipt of an equivalent; as, to sell or buy goods on trust.

Willverb

To form a distinct volition of; to determine by an act of choice; to ordain; to decree.

‘By all law and reason, that which the Parliament will not, is no more established in this kingdom.’; ‘Two things he [God] willeth, that we should be good, and that we should be happy.’;

Trustnoun

Assured anticipation; dependence upon something future or contingent, as if present or actual; hope; belief.

‘His trust was with the Eternal to be deemedEqual in strength.’;

Willverb

To enjoin or command, as that which is determined by an act of volition; to direct; to order.

‘They willed me say so, madam.’; ‘Send for music,And will the cooks to use their best of cunningTo please the palate.’; ‘As you go, will the lord mayor . . . To attend our further pleasure presently.’;

Trustnoun

That which is committed or intrusted to one; something received in confidence; charge; deposit.

Willverb

To give or direct the disposal of by testament; to bequeath; to devise; as, to will one's estate to a child; also, to order or direct by testament; as, he willed that his nephew should have his watch.

Trustnoun

The condition or obligation of one to whom anything is confided; responsible charge or office.

‘[I] serve him truly that will put me in trust.’; ‘Reward them well, if they observe their trust.’;

Willverb

To exercise an act of volition; to choose; to decide; to determine; to decree.

‘At Winchester he lies, so himself willed.’; ‘He that shall turn his thoughts inward upon what passes in his own mind when he wills.’; ‘I contend for liberty as it signifies a power in man to do as he wills or pleases.’;

Trustnoun

That upon which confidence is reposed; ground of reliance; hope.

‘O Lord God, thou art my trust from my youth.’;

Willnoun

the capability of conscious choice and decision and intention;

‘the exercise of their volition we construe as revolt’;

Trustnoun

An estate devised or granted in confidence that the devisee or grantee shall convey it, or dispose of the profits, at the will, or for the benefit, of another; an estate held for the use of another; a confidence respecting property reposed in one person, who is termed the trustee, for the benefit of another, who is called the cestui que trust.

Willnoun

a fixed and persistent intent or purpose;

‘where there's a will there's a way’;

Trustnoun

An equitable right or interest in property distinct from the legal ownership thereof; a use (as it existed before the Statute of Uses); also, a property interest held by one person for the benefit of another. Trusts are active, or special, express, implied, constructive, etc. In a passive trust the trustee simply has title to the trust property, while its control and management are in the beneficiary.

Willnoun

a legal document declaring a person's wishes regarding the disposal of their property when they die

Trustnoun

A business organization or combination consisting of a number of firms or corporations operating, and often united, under an agreement creating a trust (in sense 1), esp. one formed mainly for the purpose of regulating the supply and price of commodities, etc.; often, opprobriously, a combination formed for the purpose of controlling or monopolizing a trade, industry, or business, by doing acts in restraint or trade; as, a sugar trust. A trust may take the form of a corporation or of a body of persons or corporations acting together by mutual arrangement, as under a contract or a so-called gentlemen's agreement. When it consists of corporations it may be effected by putting a majority of their stock either in the hands of a board of trustees (whence the name trust for the combination) or by transferring a majority to a holding company. The advantages of a trust are partly due to the economies made possible in carrying on a large business, as well as the doing away with competition. In the United States severe statutes against trusts have been passed by the Federal government and in many States, with elaborate statutory definitions.

Willverb

decree or ordain;

‘God wills our existence’;

Trustadjective

Held in trust; as, trust property; trustmoney.

Willverb

have in mind;

‘I will take the exam tomorrow’;

Trustverb

To place confidence in; to rely on, to confide, or repose faith, in; as, we can not trust those who have deceived us.

‘I will never trust his word after.’; ‘He that trusts every one without reserve will at last be deceived.’;

Willverb

determine by choice;

‘This action was willed and intended’;

Trustverb

To give credence to; to believe; to credit.

‘Trust me, you look well.’;

Willverb

leave or give by will after one's death;

‘My aunt bequeathed me all her jewelry’; ‘My grandfather left me his entire estate’;

Trustverb

To hope confidently; to believe; - usually with a phrase or infinitive clause as the object.

‘I trust to come unto you, and speak face to face.’; ‘We trustwe have a good conscience.’;

Trustverb

to show confidence in a person by intrusting (him) with something.

‘Whom, with your power and fortune, sir, you trust,Now to suspect is vain.’;

Trustverb

To commit, as to one's care; to intrust.

‘Merchants were not willing to trust precious cargoes to any custody but that of a man-of-war.’;

Trustverb

To give credit to; to sell to upon credit, or in confidence of future payment; as, merchants and manufacturers trust their customers annually with goods.

Trustverb

To risk; to venture confidently.

‘[Beguiled] by theeto trust thee from my side.’;

Trustverb

To have trust; to be credulous; to be won to confidence; to confide.

‘More to know could not be more to trust.’;

Trustverb

To be confident, as of something future; to hope.

‘I will trust and not be afraid.’;

Trustverb

To sell or deliver anything in reliance upon a promise of payment; to give credit.

‘It is happier sometimes to be cheated than not to trust.’; ‘Her widening streets on new foundations trust.’; ‘They trusted unto the liers in wait.’;

Trustnoun

something (as property) held by one party (the trustee) for the benefit of another (the beneficiary);

‘he is the beneficiary of a generous trust set up by his father’;

Trustnoun

certainty based on past experience;

‘he wrote the paper with considerable reliance on the work of other scientists’; ‘he put more trust in his own two legs than in the gun’;

Trustnoun

the trait of trusting; of believing in the honesty and reliability of others;

‘the experience destroyed his trust and personal dignity’;

Trustnoun

a consortium of independent organizations formed to limit competition by controlling the production and distribution of a product or service;

‘they set up the trust in the hope of gaining a monopoly’;

Trustnoun

complete confidence in a person or plan etc;

‘he cherished the faith of a good woman’; ‘the doctor-patient relationship is based on trust’;

Trustnoun

a trustful relationship;

‘he took me into his confidence’; ‘he betrayed their trust’;

Trustverb

have confidence or faith in;

‘We can trust in God’; ‘Rely on your friends’; ‘bank on your good education’; ‘I swear by my grandmother's recipes’;

Trustverb

allow without fear

Trustverb

be confident about something;

‘I believe that he will come back from the war’;

Trustverb

expect and wish;

‘I trust you will behave better from now on’; ‘I hope she understands that she cannot expect a raise’;

Trustverb

confer a trust upon;

‘The messenger was entrusted with the general's secret’; ‘I commit my soul to God’;

Trustverb

extend credit to

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