VS.

Narrow vs. Thin

Published:

Narrowadjective

Having a small width; not wide; having opposite edges or sides that are close, especially by comparison to length or depth.

‘a narrow hallway’;

Thinadjective

Having little thickness or extent from one surface to its opposite.

‘thin plate of metal;’; ‘thin paper;’; ‘thin board;’; ‘thin covering’;

Narrowadjective

Of little extent; very limited; circumscribed.

Thinadjective

Very narrow in all diameters; having a cross section that is small in all directions.

‘thin wire;’; ‘thin string’;

Narrowadjective

(figuratively) Restrictive; without flexibility or latitude.

‘a narrow interpretation’;

Thinadjective

Having little body fat or flesh; slim; slender; lean; gaunt.

‘thin person’;

Narrowadjective

Contracted; of limited scope; bigoted

‘a narrow mind’; ‘narrow views’;

Thinadjective

Of low viscosity or low specific gravity, e.g., as is water compared to honey.

Narrowadjective

Having a small margin or degree.

‘a narrow escape’; ‘The Republicans won by a narrow majority.’;

Thinadjective

Scarce; not close, crowded, or numerous; not filling the space.

‘The trees of a forest are thin; the corn or grass is thin.’;

Narrowadjective

(dated) Limited as to means; straitened

‘narrow circumstances’;

Thinadjective

(golf) Describing a poorly played golf shot where the ball is struck by the bottom part of the club head. See fat, shank, toe.

Narrowadjective

Parsimonious; niggardly; covetous; selfish.

Thinadjective

Lacking body or volume; small; feeble; not full.

Narrowadjective

Scrutinizing in detail; close; accurate; exact.

Thinadjective

Slight; small; slender; flimsy; superficial; inadequate; not sufficient for a covering.

‘a thin disguise’;

Narrowadjective

(phonetics) Formed (as a vowel) by a close position of some part of the tongue in relation to the palate; or (according to Bell) by a tense condition of the pharynx; distinguished from wide.

Thinnoun

(philately) A loss or tearing of paper from the back of a stamp, although not sufficient to create a complete hole.

Narrownoun

A narrow passage, especially a contracted part of a stream, lake, or sea; a strait connecting two bodies of water.

‘the Narrows of New York harbor’;

Thinnoun

Any food produced or served in thin slices.

‘chocolate mint thins’; ‘potato thins’;

Narrowverb

(transitive) To reduce in width or extent; to contract.

‘We need to narrow the search.’;

Thinverb

(transitive) To make thin or thinner.

Narrowverb

(intransitive) To get narrower.

‘The road narrows.’;

Thinverb

(intransitive) To become thin or thinner.

Narrowverb

(of a person or eyes) To partially lower one's eyelids in a way usually taken to suggest a defensive, aggressive or penetrating look.

‘He stepped in front of me, narrowing his eyes to slits.’; ‘She wagged her finger in his face, and her eyes narrowed.’;

Thinverb

To dilute.

Narrowverb

(knitting) To contract the size of, as a stocking, by taking two stitches into one.

Thinverb

To remove some plants or parts of plants in order to improve the growth of what remains.

Narrowverb

To convert to a data type that cannot hold as many distinct values.

‘to narrow an int variable to a short variable’;

Thinadverb

Not thickly or closely; in a scattered state.

‘seed sown thin’;

Narrowadjective

Of little breadth; not wide or broad; having little distance from side to side; as, a narrow board; a narrow street; a narrow hem.

‘Hath passed in safety through the narrow seas.’;

Thinadjective

Having little thickness or extent from one surface to its opposite; as, a thin plate of metal; thin paper; a thin board; a thin covering.

Narrowadjective

Of little extent; very limited; circumscribed.

‘The Jews were but a small nation, and confined to a narrow compass in the world.’;

Thinadjective

Rare; not dense or thick; - applied to fluids or soft mixtures; as, thin blood; thin broth; thin air.

‘In the day, when the air is more thin.’; ‘Satan, bowing lowHis gray dissimulation, disappeared,Into thin air diffused.’;

Narrowadjective

Having but a little margin; having barely sufficient space, time, or number, etc.; close; near{5}; - with special reference to some peril or misfortune; as, a narrow shot; a narrow escape; a narrow miss; a narrow majority.

Thinadjective

Not close; not crowded; not filling the space; not having the individuals of which the thing is composed in a close or compact state; hence, not abundant; as, the trees of a forest are thin; the corn or grass is thin.

‘Ferrara is very large, but extremely thin of people.’;

Narrowadjective

Limited as to means; straitened; pinching; as, narrow circumstances.

Thinadjective

Not full or well grown; wanting in plumpness.

‘Seven thin ears . . . blasted with the east wind.’;

Narrowadjective

Contracted; of limited scope; illiberal; bigoted; as, a narrow mind; narrow views.

Thinadjective

Not stout; slim; slender; lean; gaunt; as, a person becomes thin by disease.

Narrowadjective

Parsimonious; niggardly; covetous; selfish.

‘A very narrow and stinted charity.’;

Thinadjective

Wanting in body or volume; small; feeble; not full.

‘Thin, hollow sounds, and lamentable screams.’;

Narrowadjective

Scrutinizing in detail; close; accurate; exact.

‘But first with narrow search I must walk roundThis garden, and no corner leave unspied.’;

Thinadjective

Slight; small; slender; flimsy; wanting substance or depth or force; superficial; inadequate; not sufficient for a covering; as, a thin disguise.

‘My tale is done, for my wit is but thin.’;

Narrowadjective

Formed (as a vowel) by a close position of some part of the tongue in relation to the palate; or (according to Bell) by a tense condition of the pharynx; - distinguished from wide; as ē (ēve) and Ō (fŌd), etc., from ĭ (ĭll) and Ŏ (fŎt), etc. See Guide to Pronunciation, 13.

Thinadverb

Not thickly or closely; in a seattered state; as, seed sown thin.

‘Spain is thin sown of people.’;

Narrownoun

A narrow passage; esp., a contracted part of a stream, lake, or sea; a strait connecting two bodies of water; - usually in the plural; as, The Narrows of New York harbor.

‘Near the island lay on one side the jaws of a dangerousnarrow.’;

Thinverb

To make thin (in any of the senses of the adjective).

Narrowverb

To lessen the breadth of; to contract; to draw into a smaller compass; to reduce the width or extent of.

Thinverb

To grow or become thin; - used with some adverbs, as out, away, etc.; as, geological strata thin out, i. e., gradually diminish in thickness until they disappear.

Narrowverb

To contract the reach or sphere of; to make less liberal or more selfish; to limit; to confine; to restrict; as, to narrow one's views or knowledge; to narrow a question in discussion.

‘Our knowledge is much more narrowed if we confine ourselves to our own solitary reasonings.’;

Thinverb

lose thickness; become thin or thinner

Narrowverb

To contract the size of, as a stocking, by taking two stitches into one.

Thinverb

make thin or thinner;

‘Thin the solution’;

Narrowverb

To become less broad; to contract; to become narrower; as, the sea narrows into a strait.

Thinverb

lessen the strength or flavor of a solution or mixture;

‘cut bourbon’;

Narrowverb

Not to step out enough to the one hand or the other; as, a horse narrows.

Thinverb

take off weight

Narrowverb

To contract the size of a stocking or other knit article, by taking two stitches into one.

Thinadjective

of relatively small extent from one surface to the opposite or in cross section;

‘thin wire’; ‘a thin chiffon blouse’; ‘a thin book’; ‘a thin layer of paint’;

Narrownoun

a narrow strait connecting two bodies of water

Thinadjective

lacking excess flesh;

‘you can't be too rich or too thin’; ‘Yon Cassius has a lean and hungry look’;

Narrowverb

make or become more narrow or restricted;

‘The selection was narrowed’; ‘The road narrowed’;

Thinadjective

very narrow;

‘a thin line across the page’;

Narrowverb

define clearly;

‘I cannot narrow down the rules for this game’;

Thinadjective

having little substance or significance;

‘a flimsy excuse’; ‘slight evidence’; ‘a tenuous argument’; ‘a thin plot’;

Narrowverb

become more special;

‘We specialize in dried flowers’;

Thinadjective

not dense;

‘a thin beard’; ‘trees were sparse’;

Narrowverb

become tight or as if tight;

‘Her throat constricted’;

Thinadjective

relatively thin in consistency or low in density; not viscous;

‘air is thin at high altitudes’; ‘a thin soup’; ‘skimmed milk is much thinner than whole milk’; ‘thin oil’;

Narrowadjective

not wide;

‘a narrow bridge’; ‘a narrow line across the page’;

Thinadjective

(of sound) lacking resonance or volume;

‘a thin feeble cry’;

Narrowadjective

limited in size or scope;

‘the narrow sense of a word’;

Thinadjective

lacking spirit or sincere effort;

‘a thin smile’;

Narrowadjective

lacking tolerance or flexibility or breadth of view;

‘a brilliant but narrow-minded judge’; ‘narrow opinions’;

Thinadverb

without viscosity;

‘the blood was flowing thin’;

Narrowadjective

very limited in degree;

‘won by a narrow margin’; ‘a narrow escape’;

Thinadjective

with opposite surfaces or sides that are close or relatively close together

‘a thin line of paint’; ‘thin slices of bread’;

Narrowadjective

characterized by painstaking care and detailed examination;

‘a minute inspection of the grounds’; ‘a narrow scrutiny’; ‘an exact and minute report’;

Thinadjective

(of a garment or other knitted or woven item) made of light material

‘his thin jacket’;

Thinadjective

(of a garment or fabric) having become less thick as a result of wear

‘our clothing was getting thin’;

Thinadjective

(of writing or printing) consisting of narrow lines

‘tall, thin lettering’;

Thinadjective

having little, or too little, flesh or fat on the body

‘a thin, gawky adolescent’;

Thinadjective

having few parts or members relative to the area covered or filled; sparse

‘a depressingly thin crowd’; ‘his hair was going thin’;

Thinadjective

(of the air or a substance in the air) not dense

‘the thin cold air of the mountains’;

Thinadjective

denoting a route on which the holds are small or scarce.

Thinadjective

(of a liquid substance) not containing much solid; flowing freely

‘thin soup’;

Thinadjective

lacking substance or quality; weak or inadequate

‘the evidence is rather thin’;

Thinadjective

(of a sound) faint and high-pitched

‘a thin, reedy little voice’;

Thinadjective

(of a smile) weak and forced.

Thinadverb

with little thickness or depth

‘a thin-sliced loaf’; ‘cut the ham as thin as possible’;

Thinverb

make or become less dense, crowded, or numerous

‘the trees began to thin out’; ‘the remorseless fire of archers thinned their ranks’;

Thinverb

remove some plants from (a row or area) to allow the others more room to grow

‘thin out the rows of peas’;

Thinverb

make or become more watery in consistency

‘if the soup is too thick, add a little water to thin it down’; ‘the blood thins’;

Thinverb

make or become smaller in thickness

‘their effect in thinning the ozone layer is probably slowing the global warming trend’;

Thinverb

hit (a ball) above its centre.

Popular Comparisons

Latest Comparisons

Trending Comparisons