VS.

Tall vs. High

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Talladjective

(of a person) Having a vertical extent greater than the average. For example, somebody with a height of over 6 feet would generally be considered to be tall.

‘Being tall is an advantage in basketball.’;

Highadjective

Very elevated; extending or being far above a base; tall; lofty.

‘The balloon rose high in the sky.’; ‘The wall was high.’; ‘a high mountain’;

Talladjective

(of a building, etc.) Having its top a long way up; having a great vertical (and often greater than horizontal) extent; high.

Highadjective

Pertaining to (or, especially of a language: spoken in) in an area which is at a greater elevation, for example more mountainous, than other regions.

Talladjective

(of a story) Hard to believe, such as a tall story or a tall tale.

Highadjective

Above the batter's shoulders.

‘the pitch (or: the ball) was high’;

Talladjective

A cup of coffee smaller than grande, usually 8 ounces. defined as a noun

Highadjective

Relatively elevated; rising or raised above the average or normal level from which elevation is measured.

Talladjective

(obsolete) Obsequious; obedient.

Highadjective

Having a specified elevation or height; tall.

‘three feet high’; ‘three Mount Everests high’;

Talladjective

(obsolete) Seemly; suitable; fitting, becoming, comely; attractive, handsome.

Highadjective

Elevated in status, esteem, prestige; exalted in rank, station, or character.

‘The oldest of the elves' royal family still conversed in High Elvish.’;

Talladjective

(obsolete) Bold; brave; courageous; valiant.

Highadjective

Most exalted; foremost.

‘the high priest, the high officials of the court, the high altar’;

Talladjective

(archaic) Fine; proper; admirable; great; excellent.

Highadjective

Of great importance and consequence: grave (if negative) or solemn (if positive).

‘high crimes, the high festival of the sun’;

Tallnoun

Someone or something that is tall.

Highadjective

Consummate; advanced (e.g. in development) to the utmost extent or culmination, or possessing a quality in its supreme degree, at its zenith.

‘high (i.e. intense) heat; high (i.e. full or quite) noon; high (i.e. rich or spicy) seasoning; high (i.e. complete) pleasure; high (i.e. deep or vivid) colour; high (i.e. extensive, thorough) scholarship; high tide; high [tourism] season; the High Middle Ages’;

Talladjective

High in stature; having a considerable, or an unusual, extension upward; long and comparatively slender; having the diameter or lateral extent small in proportion to the height; as, a tall person, tree, or mast.

‘Two of far nobler shape, erect and tall.’;

Highadjective

Advanced in complexity (and hence potentially abstract and/or difficult to comprehend).

Talladjective

Brave; bold; courageous.

‘As tall a trenchermanAs e'er demolished a pye fortification.’; ‘His companions, being almost in despair of victory, were suddenly recomforted by Sir William Stanley, which came to succors with three thousand tall men.’;

Highadjective

(in several set phrases) Remote in distance or time.

‘high latitude, high antiquity’;

Talladjective

Fine; splendid; excellent; also, extravagant; excessive.

Highadjective

(in several set phrases) Very traditionalist and conservative, especially in favoring older ways of doing things; see e.g. high church, High Tory.

Talladjective

great in vertical dimension; high in stature;

‘tall people’; ‘tall buildings’; ‘tall trees’; ‘tall ships’;

Highadjective

Elevated in mood; marked by great merriment, excitement, etc.

‘in high spirits’;

Talladjective

lofty in style;

‘he engages in so much tall talk, one never really realizes what he is saying’;

Highadjective

(of a lifestyle) Luxurious; rich.

‘high living, the high life’;

Talladjective

impressively difficult;

‘a tall order’;

Highadjective

Lofty, often to the point of arrogant, haughty, boastful, proud.

‘a high tone’;

Talladjective

too improbable to admit of belief;

‘a tall story’;

Highadjective

(with "on" or "about") Keen, enthused.

Talladjective

of great or more than average height, especially (with reference to an object) relative to width

‘a tall, broad-shouldered man’; ‘a tall glass of iced tea’;

Highadjective

With tall waves.

Talladjective

(after a measurement and in questions) measuring a specified distance from top to bottom

‘how tall are you?’; ‘he was over six feet tall’;

Highadjective

Large, great (in amount or quantity, value, force, energy, etc).

‘My bank charges me a high interest rate.’; ‘I was running a high temperature and had high cholesterol.’; ‘high voltage’; ‘high prices’; ‘high winds’; ‘a high number’;

Highadjective

Having a large or comparatively larger concentration of (a substance, which is often but not always linked by "in" when predicative).

‘Carrots are high in vitamin A.’; ‘made from a high-copper alloy’;

Highadjective

(acoustics) Acute or shrill in pitch, due to being of greater frequency, i.e. produced by more rapid vibrations (wave oscillations).

‘The note was too high for her to sing.’;

Highadjective

(phonetics) Made with some part of the tongue positioned high in the mouth, relatively close to the palate.

Highadjective

(card games) Greater in value than other cards, denominations, suits, etc.

Highadjective

(poker) Having the highest rank in a straight, flush or straight flush.

‘I have KT742 of the same suit. In other words, a K-high flush.’; ‘9-high straight = 98765 unsuited’; ‘Royal Flush = AKQJT suited = A-high straight flush’;

Highadjective

(of a card or hand) Winning; able to take a trick, win a round, etc.

‘North's hand was high. East was in trouble.’;

Highadjective

Strong-scented; slightly tainted/spoiled; beginning to decompose.

‘Epicures do not cook game before it is high.’; ‘The tailor liked his meat high.’;

Highadjective

(slang) Intoxicated; under the influence of a mood-altering drug, formerly (until the early 20th century) usually alcohol, but now (by the mid 20th century) usually not alcohol but rather marijuana, cocaine, heroin, etc.

Highadjective

Near, in its direction of travel, to the (direction of the) wind.

Highadverb

In or to an elevated position.

‘How high above land did you fly?’;

Highadverb

In or at a great value.

‘Costs have grown higher this year again.’;

Highadverb

In a pitch of great frequency.

‘I certainly can't sing that high.’;

Highnoun

A high point or position, literally or figuratively; an elevated place; a superior region; a height; the sky; heaven.

Highnoun

A point of success or achievement; a time when things are at their best.

‘It was one of the highs of his career.’;

Highnoun

A period of euphoria, from excitement or from an intake of drugs.

‘That pill gave me a high for a few hours, before I had a comedown.’;

Highnoun

A drug that gives such a high.

Highnoun

(informal) A large area of elevated atmospheric pressure; an anticyclone.

‘A large high is centred on the Azores.’;

Highnoun

The maximum value attained by some quantity within a specified period.

‘Inflation reached a ten-year high.’;

Highnoun

The maximum atmospheric temperature recorded at a particular location, especially during one 24-hour period.

‘Today's high was 32°C.’;

Highnoun

(card games) The highest card dealt or drawn.

Highnoun

(obsolete) Thought; intention; determination; purpose.

Highverb

(obsolete) To rise.

‘The sun higheth.’;

Highverb

To hie; to hasten.

Highverb

To hie.

‘Men must high them apace, and make haste.’;

Highverb

To rise; as, the sun higheth.

Highadjective

Elevated above any starting point of measurement, as a line, or surface; having altitude; lifted up; raised or extended in the direction of the zenith; lofty; tall; as, a high mountain, tower, tree; the sun is high.

Highadjective

Regarded as raised up or elevated; distinguished; remarkable; conspicuous; superior; - used indefinitely or relatively, and often in figurative senses, which are understood from the connection

Highadjective

Elevated in character or quality, whether moral or intellectual; preëminent; honorable; as, high aims, or motives.

Highadjective

Possessing a characteristic quality in a supreme or superior degree; as, high (i. e., intense) heat; high (i. e., full or quite) noon; high (i. e., rich or spicy) seasoning; high (i. e., complete) pleasure; high (i. e., deep or vivid) color; high (i. e., extensive, thorough) scholarship, etc.

‘High time it is this war now ended were.’; ‘High sauces and spices are fetched from the Indies.’;

Highadjective

Exalted in social standing or general estimation, or in rank, reputation, office, and the like; dignified; as, she was welcomed in the highest circles.

‘He was a wight of high renown.’;

Highadjective

Strong-scented; slightly tainted; as, epicures do not cook game before it is high.

Highadjective

Of noble birth; illustrious; as, of high family.

Highadjective

Acute or sharp; - opposed to grave or low; as, a high note.

Highadjective

Of great strength, force, importance, and the like; strong; mighty; powerful; violent; sometimes, triumphant; victorious; majestic, etc.; as, a high wind; high passions.

‘Strong is thy hand, and high is thy right hand.’; ‘Can heavenly minds such high resentment show?’;

Highadjective

Made with a high position of some part of the tongue in relation to the palate, as ē (ēve), Ō (fŌd). See Guide to Pronunciation, 10, 11.

Highadjective

Very abstract; difficult to comprehend or surmount; grand; noble.

‘Both meet to hear and answer such high things.’; ‘Plain living and high thinking are no more.’;

Highadjective

Costly; dear in price; extravagant; as, to hold goods at a high price.

‘If they must be good at so high a rate, they know they may be safe at a cheaper.’;

Highadjective

Arrogant; lofty; boastful; proud; ostentatious; - used in a bad sense.

‘An high look and a proud heart . . . is sin.’; ‘His forces, after all the high discourses, amounted really but to eighteen hundred foot.’;

Highadverb

In a high manner; in a high place; to a great altitude; to a great degree; largely; in a superior manner; eminently; powerfully.

Highnoun

An elevated place; a superior region; a height; the sky; heaven.

Highnoun

People of rank or high station; as, high and low.

Highnoun

The highest card dealt or drawn.

‘The dayspring from on high hath visited us.’;

Highnoun

a lofty level or position or degree;

‘summer temperatures reached an all-time high’;

Highnoun

an air mass of higher than normal pressure;

‘the east coast benefits from a Bermuda high’;

Highnoun

a state of sustained elation;

‘I'm on a permanent high these days’;

Highnoun

a state of altered consciousness induced by alcohol or narcotics;

‘they took drugs to get a high on’;

Highnoun

a high place;

‘they stood on high and observed the coutryside’; ‘he doesn't like heights’;

Highnoun

a public secondary school usually including grades 9 through 12;

‘he goes to the neighborhood highschool’;

Highnoun

a forward gear with a gear ratio giving high vehicle velocity for a given engine speed

Highadjective

greater than normal in degree or intensity or amount;

‘a high temperature’; ‘a high price’; ‘the high point of his career’; ‘high risks’; ‘has high hopes’; ‘the river is high’; ‘he has a high opinion of himself’;

Highadjective

(literal meanings) being at or having a relatively great or specific elevation or upward extension (sometimes used in combinations like `knee-high');

‘a high mountain’; ‘high ceilings’; ‘high buildings’; ‘a high forehead’; ‘a high incline’; ‘a foot high’;

Highadjective

standing above others in quality or position;

‘people in high places’; ‘the high priest’; ‘eminent members of the community’;

Highadjective

used of sounds and voices; high in pitch or frequency

Highadjective

happy and excited and energetic

Highadjective

used of the smell of game beginning to taint

Highadjective

slightly and pleasantly intoxicated from alcohol or a drug (especially marijuana)

Highadverb

at a great altitude;

‘he climbed high on the ladder’;

Highadverb

in or to a high position, amount, or degree;

‘prices have gone up far too high’;

Highadverb

in a rich manner;

‘he lives high’;

Highadverb

far up toward the source;

‘he lives high up the river’;

Highadjective

of great vertical extent

‘the top of a high mountain’;

Highadjective

(after a measurement and in questions) measuring a specified distance from top to bottom

‘a tree forty feet high’;

Highadjective

far above ground, sea level, or another point of reference

‘a palace high up on a hill’;

Highadjective

extending above the normal level

‘a round face with a high forehead’;

Highadjective

(of an area) inland and well above sea level

‘high prairies’;

Highadjective

performed at, to, or from a considerable height

‘high diving’;

Highadjective

(of latitude) close to 90°; near the North or South Pole

‘high southern latitudes’;

Highadjective

great, or greater than normal, in quantity, size, or intensity

‘a high temperature’; ‘sweets are very high in calories’;

Highadjective

of large numerical or monetary value

‘they had been playing for high stakes’;

Highadjective

very favourable

‘she had no very high opinion of men’;

Highadjective

extreme in religious or political views

‘a man of high Tory opinions’;

Highadjective

(of a period or movement) at its peak

‘high summer’;

Highadjective

great in rank, status, or importance

‘both held high office under Lloyd George’; ‘financial security is high on your list of priorities’;

Highadjective

ranking above others of the same kind

‘the last High King of Ireland’;

Highadjective

morally or culturally superior

‘blurring the distinctions between high art and popular art’;

Highadjective

(of a sound or note) having a frequency at the upper end of the auditory range

‘a high, squeaky voice’;

Highadjective

(of a singer or instrument) producing notes of relatively high pitch

‘a high soprano voice’;

Highadjective

feeling euphoric, especially from the effects of drugs or alcohol

‘some of them were high on Ecstasy’; ‘she wasn't tipsy, just a little high’;

Highadjective

(especially of food) unpleasantly strong-smelling because beginning to go bad

‘it's a type of preserved butter, used for cooking, smells a little high’;

Highadjective

(of game) slightly decomposed and so ready to cook.

Highadjective

(of a vowel) produced with the tongue relatively near the palate.

Highnoun

a high point, level, or figure

‘commodity prices were at a rare high’;

Highnoun

a high-frequency sound or musical note

‘piercing highs and subterranean lows’;

Highnoun

a high power setting

‘the vent blower was on high’;

Highnoun

an area of high barometric pressure; an anticyclone.

Highnoun

top gear in a motor vehicle

‘the system lets you shift into 4WD high’;

Highnoun

a notably happy or successful moment

‘the highs and lows of life’;

Highnoun

a state of high spirits or euphoria

‘golf provides him with an adrenalin high’; ‘if the stable is doing well then everybody's on a high’;

Highnoun

high school

‘I go to junior high’;

Highadverb

at or to a considerable or specified height

‘the sculpture stood about five feet high’; ‘a dish piled high with baked beans’;

Highadverb

highly

‘he ranked high among the pioneers of chemical technology’;

Highadverb

at a high price

‘buying shares low and selling them high’;

Highadverb

(of a sound) at or to a high pitch

‘my voice went high with excitement’;

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