VS.

Stack vs. Heap

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Stacknoun

(heading) A pile.

Heapnoun

A crowd; a throng; a multitude or great number of people.

Stacknoun

A large pile of hay, grain, straw, or the like, larger at the bottom than the top, sometimes covered with thatch.

Heapnoun

A pile or mass; a collection of things laid in a body, or thrown together so as to form an elevation.

‘a heap of earth or stones’;

Stacknoun

A pile of similar objects, each directly on top of the last.

‘Please bring me a chair from that stack in the corner.’;

Heapnoun

A great number or large quantity of things.

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Stacknoun

(UK) A pile of poles or wood, indefinite in quantity.

Heapnoun

(computing) A data structure consisting of trees in which each node is greater than all its children.

Stacknoun

A pile of wood containing 108 cubic feet. (~3 m³)

Heapnoun

(computing) Memory that is dynamically allocated.

‘You should move these structures from the stack to the heap to avoid a potential stack overflow.’;

Stacknoun

An extensive collection

Heapnoun

(colloquial) A dilapidated place or vehicle.

‘My first car was an old heap.’;

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Stacknoun

A smokestack.

Heapnoun

(colloquial) A lot, a large amount

‘Thanks a heap!’;

Stacknoun

(heading) In digital computing.

Heapverb

(transitive) To pile in a heap.

‘He heaped the laundry upon the bed and began folding.’;

Stacknoun

A linear data structure in which the last data item stored is the first retrieved; a LIFO queue.

Heapverb

(transitive) To form or round into a heap, as in measuring.

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Stacknoun

A portion of computer memory occupied by a stack data structure, particularly (the stack) that portion of main memory manipulated during machine language procedure call related instructions.

Heapverb

(transitive) To supply in great quantity.

‘They heaped praise upon their newest hero.’;

Stacknoun

A standard set of software components commonly used together on a system – for example, the combination of an operating system, web server, database and programming language.

Heapnoun

A crowd; a throng; a multitude or great number of persons.

‘The wisdom of a heap of learned men.’; ‘A heap of vassals and slaves.’; ‘He had heaps of friends.’;

Stacknoun

(math) A generalization of schemes in algebraic geometry and of sheaves.

Heapnoun

A great number or large quantity of things not placed in a pile; as, a heap of trouble.

‘A vast heap, both of places of scripture and quotations.’; ‘I have noticed a heap of things in my life.’;

Stacknoun

(geology) A coastal landform, consisting of a large vertical column of rock in the sea.

Heapnoun

A pile or mass; a collection of things laid in a body, or thrown together so as to form an elevation; as, a heap of earth or stones.

‘Huge heaps of slain around the body rise.’;

Stacknoun

(library) Compactly spaced bookshelves used to house large collections of books.

Heapverb

To collect in great quantity; to amass; to lay up; to accumulate; - usually with up; as, to heap up treasures.

‘Though he heap up silver as the dust.’;

Stacknoun

(figuratively) A large amount of an object.

‘They paid him a stack of money to keep quiet.’;

Heapverb

To throw or lay in a heap; to make a heap of; to pile; as, to heap stones; - often with up; as, to heap up earth; or with on; as, to heap on wood or coal.

Stacknoun

(military) A pile of rifles or muskets in a cone shape.

Heapverb

To form or round into a heap, as in measuring; to fill (a measure) more than even full.

Stacknoun

(poker) The amount of money a player has on the table.

Heapnoun

a collection of objects laid on top of each other

Stacknoun

(heading) In architecture.

Heapnoun

(often followed by `of') a large number or amount or extent;

‘a batch of letters’; ‘a deal of trouble’; ‘a lot of money’; ‘he made a mint on the stock market’; ‘it must have cost plenty’;

Stacknoun

A number of flues embodied in one structure, rising above the roof.

Heapnoun

a car that is old and unreliable;

‘the fenders had fallen off that old bus’;

Stacknoun

A vertical drainpipe.

Heapverb

bestow in large quantities;

‘He heaped him with work’; ‘She heaped scorn upon him’;

Stacknoun

A fall or crash, a prang.

Heapverb

arrange in stacks;

‘heap firewood around the fireplace’; ‘stack your books up on the shelves’;

Stacknoun

(bodybuilding) A blend of various dietary supplements or anabolic steroids with supposed synergistic benefits.

Heapverb

fill to overflow;

‘heap the platter with potatoes’;

Stackverb

(transitive) To arrange in a stack, or to add to an existing stack.

‘Please stack those chairs in the corner.’;

Stackverb

To arrange the cards in a deck in a particular manner.

‘This is the third hand in a row where you've drawn four of a kind. Someone is stacking the deck!’;

Stackverb

To take all the money another player currently has on the table.

‘I won Jill's last $100 this hand; I stacked her!’;

Stackverb

(transitive) To deliberately distort the composition of (an assembly, committee, etc.).

‘The Government was accused of stacking the parliamentary committee.’;

Stackverb

To crash; to fall.

‘Jim couldn′t make it today as he stacked his car on the weekend.’;

Stacknoun

A large and to some degree orderly pile of hay, grain, straw, or the like, usually of a nearly conical form, but sometimes rectangular or oblong, contracted at the top to a point or ridge, and sometimes covered with thatch.

‘But corn was housed, and beans were in the stack.’;

Stacknoun

An orderly pile of any type of object, indefinite in quantity; - used especially of piles of wood. A stack is usually more orderly than a pile

‘Against every pillar was a stack of billets above a man's height.’;

Stacknoun

A pile of wood containing 108 cubic feet.

Stacknoun

A large quantity; as, a stack of cash.

Stacknoun

A number of flues embodied in one structure, rising above the roof.

Stacknoun

A section of memory in a computer used for temporary storage of data, in which the last datum stored is the first retrieved.

Stacknoun

The section of a library containing shelves which hold books less frequently requested.

Stackverb

To lay in a conical or other pile; to make into a large pile; as, to stack hay, cornstalks, or grain; to stack or place wood.

Stackverb

To place in a vertical arrangement so that each item in a pile is resting on top of another item in the pile, except for the bottom item; as, to stack the papers neatly on the desk; to stack the bricks.

Stackverb

To select or arrange dishonestly so as to achieve an unfair advantage; as, to stack a deck of cards; to stack a jury with persons prejudiced against the defendant.

Stacknoun

an orderly pile

Stacknoun

(often followed by `of') a large number or amount or extent;

‘a batch of letters’; ‘a deal of trouble’; ‘a lot of money’; ‘he made a mint on the stock market’; ‘it must have cost plenty’;

Stacknoun

a list in which the next item to be removed is the item most recently stored (LIFO)

Stacknoun

a large tall chimney through which combustion gases and smoke can be evacuated

Stacknoun

a storage device that handles data so that the next item to be retrieved is the item most recently stored (LIFO)

Stackverb

load or cover with stacks;

‘stack a truck with boxes’;

Stackverb

arrange in stacks;

‘heap firewood around the fireplace’; ‘stack your books up on the shelves’;

Stackverb

arrange the order of so as to increase one's winning chances;

‘stack the deck of cards’;

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