VS.

Saute vs. Sear

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Saute

p. p. of Sauter.

Searadjective

Dry; withered, especially of vegetation.

Sauteverb

fry briefly over high heat;

‘saute the onions’;

Searverb

(transitive) To char, scorch, or burn the surface of (something) with a hot instrument.

Sauteadjective

fried quickly in a little fat

Searverb

To wither; to dry up.

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Searverb

To make callous or insensible.

Searverb

To mark permanently, as if by burning.

‘The events of that day were seared into her memory.’;

Searnoun

A scar produced by searing

Searnoun

Part of a gun that retards the hammer until the trigger is pulled.

Searadjective

Dry; withered; no longer green; - applied to leaves.

‘I have lived long enough; my way of lifeIs fall'n into the sear, the yellow leaf.’;

Searverb

To wither; to dry up.

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Searverb

To burn (the surface of) to dryness and hardness; to cauterize; to expose to a degree of heat such as changes the color or the hardness and texture of the surface; to scorch; to make callous; as, to sear the skin or flesh. Also used figuratively.

‘I'm seared with burning steel.’; ‘It was in vain that the amiable divine tried to give salutary pain to that seared conscience.’; ‘The discipline of war, being a discipline in destruction of life, is a discipline in callousness. Whatever sympathies exist are seared.’;

Searnoun

The catch in a gunlock by which the hammer is held cocked or half cocked.

Searverb

make very hot and dry;

‘The heat scorched the countryside’;

Searverb

become superficially burned;

‘my eyebrows singed when I bent over the flames’;

Searverb

cause to wither or parch from exposure to heat;

‘The sun parched the earth’;

Searadjective

(used especially of vegetation) having lost all moisture;

‘dried-up grass’; ‘the desert was edged with sere vegetation’; ‘shriveled leaves on the unwatered seedlings’; ‘withered vines’;

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