Force vs. Intensity - What's the difference?

Wikipedia

  • Force

    In physics, a force is any interaction that, when unopposed, will change the motion of an object. A force can cause an object with mass to change its velocity (which includes to begin moving from a state of rest), i.e., to accelerate. Force can also be described intuitively as a push or a pull. A force has both magnitude and direction, making it a vector quantity. It is measured in the SI unit of newtons and represented by the symbol F. The original form of Newton's second law states that the net force acting upon an object is equal to the rate at which its momentum changes with time. If the mass of the object is constant, this law implies that the acceleration of an object is directly proportional to the net force acting on the object, is in the direction of the net force, and is inversely proportional to the mass of the object. Concepts related to force include: thrust, which increases the velocity of an object; drag, which decreases the velocity of an object; and torque, which produces changes in rotational speed of an object. In an extended body, each part usually applies forces on the adjacent parts; the distribution of such forces through the body is the internal mechanical stress. Such internal mechanical stresses cause no acceleration of that body as the forces balance one another. Pressure, the distribution of many small forces applied over an area of a body, is a simple type of stress that if unbalanced can cause the body to accelerate. Stress usually causes deformation of solid materials, or flow in fluids.

Wiktionary

  • Force (noun)

    Strength or energy of body or mind; active power; vigour; might; capacity of exercising an influence or producing an effect.

    "the force of an appeal, an argument, or a contract"

  • Force (noun)

    Power exerted against will or consent; compulsory power; violence; coercion.

  • Force (noun)

    Anything that is able to make a big change in a person or thing.

  • Force (noun)

    A physical quantity that denotes ability to push, pull, twist or accelerate a body and which has a direction and is measured in a unit dimensioned in mass × distance/time² (ML/T²): SI: newton (N); CGS: dyne (dyn)

  • Force (noun)

    Something or anything that has the power to produce a physical effect upon something else, such as causing it to move or change shape.

  • Force (noun)

    A group that aims to attack, control, or constrain.

    "police force"

  • Force (noun)

    The ability to attack, control, or constrain.

    "show of force"

  • Force (noun)

    A magic trick in which the outcome is known to the magician beforehand, especially one involving the apparent free choice of a card by another person.

  • Force (noun)

    Legal validity.

    "The law will come into force in January."

  • Force (noun)

    Either unlawful violence, as in a "forced entry", or lawful compulsion.

  • Force (noun)

    Ability of an effect a given meaning.

  • Force (noun)

    A binding, metaphysical, and ubiquitous power in the fictional Star Wars universe created by George Lucas.

  • Force (noun)

    A waterfall or cascade.

  • Force (verb)

    To violate (a woman); to rape. from 14thc.

  • Force (verb)

    To exert oneself, to do one's utmost. from 14thc.

  • Force (verb)

    To compel (someone or something) to do something. from 15thc.

  • Force (verb)

    To constrain by force; to overcome the limitations or resistance of. from 16thc.

  • Force (verb)

    To drive (something) by force, to propel (generally + prepositional phrase or adverb). from 16thc.

  • Force (verb)

    To cause to occur (despite inertia, resistance etc.); to produce through force. from 16thc.

    "The comedian's jokes weren't funny, but I forced a laugh now and then."

  • Force (verb)

    To forcibly open (a door, lock etc.). from 17thc.

    "To force a lock."

  • Force (verb)

    To obtain or win by strength; to take by violence or struggle; specifically, to capture by assault; to storm, as a fortress.

  • Force (verb)

    To create an out by touching a base in advance of a runner who has no base to return to while in possession of a ball which has already touched the ground.

    "Jones forced the runner at second by stepping on the bag."

  • Force (verb)

    To compel (an adversary or partner) to trump a trick by leading a suit that he/she does not hold.

  • Force (verb)

    To put in force; to cause to be executed; to make binding; to enforce.

  • Force (verb)

    To provide with forces; to reinforce; to strengthen by soldiers; to man; to garrison.

  • Force (verb)

    To allow the force of; to value; to care for.

  • Force (verb)

    To stuff; to lard; to farce.

  • Intensity (noun)

    The quality of being intense.

  • Intensity (noun)

    The degree of strength.

  • Intensity (noun)

    Time-averaged energy flux (the ratio of average power to the area through which the power "flows"); irradiance.

  • Intensity (noun)

    Can mean any of radiant intensity, luminous intensity or irradiance.

  • Intensity (noun)

    synonym of radiance.

  • Intensity (noun)

    The severity of an earthquake in terms of its effects on the earth's surface, and buildings. The value depends on the distance from the epicentre, and is not to be confused with the magnitude.

Oxford Dictionary

  • Force (noun)

    strength or energy as an attribute of physical action or movement

    "he was thrown backwards by the force of the explosion"

  • Force (noun)

    an influence tending to change the motion of a body or produce motion or stress in a stationary body. The magnitude of such an influence is often calculated by multiplying the mass of the body and its acceleration.

  • Force (noun)

    used with a number as a measure of wind strength on the Beaufort scale

    "a force-nine gale"

  • Force (noun)

    coercion or compulsion, especially with the use or threat of violence

    "they ruled by law and not by force"

  • Force (noun)

    mental or moral strength or power

    "the force of popular opinion"

  • Force (noun)

    a person or thing regarded as exerting power or influence

    "he might still be a force for peace and unity"

  • Force (noun)

    the powerful effect of something

    "the Committee accepted the force of this argument"

  • Force (noun)

    an organized body of military personnel or police

    "a British peacekeeping force"

  • Force (noun)

    troops and weaponry

    "a battle between the forces of good and evil"

    "left-wing guerrilla forces"

  • Force (noun)

    the army, navy, and air force of a country.

  • Force (noun)

    the police.

  • Force (noun)

    a group of people brought together and organized for a particular activity

    "a sales force"

  • Force (noun)

    a waterfall.

  • Force (verb)

    make a way through or into by physical strength; break open by force

    "the back door of the bank was forced"

  • Force (verb)

    drive or push into a specified position or state using physical strength or against resistance

    "thieves tried to force open the cash register"

    "Mark forced her arms back above her head"

  • Force (verb)

    achieve or bring about (something) by effort

    "Sabine forced a smile"

    "they forced a way through the crowd"

  • Force (verb)

    artificially hasten the development or maturity of (a plant).

  • Force (verb)

    make (someone) do something against their will

    "the universities were forced to cut staff"

    "she was forced into early retirement"

  • Force (verb)

    put out (a runner) by necessitating an advance to the next base when it is not possible to do so safely.

Webster Dictionary

  • Force

    To stuff; to lard; to farce.

  • Force

    To constrain to do or to forbear, by the exertion of a power not resistible; to compel by physical, moral, or intellectual means; to coerce; as, masters force slaves to labor.

  • Force

    To compel, as by strength of evidence; as, to force conviction on the mind.

  • Force

    To do violence to; to overpower, or to compel by violence to one's will; especially, to ravish; to violate; to commit rape upon.

  • Force

    To obtain, overcome, or win by strength; to take by violence or struggle; specifically, to capture by assault; to storm, as a fortress; as, to force the castle; to force a lock.

  • Force

    To impel, drive, wrest, extort, get, etc., by main strength or violence; - with a following adverb, as along, away, from, into, through, out, etc.

  • Force

    To put in force; to cause to be executed; to make binding; to enforce.

  • Force

    To exert to the utmost; to urge; hence, to strain; to urge to excessive, unnatural, or untimely action; to produce by unnatural effort; as, to force a conceit or metaphor; to force a laugh; to force fruits.

  • Force

    To compel (an adversary or partner) to trump a trick by leading a suit of which he has none.

  • Force

    To provide with forces; to reënforce; to strengthen by soldiers; to man; to garrison.

  • Force

    To allow the force of; to value; to care for.

  • Force (noun)

    A waterfall; a cascade.

  • Force (noun)

    Capacity of exercising an influence or producing an effect; strength or energy of body or mind; active power; vigor; might; often, an unusual degree of strength or energy; especially, power to persuade, or convince, or impose obligation; pertinency; validity; special signification; as, the force of an appeal, an argument, a contract, or a term.

  • Force (noun)

    Power exerted against will or consent; compulsory power; violence; coercion; as, by force of arms; to take by force.

  • Force (noun)

    Strength or power for war; hence, a body of land or naval combatants, with their appurtenances, ready for action; - an armament; troops; warlike array; - often in the plural; hence, a body of men prepared for action in other ways; as, the laboring force of a plantation; the armed forces.

  • Force (noun)

    Strength or power exercised without law, or contrary to law, upon persons or things; violence.

  • Force (noun)

    Any action between two bodies which changes, or tends to change, their relative condition as to rest or motion; or, more generally, which changes, or tends to change, any physical relation between them, whether mechanical, thermal, chemical, electrical, magnetic, or of any other kind; as, the force of gravity; cohesive force; centrifugal force.

  • Force (verb)

    To use violence; to make violent effort; to strive; to endeavor.

  • Force (verb)

    To make a difficult matter of anything; to labor; to hesitate; hence, to force of, to make much account of; to regard.

  • Force (verb)

    To be of force, importance, or weight; to matter.

  • Intensity (noun)

    The state or quality of being intense; intenseness; extreme degree; as, intensity of heat, cold, mental application, passion, etc.

  • Intensity (noun)

    The amount or degree of energy with which a force operates or a cause acts; effectiveness, as estimated by results produced.

  • Intensity (noun)

    The magnitude of a distributed force, as pressure, stress, weight, etc., per unit of surface, or of volume, as the case may be; as, the measure of the intensity of a total stress of forty pounds which is distributed uniformly over a surface of four square inches area is ten pounds per square inch.

  • Intensity (noun)

    The degree or depth of color or shade in a picture.

Princeton's WordNet

  • Force (noun)

    a unit that is part of some military service;

    "he sent Caesar a force of six thousand men"

  • Force (noun)

    one possessing or exercising power or influence or authority;

    "the mysterious presence of an evil power"

    "may the force be with you"

    "the forces of evil"

  • Force (noun)

    (physics) the influence that produces a change in a physical quantity;

    "force equals mass times acceleration"

  • Force (noun)

    group of people willing to obey orders;

    "a public force is necessary to give security to the rights of citizens"

  • Force (noun)

    a powerful effect or influence;

    "the force of his eloquence easily persuaded them"

  • Force (noun)

    an act of aggression (as one against a person who resists);

    "he may accomplish by craft in the long run what he cannot do by force and violence in the short one"

  • Force (noun)

    physical energy or intensity;

    "he hit with all the force he could muster"

    "it was destroyed by the strength of the gale"

    "a government has not the vitality and forcefulness of a living man"

  • Force (noun)

    a group of people having the power of effective action;

    "he joined forces with a band of adventurers"

  • Force (noun)

    (of a law) having legal validity;

    "the law is still in effect"

  • Force (verb)

    to cause to do through pressure or necessity, by physical, moral or intellectual means :

    "She forced him to take a job in the city"

    "He squeezed her for information"

  • Force (verb)

    urge or force (a person) to an action; constrain or motivate

  • Force (verb)

    move with force,

    "He pushed the table into a corner"

  • Force (verb)

    impose or thrust urgently, importunately, or inexorably;

    "She forced her diet fads on him"

  • Force (verb)

    squeeze like a wedge into a tight space;

    "I squeezed myself into the corner"

  • Force (verb)

    force into or from an action or state, either physically or metaphorically;

    "She rammed her mind into focus"

    "He drives me mad"

  • Force (verb)

    do forcibly; exert force;

    "Don't force it!"

  • Force (verb)

    cause to move along the ground by pulling;

    "draw a wagon"

    "pull a sled"

  • Force (verb)

    take by force;

    "Storm the fort"

  • Intensity (noun)

    the amount of energy transmitted (as by acoustic or electromagnetic radiation);

    "he adjusted the intensity of the sound"

    "they measured the station's signal strength"

  • Intensity (noun)

    high level or degree; the property of being intense

  • Intensity (noun)

    the magnitude of sound (usually in a specified direction);

    "the kids played their music at full volume"

  • Intensity (noun)

    chromatic purity: freedom from dilution with white and hence vividness of hue

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