VS.

Confidence vs. Faith

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Confidencenoun

Self-assurance.

Faithnoun

The process of forming or understanding abstractions, ideas, or beliefs, without empirical evidence, experience or observation.

‘I have faith that my prayers will be answered.’; ‘I have faith in the healing power of crystals.’;

Confidencenoun

A feeling of certainty; firm trust or belief; faith.

Faithnoun

A religious belief system.

‘The Christian faith.’;

Confidencenoun

Information held in secret.

Faithnoun

An obligation of loyalty or fidelity and the observance of such an obligation.

‘He acted in good faith to restore broken diplomatic ties after defeating the incumbent.’;

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Confidencenoun

(dated) Boldness; presumption.

Faithnoun

A trust or confidence in the intentions or abilities of a person, object, or ideal.

‘I have faith in the goodness of my fellow man.’; ‘You need to have faith in yourself, that you can overcome your shortcomings and become a good person.’;

Confidencenoun

The act of confiding, trusting, or putting faith in; trust; reliance; belief; - formerly followed by of, now commonly by in.

‘Society is built upon trust, and trust upon confidence of one another's integrity.’; ‘A cheerful confidence in the mercy of God.’;

Faithnoun

(obsolete) Credibility or truth.

Confidencenoun

That in which faith is put or reliance had.

‘The Lord shall be thy confidence.’;

Faithnoun

Belief; the assent of the mind to the truth of what is declared by another, resting solely and implicitly on his authority and veracity; reliance on testimony.

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Confidencenoun

Trustful; without fear or suspicion; frank; unreserved.

‘Be confident to speak, Northumberland;We three are but thyself.’;

Faithnoun

The assent of the mind to the statement or proposition of another, on the ground of the manifest truth of what he utters; firm and earnest belief, on probable evidence of any kind, especially in regard to important moral truth.

‘Faith, that is, fidelity, - the fealty of the finite will and understanding to the reason.’;

Confidencenoun

The state of mind characterized by one's reliance on himself, or his circumstances; a feeling of self-sufficiency; such assurance as leads to a feeling of security; self-reliance; - often with self prefixed.

‘Your wisdom is consumed in confidence;Do not go forth to-day.’; ‘But confidence then bore thee on secureEither to meet no danger, or to findMatter of glorious trial.’;

Faithnoun

The belief in the historic truthfulness of the Scripture narrative, and the supernatural origin of its teachings, sometimes called historical and speculative faith.

‘Without faith it is impossible to please him [God].’; ‘The faith of the gospel is that emotion of the mind which is called "trust" or "confidence" exercised toward the moral character of God, and particularly of the Savior.’; ‘Faith is an affectionate, practical confidence in the testimony of God.’;

Confidencenoun

Having self-reliance; bold; undaunted.

‘As confident as is the falcon's flightAgainst a bird, do I with Mowbray fight.’;

Faithnoun

That which is believed on any subject, whether in science, politics, or religion; especially (Theol.), a system of religious belief of any kind; as, the Jewish or Mohammedan faith; the Christian faith; also, the creed or belief of a Christian society or church.

‘Which to believe of her,Must be a faith that reason without miracleCould never plant in me.’; ‘Now preacheth the faith which once he destroyed.’;

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Confidencenoun

Private conversation; (pl.) secrets shared; as, there were confidences between them.

‘Sir, I desire some confidence with you.’; ‘I am confident that very much be done.’;

Faithnoun

Fidelity to one's promises, or allegiance to duty, or to a person honored and beloved; loyalty.

‘Children in whom is no faith.’; ‘Whose failing, while her faith to me remains,I should conceal.’;

Confidencenoun

Having an excess of assurance; bold to a fault; dogmatical; impudent; presumptuous.

‘The fool rageth and is confident.’;

Faithnoun

Word or honor pledged; promise given; fidelity; as, he violated his faith.

‘For you aloneI broke me faith with injured Palamon.’;

Confidencenoun

Giving occasion for confidence.

‘The cause was more confident than the event was prosperous.’;

Faithnoun

Credibility or truth.

‘The faith of the foregoing narrative.’;

Confidencenoun

freedom from doubt; belief in yourself and your abilities;

‘his assurance in his superiority did not make him popular’; ‘after that failure he lost his confidence’; ‘she spoke with authority’;

Faithinterjection

By my faith; in truth; verily.

Confidencenoun

a feeling of trust (in someone or something);

‘I have confidence in our team’; ‘confidence is always borrowed, never owned’;

Faithnoun

a strong belief in a supernatural power or powers that control human destiny;

‘he lost his faith but not his morality’;

Confidencenoun

a state of confident hopefulness that events will be favorable;

‘public confidence in the economy’;

Faithnoun

complete confidence in a person or plan etc;

‘he cherished the faith of a good woman’; ‘the doctor-patient relationship is based on trust’;

Confidencenoun

a trustful relationship;

‘he took me into his confidence’; ‘he betrayed their trust’;

Faithnoun

institution to express belief in a divine power;

‘he was raised in the Baptist religion’; ‘a member of his own faith contradicted him’;

Confidencenoun

a secret that is confided or entrusted to another;

‘everyone trusted him with their confidences’; ‘the priest could not reveal her confidences’;

Faithnoun

loyalty or allegiance to a cause or a person;

‘keep the faith’; ‘they broke faith with their investors’;

Confidencenoun

the feeling or belief that one can have faith in or rely on someone or something

‘we had every confidence in the staff’; ‘he had gained the young man's confidence’;

Faith

Faith, derived from Latin fides and Old French feid, is confidence or trust in a person, thing, or concept. In the context of religion, one can define faith as .

‘belief in a god or in the doctrines or teachings of religion’;

Confidencenoun

the state of feeling certain about the truth of something

‘I can say with confidence that I have never before driven up this street’;

Confidencenoun

a feeling of self-assurance arising from an appreciation of one's own abilities or qualities

‘he would walk up those steps with a confidence he didn't feel’; ‘she's brimming with confidence’;

Confidencenoun

the telling of private matters or secrets with mutual trust

‘someone with whom you may raise your suspicions in confidence’;

Confidencenoun

a secret or private matter told to someone under a condition of trust

‘the girls exchanged confidences about their parents’;

Confidence

Confidence is a state of being clear-headed either that a hypothesis or prediction is correct or that a chosen course of action is the best or most effective. Confidence comes from a Latin word 'fidere' which means therefore, having self-confidence is having trust in one's self.

‘to trust’;

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