VS.

Harbor vs. Quay

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Harbornoun

Shelter, refuge.

Quaynoun

A mole, bank, or wharf, formed toward the sea, or at the side of a harbor, river, or other navigable water, for convenience in loading and unloading vessels.

Harbornoun

Any place of shelter.

‘The neighborhood is a well-known harbor for petty thieves.’;

Quayverb

To furnish with quays.

Harbornoun

(obsolete) A house of the zodiac, or the mansion of a heavenly body.

Quaynoun

wharf usually built parallel to the shoreline

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Harbornoun

A sheltered expanse of water, adjacent to land, in which ships may dock or anchor, especially for loading and unloading.

‘A harbor, even if it is a little harbor, is a good thing, since adventurers come into it as well as go out, and the life in it grows strong, because it takes something from the world, and has something to give in return - Sarah Orne Jewett’;

Harbornoun

A mixing box for materials in glass-working.

Harborverb

(transitive) To provide a harbor or safe place for.

‘The docks, which once harbored tall ships, now harbor only petty thieves.’;

Harborverb

(intransitive) To take refuge or shelter in a protected expanse of water.

‘The fleet harbored in the south.’;

Harborverb

(transitive) To hold or persistently entertain in one's thoughts or mind.

‘She harbors a conviction that her husband has a secret, criminal past.’;

Harbornoun

A station for rest and entertainment; a place of security and comfort; a refuge; a shelter.

‘[A grove] fair harbour that them seems.’; ‘For harbor at a thousand doors they knocked.’;

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Harbornoun

Specif.: A lodging place; an inn.

Harbornoun

The mansion of a heavenly body.

Harbornoun

A portion of a sea, a lake, or other large body of water, either landlocked or artificially protected so as to be a place of safety for vessels in stormy weather; a port or haven.

Harbornoun

A mixing box for materials.

Harborverb

To afford lodging to; to entertain as a guest; to shelter; to receive; to give a refuge to; to indulge or cherish (a thought or feeling, esp. an ill thought); as, to harbor a grudge.

‘Any place that harbors men.’; ‘The bare suspicion made it treason to harbor the person suspected.’; ‘Let not your gentle breast harbor one thought of outrage.’;

Harborverb

To lodge, or abide for a time; to take shelter, as in a harbor.

‘For this night let's harbor here in York.’;

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Harbornoun

a sheltered port where ships can take on or discharge cargo

Harbornoun

a place of refuge and comfort and security

Harborverb

maintain (a theory, thoughts, or feelings);

‘bear a grudge’; ‘entertain interesting notions’; ‘harbor a resentment’;

Harborverb

secretly shelter (as of fugitives or criminals)

Harborverb

keep in one's possession; of animals

Harborverb

hold back a thought or feeling about;

‘She is harboring a grudge against him’;

Harbor

A harbor (American English) or harbour (British English; see spelling differences) (synonym: haven) is a sheltered body of water where ships, boats, and barges can be docked. The term harbor is often used interchangeably with port, which is a man-made facility built for loading and unloading vessels and dropping off and picking up passengers.

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