VS.

Warehouse vs. Shed

Published:

Warehousenoun

A place for storing large amounts of products. In logistics, a place where products go to from the manufacturer before going to the retailer.

Shedverb

To part, separate or divide.

‘To shed something in two.’; ‘To shed the sheep from the lambs.’; ‘A metal comb shed her golden hair.’; ‘We are shed with each other by an enormous distance.’;

Warehouseverb

(transitive) To store in a warehouse or similar.

Shedverb

(ambitransitive) To part with, separate from, leave off; cast off, let fall, be divested of.

‘You must shed your fear of the unknown before you can proceed.’; ‘When we found the snake, it was in the process of shedding its skin.’;

Warehouseverb

(transitive) To confine (a person) to an institution for a long period.

Shedverb

To pour; to make flow.

ADVERTISEMENT

Warehouseverb

To acquire and then shelve, simply to prevent competitors from acquiring it.

‘the warehousing of syndicated TV shows’;

Shedverb

(transitive) To allow to flow or fall.

‘I didn't shed many tears when he left me.’; ‘A tarpaulin sheds water.’;

Warehousenoun

A storehouse for wares, or goods.

Shedverb

(transitive) To radiate, cast, give off (light); see also shed light on.

‘Can you shed any light on this problem?’;

Warehouseverb

To deposit or secure in a warehouse.

Shedverb

To pour forth, give off, impart.

ADVERTISEMENT

Warehouseverb

To place in the warehouse of the government or customhouse stores, to be kept until duties are paid.

Shedverb

To fall in drops; to pour.

Warehousenoun

a storehouse for goods and merchandise

Shedverb

To sprinkle; to intersperse; to cover.

Warehouseverb

store in a warehouse

Shedverb

(weaving) To divide, as the warp threads, so as to form a shed, or passageway, for the shuttle.

ADVERTISEMENT

Warehousenoun

a large building where raw materials or manufactured goods may be stored prior to their distribution for sale.

Shednoun

(weaving) An area between upper and lower warp yarns through which the weft is woven.

Warehousenoun

a large wholesale or retail store

‘a discount warehouse’;

Shednoun

(obsolete) A distinction or dividing-line.

Warehouseverb

store (goods) in a warehouse

‘the pallets were warehoused the following day’;

Shednoun

(obsolete) A parting in the hair.

Warehouseverb

place (imported goods) in a bonded warehouse pending the payment of import duty.

Shednoun

(obsolete) The top of the head.

Warehouseverb

place (a prisoner or a psychiatric patient) in a large, impersonal institution in which their problems are not satisfactorily addressed

‘our objective is not to warehouse prisoners but to help inmates build new lives’;

Shednoun

(obsolete) An area of land as distinguished from those around it.

Warehouse

A warehouse is a building for storing goods. Warehouses are used by manufacturers, importers, exporters, wholesalers, transport businesses, customs, etc.

Shednoun

A slight or temporary structure built to shade or shelter something; a structure usually open in front; an outbuilding; a hut.

‘a wagon shed; a wood shed; a garden shed’;

Shednoun

A large temporary open structure for reception of goods.

Shednoun

An automobile which is old, worn-out, slow, or otherwise of poor quality.

Shednoun

A British Rail Class 66 locomotive.

Shednoun

A slight or temporary structure built to shade or shelter something; a structure often open in front; an outbuilding; a hut; as, a wagon shed; a wood shed.

‘The first Aletes born in lowly shed.’; ‘Sheds of reeds which summer's heat repel.’;

Shednoun

A covered structure for housing aircraft; a hangar.

Shednoun

A parting; a separation; a division.

‘They say also that the manner of making the shed of newwedded wives' hair with the iron head of a javelin came up then likewise.’;

Shednoun

The act of shedding or spilling; - used only in composition, as in bloodshed.

Shednoun

That which parts, divides, or sheds; - used in composition, as in watershed.

Shednoun

The passageway between the threads of the warp through which the shuttle is thrown, having a sloping top and bottom made by raising and lowering the alternate threads.

Shedverb

To separate; to divide.

Shedverb

To part with; to throw off or give forth from one's self; to emit; to diffuse; to cause to emanate or flow; to pour forth or out; to spill; as, the sun sheds light; she shed tears; the clouds shed rain.

‘Did Romeo's hand shed Tybalt's blood?’; ‘Twice seven consenting years have shedTheir utmost bounty on thy head.’;

Shedverb

To let fall; to throw off, as a natural covering of hair, feathers, shell; to cast; as, fowls shed their feathers; serpents shed their skins; trees shed leaves.

Shedverb

To cause to flow off without penetrating; as, a tight roof, or covering of oiled cloth, sheeds water.

Shedverb

To sprinkle; to intersperse; to cover.

Shedverb

To divide, as the warp threads, so as to form a shed, or passageway, for the shuttle.

Shedverb

To fall in drops; to pour.

‘Such a rain down from the welkin shadde.’;

Shedverb

To let fall the parts, as seeds or fruit; to throw off a covering or envelope.

‘White oats are apt to shed most as they lie, and black as they stand.’;

Shednoun

an outbuilding with a single story; used for shelter or storage

Shedverb

get rid of;

‘he shed his image as a pushy boss’; ‘shed your clothes’;

Shedverb

pour out in drops or small quantities or as if in drops or small quantities;

‘shed tears’; ‘spill blood’; ‘God shed His grace on Thee’;

Shedverb

cause or allow (a solid substance) to flow or run out or over;

‘spill the beans all over the table’;

Shedverb

cast off hair, skin, horn, or feathers;

‘out dog sheds every Spring’;

Shedadjective

shed at an early stage of development;

‘most amphibians have caducous gills’; ‘the caducous calyx of a poppy’;

Shednoun

a simple roofed structure used for garden storage, to shelter animals, or as a workshop

‘a bicycle shed’; ‘a garden shed’;

Shednoun

a larger structure for storing or maintaining vehicles or other machinery

‘a shed is required for the three engines’;

Shednoun

a building for shearing sheep or milking cattle.

Shedverb

park (a vehicle) in a depot

‘the buses were temporarily shedded in that depot’;

Shedverb

(of a tree or other plant) allow (leaves or fruit) to fall to the ground

‘both varieties shed leaves in winter’;

Shedverb

(of a reptile, insect, etc.) allow (its skin or shell) to come off, to be replaced by another one that has grown underneath.

Shedverb

(of a mammal) lose (hair) as a result of moulting, disease, or age.

Shedverb

take off (clothes)

‘we shed our jackets’;

Shedverb

have the property of repelling (water or a similar substance).

Shedverb

discard (something undesirable, superfluous, or outdated)

‘many firms use relocation as an opportunity to shed jobs’;

Shedverb

cast or give off (light)

‘the full moon shed a watery light on the scene’;

Shedverb

accidentally allow (something) to fall off or spill

‘a lorry shed its load of steel bars’;

Shedverb

eliminate part of (an electrical power load) by disconnecting circuits.

Shed

A shed is typically a simple, single-story roofed structure in a back garden or on an allotment that is used for storage, hobbies, or as a workshop. Sheds vary considerably in their size and complexity of construction, from simple open-sided ones designed to cover bicycles or garden items to large wood-framed structures with shingled roofs, windows, and electrical outlets.

Warehouse Illustrations

Shed Illustrations

Popular Comparisons

Latest Comparisons

Trending Comparisons