VS.

Stride vs. Walk

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Strideverb

(intransitive) To walk with long steps.

Walkverb

(intransitive) To move on the feet by alternately setting each foot (or pair or group of feet, in the case of animals with four or more feet) forward, with at least one foot on the ground at all times. Compare run.

‘To walk briskly for an hour every day is to keep fit.’;

Strideverb

To stand with the legs wide apart; to straddle.

Walkverb

To "walk free", i.e. to win, or avoid, a criminal court case, particularly when actually guilty.

‘If you can’t present a better case, that robber is going to walk.’;

Strideverb

To pass over at a step; to step over.

Walkverb

Of an object, to go missing or be stolen.

‘If you leave your wallet lying around, it’s going to walk.’;

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Strideverb

To straddle; to bestride.

Walkverb

To walk off the field, as if given out, after the fielding side appeals and before the umpire has ruled; done as a matter of sportsmanship when the batsman believes he is out.

Stridenoun

A long step in walking.

Walkverb

(transitive) To travel (a distance) by walking.

‘I walk two miles to school every day.’; ‘The museum’s not far from here – you can walk it.’;

Stridenoun

The distance covered by a long step.

Walkverb

(transitive) To take for a walk or accompany on a walk.

‘I walk the dog every morning.’; ‘Will you walk me home?’;

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Stridenoun

(computing) The number of memory locations between successive elements in an array, pixels in a bitmap, etc.

Walkverb

To allow a batter to reach base by pitching four balls.

Stridenoun

(music genre) A jazz piano style of the 1920s and 1930s. The left hand characteristically plays a four-beat pulse with a single bass note, octave, seventh or tenth interval on the first and third beats, and a chord on the second and fourth beats.

Walkverb

(transitive) To move something by shifting between two positions, as if it were walking.

‘I carefully walked the ladder along the wall.’;

Strideverb

To walk with long steps, especially in a measured or pompous manner.

‘Mars in the middle of the shining shieldIs graved, and strides along the liquid field.’;

Walkverb

(transitive) To full; to beat cloth to give it the consistency of felt.

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Strideverb

To stand with the legs wide apart; to straddle.

Walkverb

(transitive) To traverse by walking (or analogous gradual movement).

‘I walked the streets aimlessly.’; ‘Debugging this computer program involved walking the heap.’;

Strideverb

To pass over at a step; to step over.

Walkverb

To operate the left and right throttles of (an aircraft) in alternation.

Strideverb

To straddle; to bestride.

‘I mean to stride your steed.’;

Walkverb

To leave, resign.

‘If we don't offer him more money he'll walk.’;

Stridenoun

The act of stridding; a long step; the space measured by a long step; as, a masculine stride.

‘God never meant that man should scale the heavensBy strides of human wisdom.’;

Walkverb

(transitive) To push (a vehicle) alongside oneself as one walks.

Stridenoun

a step in walking or running

Walkverb

To behave; to pursue a course of life; to conduct oneself.

Stridenoun

the distance covered by a step;

‘he stepped off ten paces from the old tree and began to dig’;

Walkverb

To be stirring; to be abroad; to go restlessly about; said of things or persons expected to remain quiet, such as a sleeping person, or the spirit of a dead person.

Stridenoun

significant progress (especially in the phrase

‘make strides’; ‘they made big strides in productivity’;

Walkverb

(obsolete) To be in motion; to act; to move.

Strideverb

walk with long steps;

‘He strode confidently across the hall’;

Walkverb

To put, keep, or train (a puppy) in a walk, or training area for dogfighting.

Strideverb

cover or traverse by taking long steps;

‘She strode several miles towards the woods’;

Walkverb

To move a guest to another hotel if their confirmed reservation is not available on day of check-in.

Walknoun

A trip made by walking.

‘I take a walk every morning’;

Walknoun

A distance walked.

‘It’s a long walk from my house to the library’;

Walknoun

(sports) An Olympic Games track event requiring that the heel of the leading foot touch the ground before the toe of the trailing foot leaves the ground.

Walknoun

A manner of walking; a person's style of walking.

‘The Ministry of Silly Walks is underfunded this year’;

Walknoun

A path, sidewalk/pavement or other maintained place on which to walk. Compare trail.

Walknoun

(poker) A situation where all players fold to the big blind, as their first action (instead of calling or raising), once they get their cards.

Walknoun

(baseball) An award of first base to a batter following four balls being thrown by the pitcher; known in the rules as a "base on balls".

‘The pitcher now has two walks in this inning alone’;

Walknoun

In coffee, coconut, and other plantations, the space between them.

Walknoun

An area of an estate planted with fruit-bearing trees.

Walknoun

(historical) A place for keeping and training puppies for dogfighting.

Walknoun

(historical) An enclosed area in which a gamecock is confined to prepare him for fighting.

Walknoun

(graph theory) A sequence of alternating vertices and edges, where each edge's endpoints are the preceding and following vertices in the sequence.

Walknoun

(colloquial) Something very easily accomplished; a walk in the park.

Walknoun

A cheque drawn on a bank that was not a member of the London Clearing and whose sort code was allocated on a one-off basis; they had to be "walked" (hand-delivered by messengers).

Walkverb

To move along on foot; to advance by steps; to go on at a moderate pace; specifically, of two-legged creatures, to proceed at a slower or faster rate, but without running, or lifting one foot entirely before the other touches the ground.

‘At the end of twelve months, he walked in the palace of the kingdom of Babylon.’; ‘When Peter was come down out of the ship, he walked on the water, to go to Jesus.’;

Walkverb

To move or go on the feet for exercise or amusement; to take one's exercise; to ramble.

Walkverb

To be stirring; to be abroad; to go restlessly about; - said of things or persons expected to remain quiet, as a sleeping person, or the spirit of a dead person; to go about as a somnambulist or a specter.

‘I have heard, but not believed, the spirits of the deadMay walk again.’; ‘When was it she last walked?’;

Walkverb

To be in motion; to act; to move; to wag.

‘Do you think I'd walk in any plot?’; ‘I heard a pen walking in the chimney behind the cloth.’;

Walkverb

To behave; to pursue a course of life; to conduct one's self.

‘We walk perversely with God, and he will walk crookedly toward us.’;

Walkverb

To move off; to depart.

‘He will make their cows and garrans to walk.’;

Walkverb

To pass through, over, or upon; to traverse; to perambulate; as, to walk the streets.

‘As we walk our earthly round.’;

Walkverb

To cause to walk; to lead, drive, or ride with a slow pace; as, to walk one's horses; to walk the dog.

Walkverb

To subject, as cloth or yarn, to the fulling process; to full.

Walkverb

To put or keep (a puppy) in a walk; to train (puppies) in a walk.

Walkverb

To move in a manner likened to walking.

‘She walked a spinning wheel into the house, making it use first one and then the other of its own spindling legs to achieve progression rather than lifting it by main force.’;

Walknoun

The act of walking, or moving on the feet with a slow pace; advance without running or leaping.

Walknoun

The act of walking for recreation or exercise; as, a morning walk; an evening walk.

Walknoun

Manner of walking; gait; step; as, we often know a person at a distance by his walk.

Walknoun

That in or through which one walks; place or distance walked over; a place for walking; a path or avenue prepared for foot passengers, or for taking air and exercise; way; road; hence, a place or region in which animals may graze; place of wandering; range; as, a sheep walk.

‘A woody mountain . . . with goodliest treesPlanted, with walks and bowers.’; ‘He had walk for a hundred sheep.’; ‘Amid the sound of steps that beatThe murmuring walks like rain.’;

Walknoun

A frequented track; habitual place of action; sphere; as, the walk of the historian.

‘The mountains are his walks.’; ‘He opened a boundless walk for his imagination.’;

Walknoun

Conduct; course of action; behavior.

Walknoun

The route or district regularly served by a vender; as, a milkman's walk.

Walknoun

In coffee, coconut, and other plantations, the space between them.

Walknoun

A place for keeping and training puppies.

Walknoun

the act of traveling by foot;

‘walking is a healthy form of exercise’;

Walknoun

(baseball) an advance to first base by a batter who receives four balls;

‘he worked the pitcher for a base on balls’;

Walknoun

manner of walking;

‘he had a funny walk’;

Walknoun

the act of walking somewhere;

‘he took a walk after lunch’;

Walknoun

a path set aside for walking;

‘after the blizzard he shoveled the front walk’;

Walknoun

a slow gait of a horse in which two feet are always on the ground

Walknoun

careers in general;

‘it happens in all walks of life’;

Walkverb

use one's feet to advance; advance by steps;

‘Walk, don't run!’; ‘We walked instead of driving’; ‘She walks with a slight limp’; ‘The patient cannot walk yet’; ‘Walk over to the cabinet’;

Walkverb

traverse or cover by walking;

‘Walk the tightrope’; ‘Paul walked the streets of Damascus’; ‘She walks 3 miles every day’;

Walkverb

accompany or escort;

‘I'll walk you to your car’;

Walkverb

obtain a base on balls

Walkverb

live or behave in a specified manner;

‘walk in sadness’;

Walkverb

take a walk; go for a walk; walk for pleasure;

‘The lovers held hands while walking’; ‘We like to walk every Sunday’;

Walkverb

give a base on balls to

Walkverb

be or act in association with;

‘We must walk with our dispossessed brothers and sisters’; ‘Walk with God’;

Walkverb

make walk;

‘He walks the horse up the mountain’; ‘Walk the dog twice a day’;

Walkverb

walk at a pace;

‘The horsese walked across the meadow’;

Walkverb

move at a regular pace by lifting and setting down each foot in turn, never having both feet off the ground at once

‘she turned and walked a few paces’; ‘I walked across the lawn’;

Walkverb

go on foot for recreation and exercise

‘you can walk in 21,000 acres of moorland’;

Walkverb

travel over (a route or area) on foot

‘the police department has encouraged officers to walk the beat’;

Walkverb

used to suggest that someone has achieved a state or position easily or undeservedly

‘no one has the right to walk straight into a well-paid job for life’;

Walkverb

move in a similar way to walking, but using one's hands or a support such as stilts

‘he could walk on his hands carrying a plate on one foot’;

Walkverb

(of a quadruped) proceed with the slowest gait, always having at least two feet on the ground at once.

Walkverb

ride (a horse) at the slowest pace

‘he walked his horse towards her’;

Walkverb

guide, accompany, or escort (someone) on foot

‘he walked her home to her door’; ‘a meeting to walk parents through the complaint process’;

Walkverb

take (a dog) out for exercise

‘she spotted a man walking his retriever’;

Walkverb

train and look after (a hound puppy).

Walkverb

(of a thing) go missing or be stolen

‘customers have to leave a deposit to ensure the beer glasses don't walk’;

Walkverb

abandon or suddenly withdraw from a job or commitment

‘he was in place as the male lead but walked at the eleventh hour’;

Walkverb

be released from suspicion or from a charge

‘had any of the others come clean during the trial, he might have walked’;

Walkverb

(of a batsman) leave the field without waiting to be given out by the umpire.

Walkverb

reach first base automatically after not hitting at four balls pitched outside the strike zone.

Walkverb

allow or enable (a batter) to walk.

Walkverb

(of a ghost) be visible; appear

‘the ghosts of Bannockburn walked abroad’;

Walkverb

live or behave in a particular way

‘walk humbly with your God’;

Walknoun

an act of travelling or an outing on foot

‘he was too restless to sleep, so he went out for a walk’;

Walknoun

used to indicate the time that it will take to reach a place on foot or the distance to be travelled

‘the library is within five minutes' walk’;

Walknoun

a route recommended or marked out for recreational walking

‘there are picnic places and waymarked walks’;

Walknoun

a path

‘the street lamps illuminated the riverside walk’;

Walknoun

the round followed by a postman

‘the first job is to sort the mail into routes or walks’;

Walknoun

an unhurried rate of movement on foot

‘they crossed the field at a leisurely walk’;

Walknoun

the slowest gait of an animal

‘she reined her horse to a slow walk’;

Walknoun

a person's manner of walking

‘the spring was back in his walk’;

Walknoun

a part of a forest under one keeper.

Walknoun

the place where a gamecock is kept.

Walknoun

a farm where a hound puppy is trained.

Walknoun

an instance of reaching first base automatically after not hitting at four balls pitched outside the strike zone.

Walknoun

a flock of snipe.

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