VS.

Spin vs. Turn

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Spinverb

(ergative) To rotate, revolve, gyrate (usually quickly); to partially or completely rotate to face another direction.

‘I spun myself around a few times.’; ‘Spin the ball on the floor.’; ‘She spun around and gave him a big smile.’;

Turnverb

(heading) to make a non-linear physical movement.

Spinverb

(transitive) To make yarn by twisting and winding fibers together.

‘They spin the cotton into thread.’;

Turnverb

(intransitive) Of a body, person, etc, to move around an axis through itself.

‘the Earth turns;’; ‘turn on the spot’;

Spinverb

To present, describe, or interpret, or to introduce a bias or slant, so as to give something a favorable or advantageous appearance.

Turnverb

(transitive) To change the direction or orientation of, especially by rotation.

‘Turn the knob clockwise.’;

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Spinverb

To make the ball move sideways when it bounces on the pitch.

Turnverb

(intransitive) to change one's direction of travel.

‘She turned right at the corner.’;

Spinverb

To move sideways when bouncing.

Turnverb

to change the course of.

Spinverb

(cooking) To form into thin strips or ribbons, as with sugar

Turnverb

(transitive) To shape (something) symmetrically by rotating it against a stationary cutting tool, as on a lathe.

‘She turned the table legs with care and precision.’;

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Spinverb

To form (a web, a cocoon, silk, etc.) from threads produced by the extrusion of a viscid, transparent liquid, which hardens on coming into contact with the air; said of the spider, the silkworm, etc.

Turnverb

(by extension) To give form to; to shape or mould; to adapt.

Spinverb

To shape, as malleable sheet metal, into a hollow form, by bending or buckling it by pressing against it with a smooth hand tool or roller while the metal revolves, as in a lathe.

Turnverb

(transitive) To position (something) by folding it, or using its folds.

‘turn the bed covers;’; ‘turn the pages’;

Spinverb

To move swiftly.

‘to spin along the road in a carriage, on a bicycle, etc.’;

Turnverb

To navigate through a book or other printed material.

‘turn to page twenty;’; ‘turn through the book’;

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Spinverb

To stream or issue in a thread or a small current or jet.

‘Blood spins from a vein.’;

Turnverb

Of a bowler, to make (the ball) move sideways off the pitch when it bounces.

Spinverb

To wait in a loop until some condition becomes true.

Turnverb

Of a ball, to move sideways off the pitch when it bounces.

Spinverb

To play (vinyl records, etc.) as a disc jockey.

Turnverb

To change condition or attitude.

Spinnoun

Rapid circular motion.

‘The car went into a spin.’; ‘The skaters demonstrated their spins.’; ‘He put some spin on the cue ball.’;

Turnverb

(copulative) To become begin to be.

‘The leaves turn brown in autumn.’; ‘When I asked him for the money, he turned nasty.’;

Spinnoun

(physics) A quantum angular momentum associated with subatomic particles, which also creates a magnetic moment.

Turnverb

To change the color of the leaves in the autumn.

‘The hillside behind our house isn't generally much to look at, but once all the trees turn it's gorgeous.’;

Spinnoun

A favourable comment or interpretation intended to bias opinion on an otherwise unpleasant situation.

‘Try to put a positive spin on the disappointing sales figures.’; ‘The politician was mocked in the press for his reliance on spin rather than facts.’;

Turnverb

To change fundamentally; to metamorphose.

‘Midas made everything turn to gold.’; ‘He turned into a monster every full moon.’;

Spinnoun

(sports) Rotation of the ball as it flies through the air; sideways movement of the ball as it bounces.

Turnverb

To reach a certain age.

‘Charlie turns six on September 29.’;

Spinnoun

A condition of flight where a stalled aircraft is simultaneously pitching, yawing and rolling in a spinning motion.

Turnverb

To hinge; to depend.

‘The decision turns on a single fact.’;

Spinnoun

A brief trip by vehicle, especially one made for pleasure.

‘I'm off out for a spin in my new sports car.’;

Turnverb

To rebel; to go against something formerly tolerated.

‘The prisoners turned on the warden.’;

Spinnoun

A bundle of spun material; a mass of strands and filaments.

Turnverb

To change personal condition.

Spinnoun

A single play of a record by a radio station.

Turnverb

To change one's course of action; to take a new approach.

Spinnoun

(dated) Unmarried woman, spinster.

Turnverb

To complete.

‘They say they can turn the parts in two days.’;

Spinverb

To draw out, and twist into threads, either by the hand or machinery; as, to spin wool, cotton, or flax; to spin goat's hair; to produce by drawing out and twisting a fibrous material.

‘All the yarn she [Penelope] spun in Ulysses' absence did but fill Ithaca full of moths.’;

Turnverb

(transitive) To make (money); turn a profit.

‘We turned a pretty penny with that little scheme.’;

Spinverb

To draw out tediously; to form by a slow process, or by degrees; to extend to a great length; - with out; as, to spin out large volumes on a subject.

‘Do you mean that story is tediously spun out?’;

Turnverb

Of a player, to go past an opposition player with the ball in one's control.

Spinverb

To protract; to spend by delays; as, to spin out the day in idleness.

‘By one delay after another they spin out their whole lives.’;

Turnverb

To undergo the process of turning on a lathe.

‘Ivory turns well.’;

Spinverb

To cause to turn round rapidly; to whirl; to twirl; as, to spin a top.

Turnverb

(obstetrics) To bring down the feet of a child in the womb, in order to facilitate delivery.

Spinverb

To form (a web, a cocoon, silk, or the like) from threads produced by the extrusion of a viscid, transparent liquid, which hardens on coming into contact with the air; - said of the spider, the silkworm, etc.

Turnverb

To invert a type of the same thickness, as a temporary substitute for any sort which is exhausted.

Spinverb

To shape, as malleable sheet metal, into a hollow form, by bending or buckling it by pressing against it with a smooth hand tool or roller while the metal revolves, as in a lathe.

Turnverb

(archaic) To translate.

‘to turn the Iliad’;

Spinverb

To practice spinning; to work at drawing and twisting threads; to make yarn or thread from fiber; as, the woman knows how to spin; a machine or jenny spins with great exactness.

‘They neither know to spin, nor care to toll.’;

Turnverb

To magically or divinely attack undead.

Spinverb

To move round rapidly; to whirl; to revolve, as a top or a spindle, about its axis.

‘Round about him spun the landscape,Sky and forest reeled together.’; ‘With a whirligig of jubilant mosquitoes spinning about each head.’;

Turnnoun

A change of direction or orientation.

‘Give the handle a turn, then pull it.’;

Spinverb

To stream or issue in a thread or a small current or jet; as, blood spinsfrom a vein.

Turnnoun

A movement of an object about its own axis in one direction that continues until the object returns to its initial orientation.

Spinverb

To move swifty; as, to spin along the road in a carriage, on a bicycle, etc.

Turnnoun

(geometry) A unit of plane angle measurement based on this movement.

Spinnoun

The act of spinning; as, the spin of a top; a spin a bicycle.

Turnnoun

A single loop of a coil.

Spinnoun

Velocity of rotation about some specified axis.

Turnnoun

A chance to use (something) shared in sequence with others.

‘They took turns playing with the new toy.’;

Spinnoun

an interpretation of an event which is favorable to the interpreter or to the person s/he supports. A person whose task is to provide such interpretations for public relations purposes is called a spin doctor.

Turnnoun

The time allotted to a person in a rota or schedule.

‘I cooked tonight, so it's your turn to do the dishes.’;

Spinnoun

a swift whirling motion (usually of a missile)

Turnnoun

One's chance to make a move in a game having two or more players.

Spinnoun

the act of rotating rapidly;

‘he gave the crank a spin’; ‘it broke off after much twisting’;

Turnnoun

A figure in music, often denoted ~, consisting of the note above the one indicated, the note itself, the note below the one indicated, and the note itself again.

Spinnoun

a short drive in a car;

‘he took the new car for a spin’;

Turnnoun

(also turnaround) The time required to complete a project.

‘They quote a three-day turn on parts like those.’;

Spinnoun

rapid descent of an aircraft in a steep spiral

Turnnoun

A fit or a period of giddiness.

‘I've had a funny turn.’;

Spinnoun

a distinctive interpretation (especially as used by politicians to sway public opinion);

‘the campaign put a favorable spin on the story’;

Turnnoun

A change in temperament or circumstance.

‘She took a turn for the worse.’;

Spinverb

revolve quickly and repeatedly around one's own axis;

‘The dervishes whirl around and around without getting dizzy’;

Turnnoun

(cricket) A sideways movement of the ball when it bounces (caused by rotation in flight).

Spinverb

stream in jets, of liquids;

‘The creek spun its course through the woods’;

Turnnoun

(poker) The fourth communal card in Texas hold 'em.

Spinverb

cause to spin;

‘spin a coin’;

Turnnoun

The flop (the first three community cards) in Texas hold 'em.

Spinverb

make up a story;

‘spin a yarn’;

Turnnoun

A deed done to another.

‘One good turn deserves another.’; ‘I felt that the man was of a vindictive nature, and would do me an evil turn if he found the opportunitynb....’;

Spinverb

form a web by making a thread;

‘spiders spin a fine web’;

Turnnoun

(rope) A pass behind or through an object.

Spinverb

work natural fibers into a thread;

‘spin silk’;

Turnnoun

Character; personality; nature.

Spinverb

twist and turn so as to give an intended interpretation;

‘The President's spokesmen had to spin the story to make it less embarrasing’;

Turnnoun

(soccer) An instance of going past an opposition player with the ball in one's control.

Spinverb

prolong or extend;

‘spin out a visit’;

Turnnoun

A short skit, act, or routine.

Turnverb

To cause to move upon a center, or as if upon a center; to give circular motion to; to cause to revolve; to cause to move round, either partially, wholly, or repeatedly; to make to change position so as to present other sides in given directions; to make to face otherwise; as, to turn a wheel or a spindle; to turn the body or the head.

‘Turn the adamantine spindle round.’; ‘The monarch turns him to his royal guest.’;

Turnverb

To cause to present a different side uppermost or outmost; to make the upper side the lower, or the inside to be the outside of; to reverse the position of; as, to turn a box or a board; to turn a coat.

Turnverb

To give another direction, tendency, or inclination to; to direct otherwise; to deflect; to incline differently; - used both literally and figuratively; as, to turn the eyes to the heavens; to turn a horse from the road, or a ship from her course; to turn the attention to or from something.

‘Thrice I deluded her, and turned to sportHer importunity.’; ‘My thoughts are turned on peace.’;

Turnverb

To change from a given use or office; to divert, as to another purpose or end; to transfer; to use or employ; to apply; to devote.

‘Therefore he slew him, and turned the kingdom unto David.’; ‘God will make these evils the occasion of a greater good, by turning them to advantage in this world.’; ‘When the passage is open, land will be turned most to cattle; when shut, to sheep.’;

Turnverb

To change the form, quality, aspect, or effect of; to alter; to metamorphose; to convert; to transform; - often with to or into before the word denoting the effect or product of the change; as, to turn a worm into a winged insect; to turn green to blue; to turn prose into verse; to turn a Whig to a Tory, or a Hindu to a Christian; to turn good to evil, and the like.

‘The Lord thy God will turn thy captivity, and have compassion upon thee.’; ‘And David said, O Lord, I pray thee, turn the counsel of Ahithophel into foolishness.’; ‘Impatience turns an ague into a fever.’;

Turnverb

To form in a lathe; to shape or fashion (anything) by applying a cutting tool to it while revolving; as, to turn the legs of stools or tables; to turn ivory or metal.

‘I had rather hear a brazen canstick turned.’;

Turnverb

Hence, to give form to; to shape; to mold; to put in proper condition; to adapt.

‘His limbs how turned, how broad his shoulders spread !’; ‘He was perfectly well turned for trade.’;

Turnverb

To translate; to construe; as, to turn the Iliad.

‘Who turns a Persian tale for half a crown.’;

Turnverb

To make acid or sour; to ferment; to curdle, etc.: as, to turn cider or wine; electricity turns milk quickly.

Turnverb

To make a turn about or around (something); to go or pass around by turning; as, to turn a corner.

‘The ranges are not high or steep, and one can turn a kopje instead of cutting or tunneling through it.’; ‘We turn not back the silks upon the merchants,When we have soiled them.’; ‘I'll turn you out of my kingdom.’; ‘This house is turned upside down since Robin Ostler died.’;

Turnverb

To sicken; to nauseate; as, an emetic turns one's stomach.

Turnverb

To move round; to have a circular motion; to revolve entirely, repeatedly, or partially; to change position, so as to face differently; to whirl or wheel round; as, a wheel turns on its axis; a spindle turns on a pivot; a man turns on his heel.

‘The gate . . . on golden hinges turning.’;

Turnverb

Hence, to revolve as if upon a point of support; to hinge; to depend; as, the decision turns on a single fact.

‘Conditions of peace certainly turn upon events of war.’;

Turnverb

To result or terminate; to come about; to eventuate; to issue.

‘If we repent seriously, submit contentedly, and serve him faithfully, afflictions shall turn to our advantage.’;

Turnverb

To be deflected; to take a different direction or tendency; to be directed otherwise; to be differently applied; to be transferred; as, to turn from the road.

‘Turn from thy fierce wrath.’; ‘Turn ye, turn ye from your evil ways.’; ‘The understanding turns inward on itself, and reflects on its own operations.’;

Turnverb

To be changed, altered, or transformed; to become transmuted; also, to become by a change or changes; to grow; as, wood turns to stone; water turns to ice; one color turns to another; to turn Muslim.

‘I hope you have no intent to turn husband.’; ‘Cygnets from gray turn white.’;

Turnverb

To undergo the process of turning on a lathe; as, ivory turns well.

Turnverb

To become acid; to sour; - said of milk, ale, etc.

Turnverb

To become giddy; - said of the head or brain.

‘I'll look no more;Lest my brain turn.’;

Turnverb

To invert a type of the same thickness, as temporary substitute for any sort which is exhausted.

Turnverb

To be nauseated; - said of the stomach.

Turnverb

To become inclined in the other direction; - said of scales.

Turnverb

To change from ebb to flow, or from flow to ebb; - said of the tide.

Turnverb

To bring down the feet of a child in the womb, in order to facilitate delivery.

Turnnoun

The act of turning; movement or motion about, or as if about, a center or axis; revolution; as, the turn of a wheel.

Turnnoun

Change of direction, course, or tendency; different order, position, or aspect of affairs; alteration; vicissitude; as, the turn of the tide.

‘At length his complaint took a favorable turn.’; ‘The turns and varieties of all passions.’; ‘Too well the turns of mortal chance I know.’;

Turnnoun

One of the successive portions of a course, or of a series of occurrences, reckoning from change to change; hence, a winding; a bend; a meander.

‘And all its [the river's] thousand turns disclose.Some fresher beauty varying round.’;

Turnnoun

A circuitous walk, or a walk to and fro, ending where it began; a short walk; a stroll.

‘Come, you and I must walk a turn together.’; ‘I will take a turn in your garden.’;

Turnnoun

Successive course; opportunity enjoyed by alternation with another or with others, or in due order; due chance; alternate or incidental occasion; appropriate time.

‘His turn will come to laugh at you again.’; ‘Every one has a fair turn to be as great as he pleases.’;

Turnnoun

Incidental or opportune deed or office; occasional act of kindness or malice; as, to do one an ill turn.

‘Had I not done a friendes turn to thee?’; ‘thanks are half lost when good turns are delayed.’;

Turnnoun

Convenience; occasion; purpose; exigence; as, this will not serve his turn.

‘I have enough to serve mine own turn.’;

Turnnoun

Form; cast; shape; manner; fashion; - used in a literal or figurative sense; hence, form of expression; mode of signifying; as, the turn of thought; a man of a sprightly turn in conversation.

‘The turn of both his expressions and thoughts is unharmonious.’; ‘The Roman poets, in their description of a beautiful man, often mention the turn of his neck and arms.’;

Turnnoun

A change of condition; especially, a sudden or recurring symptom of illness, as a nervous shock, or fainting spell; as, a bad turn.

Turnnoun

A fall off the ladder at the gallows; a hanging; - so called from the practice of causing the criminal to stand on a ladder which was turned over, so throwing him off, when the signal was given.

Turnnoun

A round of a rope or cord in order to secure it, as about a pin or a cleat.

Turnnoun

A pit sunk in some part of a drift.

Turnnoun

A court of record, held by the sheriff twice a year in every hundred within his county.

Turnnoun

Monthly courses; menses.

Turnnoun

An embellishment or grace (marked thus, ), commonly consisting of the principal note, or that on which the turn is made, with the note above, and the semitone below, the note above being sounded first, the principal note next, and the semitone below last, the three being performed quickly, as a triplet preceding the marked note. The turn may be inverted so as to begin with the lower note, in which case the sign is either placed on end thus , or drawn thus .

Turnnoun

a circular segment of a curve;

‘a bend in the road’; ‘a crook in the path’;

Turnnoun

the act of changing or reversing the direction of the course;

‘he took a turn to the right’;

Turnnoun

the activity of doing something in an agreed succession;

‘it is my turn’; ‘it is still my play’;

Turnnoun

an unforeseen development;

‘events suddenly took an awkward turn’;

Turnnoun

a movement in a new direction;

‘the turning of the wind’;

Turnnoun

turning away or in the opposite direction;

‘he made an abrupt turn away from her’;

Turnnoun

turning or twisting around (in place);

‘with a quick twist of his head he surveyed the room’;

Turnnoun

a time for working (after which you will be relieved by someone else);

‘it's my go’; ‘a spell of work’;

Turnnoun

(sports) a period of play during which one team is on the offensive

Turnnoun

a short theatrical performance that is part of a longer program;

‘he did his act three times every evening’; ‘she had a catchy little routine’; ‘it was one of the best numbers he ever did’;

Turnnoun

a favor for someone;

‘he did me a good turn’;

Turnnoun

taking a short walk out and back;

‘we took a turn in the park’;

Turnverb

change orientation or direction, also in the abstract sense;

‘Turn towards me’; ‘The mugger turned and fled before I could see his face’; ‘She turned from herself and learned to listen to others' needs’;

Turnverb

undergo a change or development;

‘The water turned into ice’; ‘Her former friend became her worst enemy’; ‘He turned traitor’;

Turnverb

undergo a transformation or a change of position or action;

‘We turned from Socialism to Capitalism’; ‘The people turned against the President when he stole the election’;

Turnverb

cause to move around or rotate;

‘turn a key’; ‘turn your palm this way’;

Turnverb

pass into a condition gradually, take on a specific property or attribute; become;

‘The weather turned nasty’; ‘She grew angry’;

Turnverb

to send or let go;

‘They turned away the crowd at the gate of the governor's mansion’;

Turnverb

pass to the other side of;

‘turn the corner’; ‘move around the obstacle’;

Turnverb

move around an axis or a center;

‘The wheels are turning’;

Turnverb

cause to move around a center so as to show another side of;

‘turn a page of a book’;

Turnverb

change to the contrary;

‘The trend was reversed’; ‘the tides turned against him’; ‘public opinion turned when it was revealed that the president had an affair with a White House intern’;

Turnverb

to break and turn over earth especially with a plow;

‘Farmer Jones plowed his east field last week’; ‘turn the earth in the Spring’;

Turnverb

change color;

‘In Vermont, the leaves turn early’;

Turnverb

cause to change or turn into something different;assume new characteristics;

‘The princess turned the frog into a prince by kissing him’; ‘The alchemists tried to turn lead into gold’;

Turnverb

let (something) fall or spill a container;

‘turn the flour onto a plate’;

Turnverb

twist suddenly so as to sprain;

‘wrench one's ankle’; ‘The wrestler twisted his shoulder’; ‘the hikers sprained their ankles when they fell’; ‘I turned my ankle and couldn't walk for several days’;

Turnverb

shape by rotating on a lathe or cutting device or a wheel;

‘turn the legs of the table’; ‘turn the clay on the wheel’;

Turnverb

go sour or spoil;

‘The milk has soured’; ‘The wine worked’; ‘The cream has turned--we have to throw it out’;

Turnverb

accomplish by rotating;

‘turn a somersault’; ‘turn cartwheels’;

Turnverb

get by buying and selling;

‘the company turned a good profit after a year’;

Turnverb

cause to move along an axis or into a new direction;

‘turn your face to the wall’; ‘turn the car around’; ‘turn your dance partner around’;

Turnverb

channel one's attention, interest, thought, or attention toward or away from something;

‘The pedophile turned to boys for satisfaction’; ‘people turn to mysticism at the turn of a millenium’;

Turnverb

cause (a plastic object) to assume a crooked or angular form;

‘bend the rod’; ‘twist the dough into a braid’; ‘the strong man could turn an iron bar’;

Turnverb

alter the functioning or setting of;

‘turn the dial to 10’; ‘turn the heat down’;

Turnverb

direct at someone;

‘She turned a smile on me’; ‘They turned their flashlights on the car’;

Turnverb

have recourse to or make an appeal or request for help or information to;

‘She called on her Representative to help her’; ‘She turned to her relatives for help’;

Turnverb

become officially one year older;

‘She is turning 50 this year’;

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