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Gerund vs. Participle

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Gerundnoun

(grammar) A verbal form that functions as a verbal noun. (In English, a gerund has the same spelling as a present participle, but functions differently; however, this distinction may be ambiguous or unclear and so is no longer made in some modern texts such as A Comprehensive Grammar of the English Language and The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language)

Participlenoun

(grammar) A form of a verb that may function as an adjective or noun. English has two types of participles: the present participle and the past participle. In other languages, there are others, such as future, perfect, and future perfect participles.

Gerundnoun

(grammar) In some languages such as Dutch, Italian or Russian, a verbal form similar to a present participle, but functioning as an adverb to form adverbial phrases or continuous tense. These constructions have various names besides gerund, depending on the language, such as conjunctive participles, active participles, adverbial participles, transgressives, etc.

Participlenoun

A part of speech partaking of the nature of both verb and adjective; a form of a verb, or verbal adjective, modifying a noun, but taking the adjuncts of the verb from which it is derived. In the sentences: a letter is written; being asleep he did not hear; exhausted by toil he will sleep soundly, - written, being, and exhaustedare participles.

‘By a participle, [I understand] a verb in an adjectival aspect.’;

Gerundnoun

A kind of verbal noun, having only the four oblique cases of the singular number, and governing cases like a participle.

Participlenoun

Anything that partakes of the nature of different things.

‘The participles or confines between plants and living creatures.’;

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Gerundnoun

A verbal noun ending in -e, preceded by to and usually denoting purpose or end; - called also the dative infinitive; as, "Ic hæbbe mete tô etanne" (I have meat to eat.) In Modern English the name has been applied to verbal or participal nouns in -ing denoting a transitive action; e. g., by throwing a stone.

Participlenoun

a non-finite form of the verb; in English it is used adjectivally and to form compound tenses

Gerundnoun

a noun formed from a verb (such as the `-ing' form of an English verb when used as a noun)

Participle

In linguistics, a participle (PTCP) is a nonfinite verb form that has some of the characteristics and functions of both verbs and adjectives. More narrowly, participle has been defined as .“Participle” is a traditional grammatical term from Greek and Latin that is widely used for corresponding verb forms in European languages and analagous forms in Sanskrit and Arabic grammar.

‘a word derived from a verb and used as an adjective, as in a laughing face’;

Gerund

A gerund ( abbreviated GER) is any of various nonfinite verb forms in various languages; most often, but not exclusively, one that functions as a noun. In English, it has the properties of both verb and noun, such as being modifiable by an adverb and being able to take a direct object.

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