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Skim vs. Skit

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  • Skim (verb)

    To pass lightly; to glide along in an even, smooth course; to glide along near the surface.

  • Skim (verb)

    To pass near the surface of; to brush the surface of; to glide swiftly along the surface of.

  • Skim (verb)

    To hasten along with superficial attention.

  • Skim (verb)

    To put on a finishing coat of plaster.

  • Skim (verb)

    to throw an object so it bounces on water (skimming stones)

  • Skim (verb)

    to ricochet

  • Skim (verb)

    to read quickly, skipping some detail

    "I skimmed the newspaper over breakfast."

  • Skim (verb)

    to scrape off; to remove (something) from a surface

  • Skim (verb)

    to clear (a liquid) from scum or substance floating or lying on it, by means of a utensil that passes just beneath the surface.

    "to skim milk; to skim broth"

  • Skim (verb)

    to clear a liquid from (scum or substance floating or lying on it), especially the cream that floats on top of fresh milk

    "to skim cream"

  • Skim (verb)

    To steal money from a business before the transaction has been recorded, thus avoiding detection.

  • Skim (verb)

    To surreptitiously scan a payment card in order to obtain its information for fraudulent purposes.

  • Skim (verb)

    To become coated over.

  • Skim (adjective)

    Having lowered fat content.

  • Skim (noun)

    A cursory reading, skipping the details.

  • Skim (noun)

    Skim milk.

  • Skim (noun)

    The act of skimming.

  • Skim (noun)

    That which is skimmed off.

  • Skim (noun)

    Theft of money from a business before the transaction has been recorded, thus avoiding detection.

  • Skit (noun)

    A short comic performance.

  • Skit (noun)

    A jeer or sally; a brief satire.

  • Skit (noun)

    A wanton girl; a wench.

  • Skit (verb)

    To make fun of.

Wiktionary
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  • Skim

    To clear (a liquid) from scum or substance floating or lying thereon, by means of a utensil that passes just beneath the surface; as, to skim milk; to skim broth.

  • Skim

    To take off by skimming; as, to skim cream.

  • Skim

    To pass near the surface of; to brush the surface of; to glide swiftly along the surface of.

  • Skim

    Fig.: To read or examine superficially and rapidly, in order to cull the principal facts or thoughts; as, to skim a book or a newspaper.

  • Skim (verb)

    To pass lightly; to glide along in an even, smooth course; to glide along near the surface.

  • Skim (verb)

    To hasten along with superficial attention.

  • Skim (verb)

    To put on the finishing coat of plaster.

  • Skim (adjective)

    Contraction of Skimming and Skimmed.

  • Skit

    To cast reflections on; to asperse.

  • Skit (noun)

    A reflection; a jeer or gibe; a sally; a brief satire; a squib.

  • Skit (noun)

    A wanton girl; a light wench.

  • Skit (noun)

    A short theatrical presentation, often comical or satirical. Comical skits are sometimes presented by amateur or ad hoc groups at parties, dinners, or other social gatherings.

Webster Dictionary
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  • Skim (noun)

    a thin layer covering the surface of a liquid;

    "there was a thin skim of oil on the water"

  • Skim (noun)

    reading or glancing through quickly

  • Skim (verb)

    travel on the surface of water

  • Skim (verb)

    move or pass swiftly and lightly over the surface of

  • Skim (verb)

    examine hastily;

    "She scanned the newspaper headlines while waiting for the taxi"

  • Skim (verb)

    cause to skip over a surface;

    "Skip a stone across the pond"

  • Skim (verb)

    coat (a liquid) with a layer

  • Skim (verb)

    remove from the surface;

    "skim cream from the surface of milk"

  • Skim (verb)

    read superficially

  • Skim (adjective)

    used of milk and milk products from which the cream has been removed;

    "yogurt made with skim milk"

    "she can drink skimmed milk but should avoid butter"

  • Skit (noun)

    a short theatrical episode

Princeton's WordNet
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