VS.

Sail vs. Canvas

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Sailnoun

(nautical) A piece of fabric attached to a boat and arranged such that it causes the wind to drive the boat along. The sail may be attached to the boat via a combination of mast, spars and ropes.

Canvasnoun

A type of coarse cloth, woven from hemp, useful for making sails and tents or as a surface for paintings.

Sailnoun

(nautical,uncountable) The concept of a sail or sails, as if a substance.

‘Take in sail, a storm is coming.’;

Canvasnoun

A piece of canvas cloth stretched across a frame on which one may paint.

Sailnoun

(uncountable) The power harnessed by a sail or sails, or the use this power for travel or transport.

Canvasnoun

A basis for creative work.

‘The author takes rural midwestern life as a canvas for a series of tightly woven character studies.’;

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Sailnoun

A trip in a boat, especially a sailboat.

‘Let's go for a sail.’;

Canvasnoun

(computer graphics) A region on which graphics can be rendered.

Sailnoun

(dated) A sailing vessel; a vessel of any kind; a craft. Plural sail.

‘Twenty sail were in sight.’;

Canvasnoun

(nautical) Sails in general.

Sailnoun

The blade of a windmill.

Canvasnoun

A tent.

‘He spent the night under canvas.’;

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Sailnoun

A tower-like structure found on the dorsal (topside) surface of submarines.

Canvasnoun

A painting, or a picture on canvas.

Sailnoun

The floating organ of siphonophores, such as the Portuguese man-of-war.

Canvasnoun

A rough draft or model of a song, air, or other literary or musical composition; especially one to show a poet the measure of the verses he is to make.

Sailnoun

(fishing) A sailfish.

‘We caught three sails today.’;

Canvasnoun

alternative spelling of canvass.

Sailnoun

(paleontology) an outward projection of the spine, occurring in certain dinosaurs and synapsids

Canvasverb

To cover an area or object with canvas.

Sailnoun

Anything resembling a sail, such as a wing.

Canvasverb

alternative spelling of canvass.

Sailverb

To be impelled or driven forward by the action of wind upon sails, as a ship on water; to be impelled on a body of water by steam or other power.

Canvasnoun

A strong cloth made of hemp, flax, or cotton; - used for tents, sails, etc.

‘By glimmering lanes and walls of canvas led.’;

Sailverb

To move through or on the water; to swim, as a fish or a waterfowl.

Canvasnoun

A coarse cloth so woven as to form regular meshes for working with the needle, as in tapestry, or worsted work.

‘History . . . does not bring out clearly upon the canvas the details which were familiar.’;

Sailverb

To ride in a boat, especially a sailboat.

Canvasnoun

Something for which canvas is used: (a) A sail, or a collection of sails. (b) A tent, or a collection of tents. (c) A painting, or a picture on canvas.

‘To suit his canvas to the roughness of the see.’; ‘Light, rich as that which glows on the canvas of Claude.’;

Sailverb

To set sail; to begin a voyage.

‘We sail for Australia tomorrow.’;

Canvasnoun

A rough draft or model of a song, air, or other literary or musical composition; esp. one to show a poet the measure of the verses he is to make.

Sailverb

To move briskly and gracefully through the air.

Canvasadjective

Made of, pertaining to, or resembling, canvas or coarse cloth; as, a canvas tent.

Sailverb

To move briskly.

‘The duchess sailed haughtily out of the room.’;

Canvasnoun

heavy closely woven fabric (used for clothing or chairs or sails or tents)

Sailnoun

An extent of canvas or other fabric by means of which the wind is made serviceable as a power for propelling vessels through the water.

‘Behoves him now both sail and oar.’;

Canvasnoun

an oil painting on canvas

Sailnoun

Anything resembling a sail, or regarded as a sail.

Canvasnoun

the setting for a narrative or fictional or dramatic account;

‘the crowded canvas of history’; ‘the movie demanded a dramatic canvas of sound’;

Sailnoun

A wing; a van.

‘Like an eagle soaringTo weather his broad sails.’;

Canvasnoun

a tent made of canvas

Sailnoun

The extended surface of the arm of a windmill.

Canvasnoun

a large piece of fabric (as canvas) by means of which wind is used to propel a sailing vessel

Sailnoun

A sailing vessel; a vessel of any kind; a craft.

Canvasnoun

the mat that forms the floor of the ring in which boxers or professional wrestlers compete;

‘the boxer picked himself up off the canvas’;

Sailnoun

A passage by a sailing vessel; a journey or excursion upon the water.

Canvasverb

solicit votes from potential voters in an electoral campaign

Sailverb

To be impelled or driven forward by the action of wind upon sails, as a ship on water; to be impelled on a body of water by the action of steam or other power.

Canvasverb

get the opinions (of people) by asking specific questions

Sailverb

To move through or on the water; to swim, as a fish or a water fowl.

Canvasverb

cover with canvas;

‘She canvassed the walls of her living room so as to conceal the ugly cracks’;

Sailverb

To be conveyed in a vessel on water; to pass by water; as, they sailed from London to Canton.

Canvasverb

consider in detail and subject to an analysis in order to discover essential features or meaning;

‘analyze a sonnet by Shakespeare’; ‘analyze the evidence in a criminal trial’; ‘analyze your real motives’;

Sailverb

To set sail; to begin a voyage.

Canvasnoun

a strong, coarse unbleached cloth made from hemp, flax, or a similar yarn, used to make items such as sails and tents and as a surface for oil painting

‘the painting is oil on canvas’; ‘a canvas bag’;

Sailverb

To move smoothly through the air; to glide through the air without apparent exertion, as a bird.

‘As is a winged messenger of heaven, . . .When he bestrides the lazy pacing clouds,And sails upon the bosom of the air.’;

Canvasnoun

a piece of canvas prepared for use as the surface for an oil painting

‘they found a canvas and he seated his model’; ‘he is used to painting large canvases’;

Sailverb

To pass or move upon, as in a ship, by means of sails; hence, to move or journey upon (the water) by means of steam or other force.

‘A thousand ships were manned to sail the sea.’;

Canvasnoun

an oil painting

‘Turner's late canvases’;

Sailverb

To fly through; to glide or move smoothly through.

‘Sublime she sailsThe aërial space, and mounts the wingèd gales.’;

Canvasnoun

a variety of canvas with an open weave, used as a basis for tapestry and embroidery

‘she sent her needle stabbing in and out of the canvas’;

Sailverb

To direct or manage the motion of, as a vessel; as, to sail one's own ship.

Canvasnoun

the canvas-covered floor of a boxing or wrestling ring

‘a thunderous uppercut sent him crashing to the canvas’;

Sailnoun

a large piece of fabric (as canvas) by means of which wind is used to propel a sailing vessel

Canvasnoun

either of a racing boat's tapering ends, originally covered with canvas.

Sailnoun

an ocean trip taken for pleasure

Canvasverb

cover with canvas

‘the door had been canvassed over’;

Sailverb

traverse or travel by ship on (a body of water);

‘We sailed the Atlantic’; ‘He sailed the Pacific all alone’;

Canvas

Canvas is an extremely durable plain-woven fabric used for making sails, tents, marquees, backpacks, shelters, as a support for oil painting and for other items for which sturdiness is required, as well as in such fashion objects as handbags, electronic device cases, and shoes. It is also popularly used by artists as a painting surface, typically stretched across a wooden frame.

Sailverb

move with sweeping, effortless, gliding motions;

‘The diva swept into the room’; ‘Shreds of paper sailed through the air’; ‘The searchlights swept across the sky’;

Sailverb

travel in a boat propelled by wind;

‘I love sailing, especially on the open sea’;

Sailverb

travel by boat on a boat propelled by wind or by other means;

‘The QE2 will sail to Southampton tomorrow’;

Sailnoun

a piece of material extended on a mast to catch the wind and propel a boat or ship or other vessel

‘all the sails were unfurled’; ‘the boat can no longer carry that area of sail’;

Sailnoun

the use of sailing ships as a means of transport

‘this led to bigger ships as steam replaced sail’;

Sailnoun

a sailing ship

‘sail ahoy!’;

Sailnoun

a wind-catching apparatus attached to the arm of a windmill.

Sailnoun

the broad fin on the back of a sailfish or of some prehistoric reptiles.

Sailnoun

a structure by which an animal is propelled across the surface of water by the wind, e.g. the float of a Portuguese man-of-war.

Sailnoun

a voyage or excursion in a ship, especially a sailing ship or boat

‘they went for a sail’;

Sailnoun

the conning tower of a submarine.

Sailnoun

a canvas sheet or tarpaulin

‘the sail covering the load of crates broke loose from the truck’;

Sailverb

travel in a boat with sails, especially as a sport or recreation

‘Ian took us out sailing on the lake’;

Sailverb

travel in a ship or boat using sails or engine power

‘the ferry caught fire sailing between Caen and Portsmouth’;

Sailverb

begin a voyage; leave a harbour

‘the catamaran sails at 3:30’;

Sailverb

travel by ship on or across (a sea) or on (a route)

‘plastic ships could be sailing the oceans soon’;

Sailverb

navigate or control (a boat or ship)

‘I stole a small fishing boat and sailed it to the Delta’;

Sailverb

move smoothly and rapidly or in a stately or confident manner

‘the ball sailed inside the right-hand post’;

Sailverb

succeed easily at (something, especially a test or examination)

‘Ali sailed through his exams’;

Sailverb

attack physically or verbally with force.

Sail

A sail is a tensile structure—made from fabric or other membrane materials—that uses wind power to propel sailing craft, including sailing ships, sailboats, windsurfers, ice boats, and even sail-powered land vehicles. Sails may be made from a combination of woven materials—including canvas or polyester cloth, laminated membranes or bonded filaments—usually in a three- or four-sided shape.

Sail Illustrations

Canvas Illustrations

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