VS.

Revolve vs. Orbit

Published:

Revolveverb

(intransitive) To orbit a central point.

‘The Earth revolves around the sun.’;

Orbitnoun

A circular or elliptical path of one object around another object, particularly in astronomy and space travel.

‘The Moon's orbit around the Earth takes nearly one month to complete.’;

Revolveverb

(intransitive) To turn on an axis.

‘The Earth revolves once every twenty-four hours.’;

Orbitnoun

A sphere of influence; an area of control.

‘In the post WWII era, several eastern European countries came into the orbit of the Soviet Union.’;

Revolveverb

(transitive) To cause to turn.

Orbitnoun

The course of one's usual progression, or the extent of one's typical range.

‘The convenience store was a heavily travelled point in her daily orbit, as she purchased both cigarettes and lottery tickets there.’;

ADVERTISEMENT

Revolveverb

(intransitive) To recur in cycles.

‘The program revolves through all the queues before returning to the start.’; ‘The centuries revolve.’;

Orbitnoun

(anatomy) The bony cavity containing the eyeball; the eye socket.

Revolveverb

(transitive) To ponder on; to reflect repeatedly upon; to consider all aspects of.

Orbitnoun

(physics) A mathematical function that describes the wave-like behavior of an electron in an atom; area of the highest probability of electron´s occurrence around the atom's nucleus.

Revolvenoun

The rotation of part of the scenery within a theatrical production.

Orbitnoun

(mathematics) A collection of points related by the evolution function of a dynamical system.

ADVERTISEMENT

Revolvenoun

(obsolete) A radical change; revolution.

Orbitnoun

The subset of elements of a set X to which a given element can be moved by members of a specified group of transformations that act on X.

Revolveverb

To turn or roll round on, or as on, an axis, like a wheel; to rotate, - which is the more specific word in this sense.

‘If the earth revolve thus, each house near the equator must move a thousand miles an hour.’;

Orbitnoun

(informal) A state of increased excitement, activity, or anger.

‘Dad went into orbit when I told him that I'd crashed the car.’;

Revolveverb

To move in a curved path round a center; as, the planets revolve round the sun.

Orbitverb

To circle or revolve around another object.

‘The Earth orbits the Sun.’;

ADVERTISEMENT

Revolveverb

To pass in cycles; as, the centuries revolve.

Orbitverb

To move around the general vicinity of something.

‘The harried mother had a cloud of children orbiting her, asking for sweets.’;

Revolveverb

To return; to pass.

Orbitverb

To place an object into an orbit around a planet.

‘A rocket was used to orbit the satellite.’;

Revolveverb

To cause to turn, as on an axis.

‘Then in the east her turn she shines,Revolved on heaven's great axile.’;

Orbitnoun

The path described by a heavenly body in its periodical revolution around another body; as, the orbit of Jupiter, of the earth, of the moon.

Revolveverb

Hence, to turn over and over in the mind; to reflect repeatedly upon; to consider all aspects of.

‘This having heard, straight I again revolvedThe law and prophets.’;

Orbitnoun

An orb or ball.

‘Roll the lucid orbit of an eye.’;

Revolveverb

turn on or around an axis or a center;

‘The Earth revolves around the Sun’; ‘The lamb roast rotates on a spit over the fire’;

Orbitnoun

The cavity or socket of the skull in which the eye and its appendages are situated.

Revolveverb

move in an orbit;

‘The moon orbits around the Earth’; ‘The planets are orbiting the sun’; ‘electrons orbit the nucleus’;

Orbitnoun

The skin which surrounds the eye of a bird.

Revolveverb

cause to move by turning over or in a circular manner of as if on an axis;

‘She rolled the ball’; ‘They rolled their eyes at his words’;

Orbitnoun

the (usually elliptical) path described by one celestial body in its revolution about another;

‘he plotted the orbit of the moon’;

Orbitnoun

a particular environment or walk of life;

‘his social sphere is limited’; ‘it was a closed area of employment’; ‘he's out of my orbit’;

Orbitnoun

an area in which something acts or operates or has power or control:

‘the range of a supersonic jet’; ‘the ambit of municipal legislation’; ‘within the compass of this article’; ‘within the scope of an investigation’; ‘outside the reach of the law’; ‘in the political orbit of a world power’;

Orbitnoun

the path of an electron around the nucleus of an atom

Orbitnoun

the bony cavity in the skull containing the eyeball

Orbitverb

move in an orbit;

‘The moon orbits around the Earth’; ‘The planets are orbiting the sun’; ‘electrons orbit the nucleus’;

Orbitnoun

the curved path of a celestial object or spacecraft round a star, planet, or moon, especially a periodic elliptical revolution

‘the Earth's orbit around the sun’;

Orbitnoun

one complete circuit round an orbited body

‘the satellite will complete one orbit every 12 hours’;

Orbitnoun

the state of moving in an orbit

‘the earth is in orbit around the sun’;

Orbitnoun

the path of an electron round an atomic nucleus.

Orbitnoun

an area of activity, interest, or influence

‘audiences drawn largely from outside the Party orbit’;

Orbitnoun

the cavity in the skull of a vertebrate that contains the eye; the eye socket.

Orbitnoun

the area round the eye of a bird or other animal.

Orbitverb

(of a celestial object or spacecraft) move in orbit round (a star or planet)

‘Mercury orbits the Sun’;

Orbitverb

move in a circle

‘the discs spun and orbited slowly’;

Orbitverb

put (a satellite) into orbit

‘France has been orbiting satellites with her own launcher’;

Orbit

In physics, an orbit is the gravitationally curved trajectory of an object, such as the trajectory of a planet around a star or a natural satellite around a planet. Normally, orbit refers to a regularly repeating trajectory, although it may also refer to a non-repeating trajectory.

Orbit Illustrations

Popular Comparisons

Latest Comparisons

Trending Comparisons