VS.

Pledge vs. Collateral

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Pledgeverb

To make a solemn promise (to do something).

Collateraladjective

Parallel, along the same vein, side by side.

Pledgeverb

To deposit something as a security; to pawn.

Collateraladjective

Corresponding; accompanying, concomitant.

Pledgeverb

(transitive) To give assurance of friendship by the act of drinking; to drink to one's health.

Collateraladjective

Being aside from the main subject, target, or goal; tangential, subordinate, ancillary.

‘Although not a direct cause, the border skirmish was certainly a collateral incitement for the war.’; ‘collateral damage’;

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Pledgenoun

A solemn promise to do something.

Collateraladjective

Of an indirect ancestral relationship, as opposed to lineal descendency.

‘Uncles, aunts, cousins, nephews and nieces are collateral relatives.’;

Pledgenoun

Something given by a person who is borrowing money etc to the person he has borrowed it from, to be kept until the money etc is returned.

Collateraladjective

Relating to a collateral in the sense of an obligation or security.

Pledgenoun

A person who has taken a pledge of allegiance to a college fraternity, but is not yet formally approved.

Collateraladjective

Expensive to the extent of being paid through a loan.

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Pledgenoun

A security to guarantee payment of a debt.

Collateraladjective

Coming or directed along the side.

‘collateral pressure’;

Pledgenoun

A drinking toast.

Collateraladjective

Acting in an indirect way.

Pledgenoun

}} A promise to abstain from drinking alcohol.

Collateralnoun

A security or guarantee (usually an asset) pledged for the repayment of a loan if one cannot procure enough funds to repay. (Originally supplied as "accompanying" security.)

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Pledgenoun

The transfer of possession of personal property from a debtor to a creditor as security for a debt or engagement; also, the contract created between the debtor and creditor by a thing being so delivered or deposited, forming a species of bailment; also, that which is so delivered or deposited; something put in pawn.

Collateralnoun

A collateral (not linear) family member.

Pledgenoun

A person who undertook, or became responsible, for another; a bail; a surety; a hostage.

Collateralnoun

A branch of a bodily part or system of organs.

‘Besides the arteries blood streams through numerous veins we call collaterals’;

Pledgenoun

A hypothecation without transfer of possession.

Collateralnoun

(marketing) Printed materials or content of electronic media used to enhance sales of products (short form of collateral material).

Pledgenoun

Anything given or considered as a security for the performance of an act; a guarantee; as, mutual interest is the best pledge for the performance of treaties.

Collateralnoun

A thinner blood vessel providing an alternate route to blood flow in case the main vessel becomes occluded.

Pledgenoun

A promise or agreement by which one binds one's self to do, or to refrain from doing, something; especially, a solemn promise in writing to refrain from using intoxicating liquors or the like; as, to sign the pledge; the mayor had made no pledges.

Collateralnoun

(archaic) A contemporary or rival.

Pledgenoun

A sentiment to which assent is given by drinking one's health; a toast; a health.

Collateraladjective

Coming from, being on, or directed toward, the side; as, collateral pressure.

Pledgeverb

To deposit, as a chattel, in pledge or pawn; to leave in possession of another as security; as, to pledge one's watch.

Collateraladjective

Acting in an indirect way.

‘If by direct or by collateral handThey find us touched, we will our kingdom give . . . To you in satisfaction.’;

Pledgeverb

To give or pass as a security; to guarantee; to engage; to plight; as, to pledge one's word and honor.

‘We mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor.’;

Collateraladjective

Related to, but not strictly a part of, the main thing or matter under consideration; hence, subordinate; not chief or principal; as, collateral interest; collateral issues.

‘That he [Attebury] was altogether in the wrong on the main question, and on all the collateral questions springing out of it, . . . is true.’;

Pledgeverb

To secure performance of, as by a pledge.

‘To pledge my vow, I give my hand.’;

Collateraladjective

Tending toward the same conclusion or result as something else; additional; as, collateral evidence.

‘Yet the attempt may giveCollateral interest to this homely tale.’;

Pledgeverb

To bind or engage by promise or declaration; to engage solemnly; as, to pledge one's self.

Collateraladjective

Descending from the same stock or ancestor, but not in the same line or branch or one from the other; - opposed to lineal.

Pledgeverb

To invite another to drink, by drinking of the cup first, and then handing it to him, as a pledge of good will; hence, to drink the health of; to toast.

‘Pledge me, my friend, and drink till thou be'st wise.’;

Collateralnoun

A collateral relative.

Pledgenoun

a deposit of personal property as security for a debt;

‘his saxophone was in pledge’;

Collateralnoun

Collateral security; that which is pledged or deposited as collateral security.

Pledgenoun

someone accepted for membership but not yet fully admitted to the group

Collateralnoun

a security pledged for the repayment of a loan

Pledgenoun

a drink in honor of or to the health of a person or event

Collateraladjective

descended from a common ancestor but through different lines;

‘cousins are collateral relatives’; ‘an indirect descendant of the Stuarts’;

Pledgenoun

a binding commitment to do or give or refrain from something;

‘an assurance of help when needed’; ‘signed a pledge never to reveal the secret’;

Collateraladjective

serving to support or corroborate;

‘collateral evidence’;

Pledgeverb

promise solemnly and formally;

‘I pledge that will honor my wife’;

Collateraladjective

accompaniment to something else;

‘collateral target damage from a bombing run’;

Pledgeverb

pay (an amount of money) as a contribution to a charity or service, especially at regular intervals;

‘I pledged $10 a month to my favorite radio station’;

Collateraladjective

situated or running side by side;

‘collateral ridges of mountains’;

Pledgeverb

propose a toast to;

‘Let us toast the birthday girl!’; ‘Let's drink to the New Year’;

Collateralnoun

something pledged as security for repayment of a loan, to be forfeited in the event of a default

‘she put her house up as collateral for the bank loan’;

Pledgeverb

give as a guarantee;

‘I pledge my honor’;

Collateralnoun

a person having the same ancestor as another but through a different line.

Pledgeverb

bind or secure by a pledge;

‘I was pledged to silence’;

Collateraladjective

additional but subordinate; secondary

‘the collateral meanings of a word’;

Pledgenoun

a solemn promise or undertaking

‘the conference ended with a joint pledge to limit pollution’;

Collateraladjective

denoting inadvertent casualties and destruction in civilian areas in the course of military operations

‘collateral casualties’; ‘munitions must be able to destroy the target without causing collateral damage’;

Pledgenoun

a promise of a donation to charity

‘appeals for emergency relief met with pledges totalling £250,000,000’;

Collateraladjective

descended from the same stock but by a different line

‘a collateral descendant of Robert Burns’;

Pledgenoun

a solemn undertaking to abstain from alcohol

‘she persuaded Arthur to take the pledge’;

Collateraladjective

situated side by side; parallel

‘collateral veins’;

Pledgenoun

a thing that is given as security for the fulfilment of a contract or the payment of a debt and is liable to forfeiture in the event of failure

‘he had given the object as a pledge to a creditor’;

Pledgenoun

a thing given as a token of love, favour, or loyalty

‘I have no intention of giving you anything that could be held against me as a pledge’;

Pledgenoun

the drinking of a person's health; a toast.

Pledgeverb

commit (a person or organization) by a solemn promise

‘the government pledged itself to deal with environmental problems’;

Pledgeverb

formally declare or promise that something is or will be the case

‘the Prime Minister pledged that there would be no increase in VAT’;

Pledgeverb

solemnly undertake to do something

‘they pledged to continue the campaign for funding’;

Pledgeverb

undertake formally to give

‘Japan pledged $100 million in humanitarian aid’;

Pledgeverb

give as security on a loan

‘the creditor to whom the land is pledged’;

Pledgeverb

drink to the health of

‘in his hand a sculptured goblet, as he pledged the merchant kings’;

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