VS.

Pole vs. Rod

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  • Pole (noun)

    Originally, a stick; now specifically, a long and slender piece of metal or (especially) wood, used for various construction or support purposes.

  • Pole (noun)

    A type of basic fishing rod.

  • Pole (noun)

    A long sports implement used for pole-vaulting; now made of glassfiber or carbon fiber, formerly also metal, bamboo and wood have been used.

  • Pole (noun)

    A telescope used to identify birds, aeroplanes or wildlife.

  • Pole (noun)

    A unit of length, equal to a perch (¼ chain or 5½ yards).

  • Pole (noun)

    Pole position.

  • Pole (noun)

    A gun.

  • Pole (noun)

    Either of the two points on the earth's surface around which it rotates; also, similar points on any other rotating object.

  • Pole (noun)

    A point of magnetic focus, especially each of the two opposing such points of a magnet (designated north and south).

  • Pole (noun)

    A fixed point relative to other points or lines.

  • Pole (noun)

    A contact on an electrical device (such as a battery) at which electric current enters or leaves.

  • Pole (noun)

    For a meromorphic function f(z), any point a for which f(z) \rightarrow \infty as z \rightarrow a.

    "ux|en|The function f(z) = \frac{1}{z-3} has a single pole at z = 3."

  • Pole (noun)

    The firmament; the sky.

  • Pole (noun)

    Either of the states that characterize a bipolar disorder.

  • Pole (verb)

    To propel by pushing with poles, to push with a pole.

    "Huck Finn poled that raft southward down the Mississippi because going northward against the current was too much work."

  • Pole (verb)

    To identify something quite precisely using a telescope.

    "He poled off the serial of the Gulfstream to confirm its identity."

  • Pole (verb)

    To furnish with poles for support.

    "to pole beans or hops"

  • Pole (verb)

    To convey on poles.

    "to pole hay into a barn"

  • Pole (verb)

    To stir, as molten glass, with a pole.

  • Pole (verb)

    To induce piezoelectricity in (a substance) by aligning the dipoles.

  • Rod (noun)

    A straight, round stick, shaft, bar, cane, or staff.

    "The circus strong man proved his strength by bending an iron rod, and then straightening it."

  • Rod (noun)

    A longitudinal pole used for forming part of a framework such as an awning or tent.

  • Rod (noun)

    A long slender usually tapering pole used for angling; fishing rod.

    "When I hooked a snake and not a fish, I got so scared I dropped my rod in the water."

  • Rod (noun)

    A stick, pole, or bundle of switches or twigs (such as a birch), used for personal defense or to administer corporal punishment by whipping.

  • Rod (noun)

    An implement resembling and/or supplanting a rod (particularly a cane) that is used for corporal punishment, and metonymically called the rod, regardless of its actual shape and composition.

    "The judge imposed on the thief a sentence of fifteen strokes with the rod."

  • Rod (noun)

    A stick used to measure distance, by using its established length or task-specific temporary marks along its length, or by dint of specific graduated marks.

    "I notched a rod and used it to measure the length of rope to cut."

  • Rod (noun)

    A feet, or exactly 5.0292 meters (these being all equivalent).

  • Rod (noun)

    An implement held vertically and viewed through an optical surveying instrument such as a transit, used to measure distance in land surveying and construction layout; an engineer's rod, surveyor's rod, surveying rod, leveling rod, ranging rod. The modern engineer's or surveyor's rod commonly is eight or ten feet long and often designed to extend higher. In former times a surveyor's rod often was a single wooden pole or composed of multiple sectioned and socketed pieces, and besides serving as a sighting target was used to measure distance on the ground horizontally, hence for convenience was of one rod or pole in length, that is, 5½ yards.

  • Rod (noun)

    A unit of area equal to a square rod, 30¼ square yards or 1/160 acre.

    "The house had a small yard of about six rods in size."

  • Rod (noun)

    A straight bar that unites moving parts of a machine, for holding parts together as a connecting rod or for transferring power as a drive-shaft.

    "The engine threw a rod, and then went to pieces before our eyes, springs and coils shooting in all directions."

  • Rod (noun)

    Short for rod cell, a rod-shaped cell in the eye that is sensitive to light.

    "The rods are more sensitive than the cones, but do not discern color."

  • Rod (noun)

    Any of a number of long, slender microorganisms.

    "He applied a gram positive stain, looking for rods indicative of Listeria."

  • Rod (noun)

    A stirring rod: a glass rod, typically about 6 inches to 1 foot long and 1/8 to 1/4 inch in diameter that can be used to stir liquids in flasks or beakers.

  • Rod (noun)

    A pistol; a gun.

  • Rod (noun)

    A penis.

  • Rod (noun)

    A hot rod, an automobile or other passenger motor vehicle modified to run faster and often with exterior cosmetic alterations, especially one based originally on a pre-1940s model or (currently) denoting any older vehicle thus modified.

  • Rod (noun)

    A rod-shaped object that appears in photographs or videos traveling at high speed, not seen by the person recording the event, often associated with extraterrestrial entities.

  • Rod (noun)

    A Cuisenaire rod.

  • Rod (noun)

    A coupling rod or connecting rod, which links the driving wheels of a steam locomotive.

  • Rod (verb)

    To reinforce concrete with metal rods.

  • Rod (verb)

    To penetrate sexually.

  • Rod (verb)

    To hot rod.

Wiktionary
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  • Pole (noun)

    A native or inhabitant of Poland; a Polander.

  • Pole (noun)

    A long, slender piece of wood; a tall, slender piece of timber; the stem of a small tree whose branches have been removed; as, specifically: (a) A carriage pole, a wooden bar extending from the front axle of a carriage between the wheel horses, by which the carriage is guided and held back. (b) A flag pole, a pole on which a flag is supported. (c) A Maypole. See Maypole. (d) A barber's pole, a pole painted in stripes, used as a sign by barbers and hairdressers. (e) A pole on which climbing beans, hops, or other vines, are trained.

  • Pole (noun)

    A measuring stick; also, a measure of length equal to 5 yards, or a square measure equal to 30 square yards; a rod; a perch.

  • Pole (noun)

    Either extremity of an axis of a sphere; especially, one of the extremities of the earth's axis; as, the north pole.

  • Pole (noun)

    A point upon the surface of a sphere equally distant from every part of the circumference of a great circle; or the point in which a diameter of the sphere perpendicular to the plane of such circle meets the surface. Such a point is called the pole of that circle; as, the pole of the horizon; the pole of the ecliptic; the pole of a given meridian.

  • Pole (noun)

    One of the opposite or contrasted parts or directions in which a polar force is manifested; a point of maximum intensity of a force which has two such points, or which has polarity; as, the poles of a magnet; the north pole of a needle.

  • Pole (noun)

    The firmament; the sky.

  • Pole (noun)

    See Polarity, and Polar, n.

  • Pole

    To furnish with poles for support; as, to pole beans or hops.

  • Pole

    To convey on poles; as, to pole hay into a barn.

  • Pole

    To impel by a pole or poles, as a boat.

  • Pole

    To stir, as molten glass, with a pole.

  • Rod (noun)

    A straight and slender stick; a wand; hence, any slender bar, as of wood or metal (applied to various purposes).

  • Rod (noun)

    A kind of sceptor, or badge of office; hence, figuratively, power; authority; tyranny; oppression.

  • Rod (noun)

    A measure of length containing sixteen and a half feet; - called also perch, and pole.

Webster Dictionary
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  • Pole (noun)

    a long (usually round) rod of wood or metal or plastic

  • Pole (noun)

    a native or inhabitant of Poland

  • Pole (noun)

    one of two divergent or mutually exclusive opinions;

    "they are at opposite poles"

    "they are poles apart"

  • Pole (noun)

    a linear measure of 16.5 feet

  • Pole (noun)

    a square rod of land

  • Pole (noun)

    one of two points of intersection of the Earth's axis and the celestial sphere

  • Pole (noun)

    one of two antipodal points where the Earth's axis of rotation intersects the Earth's surface

  • Pole (noun)

    a contact on an electrical device (such as a battery) at which electric current enters or leaves

  • Pole (noun)

    a long fiberglass sports implement used for pole vaulting

  • Pole (noun)

    one of the two ends of a magnet where the magnetism seems to be concentrated

  • Pole (verb)

    propel with a pole;

    "pole barges on the river"

    "We went punting in Cambridge"

  • Pole (verb)

    support on poles;

    "pole climbing plants like beans"

  • Pole (verb)

    deoxidize molten metals by stirring them with a wooden pole

  • Rod (noun)

    a linear measure of 16.5 feet

  • Rod (noun)

    a long thin implement made of metal or wood

  • Rod (noun)

    any rod-shaped bacterium

  • Rod (noun)

    a square rod of land

  • Rod (noun)

    visual receptor cell sensitive to dim light

  • Rod (noun)

    a gangster's pistol

Princeton's WordNet
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