VS.

Draw vs. Drag

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  • Draw (verb)

    To move or develop something.

  • Draw (verb)

    To sketch; depict with lines; to produce a picture with pencil, crayon, chalk, etc. on paper, cardboard, etc.

  • Draw (verb)

    To deduce or infer.

    "He tried to draw a conclusion from the facts."

  • Draw (verb)

    (of drinks, especially tea) To leave temporarily so as to allow the flavour to increase.

    "Tea is much nicer if you let it draw for three minutes before pouring."

  • Draw (verb)

    To take or procure from a place of deposit; to call for and receive from a fund, etc.

    "to draw money from a bank"

  • Draw (verb)

    To take into the lungs; to inhale.

  • Draw (verb)

    To move; to come or go.

    "We drew back from the cliff edge."

    "The runners drew level with each other as they approached the finish line."

    "Draw near to the fire and I will tell you a tale."

  • Draw (verb)

    To obtain from some cause or origin; to infer from evidence or reasons; to deduce from premises; to derive.

  • Draw (verb)

    To withdraw.

  • Draw (verb)

    To exert or experience force.

  • Draw (verb)

    To draw up (a document).

    "to draw a memorial, a deed, or bill of exchange"

  • Draw (verb)

    To drag, pull.

  • Draw (verb)

    To pull; to exert strength in drawing anything; to have force to move anything by pulling.

    "This horse draws well."

    "A ship's sail is said to draw when it is filled with wind."

  • Draw (verb)

    To pull out (as a gun from a holster, or a tooth).

    "They drew their swords and fought each other."

  • Draw (verb)

    To undergo the action of pulling or dragging.

    "The carriage draws easily."

  • Draw (verb)

    To pull back the bowstring and its arrow in preparation for shooting.

  • Draw (verb)

    (of curtains, etc.) To close.

    "You should draw the curtains at night."

  • Draw (verb)

    (of curtains, etc.) To open.

    "She drew the curtains to let in the sunlight."

  • Draw (verb)

    To remove or separate or displace.

  • Draw (verb)

    To take the top card of a deck into hand.

    "At the start of their turn, each player must draw a card."

  • Draw (verb)

    To extract a liquid, or cause a liquid to come out, primarily water or blood.

    "draw water from a well;"

    "draw water for a bath;"

    "the wound drew blood"

  • Draw (verb)

    To drain by emptying; to suck dry.

  • Draw (verb)

    To extract; to force out; to elicit; to derive.

  • Draw (verb)

    To sink in water; to require a depth for floating.

    "A ship draws ten feet of water."

  • Draw (verb)

    To work as an epispastic; said of a blister, poultice, etc.

  • Draw (verb)

    To have a draught; to transmit smoke, gases, etc.

    "A chimney or flue draws."

  • Draw (verb)

    To change in size or shape.

  • Draw (verb)

    To consume, for example, power.

    "The circuit draws three hundred watts."

  • Draw (verb)

    To extend in length; to lengthen; to protract; to stretch.

    "to draw a mass of metal into wire"

  • Draw (verb)

    To attract or be attracted.

  • Draw (verb)

    To become contracted; to shrink.

  • Draw (verb)

    To attract.

    "The citizens were afraid the casino would draw an undesirable element to their town."

    "I was drawn to her."

  • Draw (verb)

    To induce a reticent person to speak.

    "He refused to be drawn on the subject"

  • Draw (verb)

    To search for game.

  • Draw (verb)

    To cause.

  • Draw (verb)

    (Usually as draw on or draw upon): to rely on; utilize as a source.

    "She had to draw upon her experience to solve the problem."

  • Draw (verb)

    To disembowel.

    "He will be hanged, drawn and quartered."

  • Draw (verb)

    To end a game in a draw (with neither side winning).

    "We drew last time we played."

    "I drew him last time I played him."

    "I drew my last game against him."

  • Draw (verb)

    A random selection process.

  • Draw (verb)

    To exert an attractive force; to act as an inducement or enticement.

  • Draw (verb)

    To select by the drawing of lots.

    "The winning lottery numbers were drawn every Tuesday."

  • Draw (verb)

    To win in a lottery or similar game of chance.

    "He drew a prize."

  • Draw (verb)

    To make a shot that lands in the house without hitting another stone.

  • Draw (verb)

    To play (a short-length ball directed at the leg stump) with an inclined bat so as to deflect the ball between the legs and the wicket.

  • Draw (verb)

    To hit (the ball) with the toe of the club so that it is deflected toward the left.

  • Draw (verb)

    To strike (the cue ball) below the center so as to give it a backward rotation which causes it to take a backward direction on striking another ball.

  • Draw (noun)

    The has won; a tie.

    "The game ended in a draw."

  • Draw (noun)

    The procedure by which the result of a lottery is determined.

    "The draw is on Saturday."

  • Draw (noun)

    Something that attracts e.g. a crowd.

  • Draw (noun)

    The result of a two-innings match in which at least one side did not complete all their innings before time ran out. Different from a tie.

  • Draw (noun)

    A golf shot that (for the right-handed player) curves intentionally to the left. See hook, slice, fade.

  • Draw (noun)

    A shot that lands in the house without hitting another stone.

  • Draw (noun)

    A dry stream bed that drains surface water only during periods of heavy rain or flooding.

  • Draw (noun)

    Cannabis.

  • Draw (noun)

    In a commission-based job, an advance on future (potential) commissions given to an employee by the employer.

  • Draw (noun)

    A situation in which one or more players has four cards of the same suit or four out of five necessary cards for a straight and requires a further card to make their flush or straight.

  • Draw (noun)

    The act of pulling back the strings in preparation of firing.

  • Draw (noun)

    The spin or twist imparted to a ball etc. by a drawing stroke.

  • Drag (noun)

    Resistance of the air (or some other fluid) to something moving through it.

    "When designing cars, manufacturers have to take drag into consideration."

  • Drag (noun)

    The bottom part of a sand casting mold.

  • Drag (noun)

    A device dragged along the bottom of a body of water in search of something, e.g. a dead body, or in fishing.

  • Drag (noun)

    A puff on a cigarette or joint.

  • Drag (noun)

    Someone or something that is annoying or frustrating, or disappointing; an obstacle to progress or enjoyment.

    "Travelling to work in the rush hour is a real drag."

  • Drag (noun)

    A type of horse-drawn carriage. from mid-18th c.

  • Drag (noun)

    Street, as in 'main drag'. from mid-19th c.

  • Drag (noun)

    The scent-path left by dragging a fox, for training hounds to follow scents.

    "to run a drag"

  • Drag (noun)

    A large amount of backspin on the cue ball, causing the cue ball to slow down.

  • Drag (noun)

    A heavy harrow for breaking up ground.

  • Drag (noun)

    A kind of sledge for conveying heavy objects; also, a kind of low car or handcart.

    "a stone drag"

  • Drag (noun)

    The bottom part of a flask or mould, the upper part being the cope.

  • Drag (noun)

    A steel instrument for completing the dressing of soft stone.

  • Drag (noun)

    The difference between the speed of a screw steamer under sail and that of the screw when the ship outruns the screw; or between the propulsive effects of the different floats of a paddle wheel.

  • Drag (noun)

    Anything towed in the water to retard a ship's progress, or to keep her head up to the wind; especially, a canvas bag with a hooped mouth (drag sail), so used.

  • Drag (noun)

    A skid or shoe for retarding the motion of a carriage wheel.

  • Drag (noun)

    Motion affected with slowness and difficulty, as if clogged.

  • Drag (noun)

    witch house music

  • Drag (noun)

    The last position in a line of hikers.

  • Drag (noun)

    The act of suppressing wind flow to slow an aircraft in flight, as by use of flaps when landing.

  • Drag (noun)

    Women's clothing worn by men for the purpose of entertainment. from late 19th c.

    "He performed in drag."

  • Drag (noun)

    Any type of clothing or costume associated with a particular occupation or subculture.

    "corporate drag"

  • Drag (verb)

    To pull along a surface or through a medium, sometimes with difficulty.

  • Drag (verb)

    To move slowly.

    "Time seems to drag when you’re waiting for a bus."

  • Drag (verb)

    To act or proceed slowly or without enthusiasm; to be reluctant.

  • Drag (verb)

    To move onward heavily, laboriously, or slowly; to advance with weary effort; to go on lingeringly.

  • Drag (verb)

    To draw along (something burdensome); hence, to pass in pain or with difficulty.

  • Drag (verb)

    To serve as a clog or hindrance; to hold back.

  • Drag (verb)

    To move (an item) on the computer display by means of a mouse or other input device.

    "Drag the file into the window to open it."

  • Drag (verb)

    (chiefly of a vehicle) To inadvertently rub or scrape on a surface.

    "The car was so low to the ground that its muffler was dragging on a speed bump."

  • Drag (verb)

    To hit or kick off target.

  • Drag (verb)

    To fish with a dragnet.

  • Drag (verb)

    To search for something, as a lost object or body, by dragging something along the bottom of a body of water.

  • Drag (verb)

    To break (land) by drawing a drag or harrow over it; to harrow.

  • Drag (verb)

    To search exhaustively, as if with a dragnet.

  • Drag (verb)

    To roast, say negative things about, or call attention to the flaws of (someone).

    "You just drag him 'cause he's got more money than you."

  • Drag (verb)

    To perform as a drag queen or drag king.

Wiktionary
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  • Draw (verb)

    produce (a picture or diagram) by making lines and marks on paper with a pencil, pen, etc.

    "he drew a map"

  • Draw (verb)

    produce an image of (someone or something) by making lines and marks on paper

    "I asked her to draw me"

    "you're at art college, you must be able to draw"

  • Draw (verb)

    trace or produce (a line or mark) on a surface

    "she drew a wavering line down the board"

  • Draw (verb)

    pull or drag (something such as a vehicle) so as to make it follow behind

    "a cart drawn by two horses"

  • Draw (verb)

    pull or move (something) in a specified direction

    "I drew back the blanket and uncovered the body"

  • Draw (verb)

    gently pull or guide (someone) in a specified direction

    "‘David,’ she whispered, drawing him aside"

  • Draw (verb)

    move somewhere in a slow steady way

    "the train drew in to the station"

  • Draw (verb)

    come to or arrive at a point in time or in a process

    "the campaign drew to a close"

  • Draw (verb)

    pull (curtains) shut or open

    "do you want me to draw the curtains?"

  • Draw (verb)

    make (wire) by pulling a piece of metal through successively smaller holes.

  • Draw (verb)

    extract (an object) from a container or receptacle

    "he drew his gun and peered into the gloomy apartment"

  • Draw (verb)

    take or obtain (liquid) from a container or receptacle

    "he drew off a pint of bitter"

    "a wheel was built to draw water from the well"

  • Draw (verb)

    run (a bath)

    "I would have been drawing his bath"

  • Draw (verb)

    obtain something from (a particular source)

    "an independent panel of judges drawn from members of the public"

  • Draw (verb)

    select (a ticket or name) randomly to decide winners in a lottery, opponents in a sporting contest, etc.

    "she drew a ticket and announced the number but no one claimed it"

  • Draw (verb)

    use (one's experience, talents, or skills) as a resource

    "Sue has a lot of past experience to draw on"

  • Draw (verb)

    obtain or withdraw (money) from a bank or other source

    "now I just draw out a spending allowance every week"

  • Draw (verb)

    search (cover) for game

    "many a time she had seen the hounds draw such a covert"

  • Draw (verb)

    (of the declarer) force the defenders to play (cards in a particular suit) by leading cards in that suit

    "before establishing his diamonds, declarer must draw trumps"

  • Draw (verb)

    suck smoke from (a cigarette or pipe)

    "she drew heavily on her cigarette"

  • Draw (verb)

    (of a chimney, flue, or fire) allow air to flow in and upwards freely, so that a fire can burn

    "failure of a fire to draw properly can have a number of causes"

  • Draw (verb)

    take in (a breath)

    "Mrs Feather drew a long breath"

  • Draw (verb)

    (of tea) be left standing so that the flavour is extracted from the leaves

    "a pot of tea is allowed to draw"

  • Draw (verb)

    disembowel

    "after a mockery of a trial he was hanged, drawn, and quartered"

  • Draw (verb)

    be the cause of (a specified response)

    "he drew criticism for his lavish spending"

  • Draw (verb)

    attract (someone) to come to a place or an event

    "you really drew the crowds with your playing"

  • Draw (verb)

    induce (someone) to reveal or do something

    "he refused to be drawn on what would happen"

  • Draw (verb)

    direct or attract (someone's attention) to something

    "it was an outrage and we had to draw people's attention to it"

    "a bright red instantly draws the eye"

  • Draw (verb)

    reach (a conclusion) by deduction or inference from a set of circumstances

    "the moral to be drawn is that spending wins votes"

  • Draw (verb)

    formulate or perceive (a comparison or distinction)

    "the law drew a clear distinction between innocent and fraudulent misrepresentation"

  • Draw (verb)

    select (a ticket or name) randomly to decide winners in a lottery, opponents in a sporting contest, etc.

    "she drew a ticket and announced the number but no one claimed it"

  • Draw (verb)

    finish (a contest or game) with an even score

    "they drew 0–0 in 1974"

    "Brazil had drawn a stormy match 1–1"

  • Draw (verb)

    (in bowls) cause (a bowl) to travel in a curve determined by its bias to the desired point.

  • Draw (verb)

    hit (the ball) so that it deviates slightly, usually as a result of spin

    "he had to learn to draw the ball—not least for the tee shots at Augusta"

  • Draw (verb)

    (of a ship) require (a specified depth of water) to float in

    "boats that draw only a few inches of water"

  • Draw (verb)

    (of a sail) be filled with wind

    "as the sail drew, he put the helm over to circle back"

  • Draw (noun)

    an act of selecting names randomly to decide winners in a lottery, opponents in a sporting contest, etc.

    "the draw has been made for this year's tournament"

  • Draw (noun)

    a game or contest that ends with the score even

    "he scored twice to force a 4–4 draw"

  • Draw (noun)

    a game which is left incomplete for lack of time, regardless of the scores.

  • Draw (noun)

    a person or thing that is very attractive or interesting

    "the museum has turned out to be a big draw for school children in the city"

  • Draw (noun)

    an act of drawing on a cigarette or cigar

    "she took a long draw on her cigarette"

  • Draw (noun)

    cannabis

    "they're dropping Es and smoking draw"

  • Draw (noun)

    an act of pulling a gun from its holster in order to shoot

    "he went for the quick draw and levelled a long-barrelled pistol at all of us"

  • Draw (noun)

    a shot causing the ball to deviate slightly

    "most high handicappers would benefit from a controlled draw"

  • Drag (verb)

    pull (someone or something) along forcefully, roughly, or with difficulty

    "we dragged the boat up the beach"

  • Drag (verb)

    take (someone) to or from a place or event, despite their reluctance

    "my girlfriend is dragging me off to Rhodes for a week"

  • Drag (verb)

    go somewhere wearily, reluctantly, or with difficulty

    "I have to drag myself out of bed each day"

  • Drag (verb)

    move (an image or highlighted text) across a computer screen using a tool such as a mouse

    "you can move the icons into this group by dragging them in with the mouse"

  • Drag (verb)

    (of a person's clothes or an animal's tail) trail along the ground

    "the nuns walked in meditation, their habits dragging on the grassy verge"

  • Drag (verb)

    catch hold of and pull (something)

    "desperately, Jinny dragged at his arm"

  • Drag (verb)

    (of a ship) trail (an anchor) along the seabed, drifting in the process

    "the coaster was dragging her anchor in St Ives Bay"

    "the anchor did not hold and they dragged further through the water"

  • Drag (verb)

    (of an anchor) fail to hold, causing a ship or boat to drift

    "his anchor had dragged and he found himself sailing out to sea"

  • Drag (verb)

    search the bottom of (a river, lake, or the sea) with grapnels or nets

    "frogmen had dragged the local river"

  • Drag (verb)

    (of time) pass slowly and tediously

    "the day dragged—eventually it was time for bed"

  • Drag (verb)

    (of a process or situation) continue at tedious and unnecessary length

    "the dispute between the two families dragged on for some years"

  • Drag (verb)

    protract something unnecessarily

    "he dragged out the process of serving them"

  • Drag (noun)

    the action of pulling something forcefully or with difficulty

    "the drag of the current"

  • Drag (noun)

    the longitudinal retarding force exerted by air or other fluid surrounding a moving object

    "the coating reduces aerodynamic drag"

  • Drag (noun)

    a person or thing that impedes progress or development

    "Larry was turning out to be a drag on her career"

  • Drag (noun)

    unnatural motion of a fishing fly caused by the pull of the line.

  • Drag (noun)

    an iron shoe that can be applied as a brake to the wheel of a cart or wagon.

  • Drag (noun)

    a boring or tiresome person or thing

    "working nine to five can be a drag"

  • Drag (noun)

    an act of inhaling smoke from a cigarette

    "he took a long drag on his cigarette"

  • Drag (noun)

    clothing more conventionally worn by the opposite sex, especially women's clothes worn by a man

    "a fashion show, complete with men in drag"

  • Drag (noun)

    a street or road

    "the main drag is wide but there are few vehicles"

  • Drag (noun)

    a thing that is pulled along the ground or through water.

  • Drag (noun)

    a harrow used for breaking up the surface of land.

  • Drag (noun)

    an apparatus for dredging or for recovering objects from the bottom of a river or lake.

  • Drag (noun)

    another term for dragnet

  • Drag (noun)

    a strong-smelling lure drawn before hounds as a substitute for a fox.

  • Drag (noun)

    a hunt using a drag lure.

  • Drag (noun)

    influence over other people

    "they had the education but they didn't have the drag"

  • Drag (noun)

    one of the basic patterns (rudiments) of drumming, consisting of a stroke preceded by two grace notes usually played with the other stick.

  • Drag (noun)

    short for drag race

  • Drag (noun)

    a private vehicle like a stagecoach, drawn by four horses.

  • Drag (noun)

    a car

    "a stately great drag with a smart chauffeur"

Oxford Dictionary
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  • Draw

    To cause to move continuously by force applied in advance of the thing moved; to pull along; to haul; to drag; to cause to follow.

  • Draw

    To influence to move or tend toward one's self; to exercise an attracting force upon; to call towards itself; to attract; hence, to entice; to allure; to induce.

  • Draw

    To cause to come out for one's use or benefit; to extract; to educe; to bring forth; as: (a) To bring or take out, or to let out, from some receptacle, as a stick or post from a hole, water from a cask or well, etc.

  • Draw

    To pull from a sheath, as a sword.

  • Draw

    To remove the contents of

  • Draw

    To extract; to force out; to elicit; to derive.

  • Draw

    To extract the bowels of; to eviscerate; as, to draw a fowl; to hang, draw, and quarter a criminal.

  • Draw

    To take into the lungs; to inhale; to inspire; hence, also, to utter or produce by an inhalation; to heave.

  • Draw

    To obtain from some cause or origin; to infer from evidence or reasons; to deduce from premises; to derive.

  • Draw

    To extend in length; to lengthen; to protract; to stretch; to extend, as a mass of metal into wire.

  • Draw

    To take or procure from a place of deposit; to call for and receive from a fund, or the like; as, to draw money from a bank.

  • Draw

    To run, extend, or produce, as a line on any surface; hence, also, to form by marking; to make by an instrument of delineation; to produce, as a sketch, figure, or picture.

  • Draw

    To represent by lines drawn; to form a sketch or a picture of; to represent by a picture; to delineate; hence, to represent by words; to depict; to describe.

  • Draw

    To write in due form; to prepare a draught of; as, to draw a memorial, a deed, or bill of exchange.

  • Draw

    To require (so great a depth, as of water) for floating; - said of a vessel; to sink so deep in (water); as, a ship draws ten feet of water.

  • Draw

    To withdraw.

  • Draw

    To trace by scent; to track; - a hunting term.

  • Draw

    To play (a short-length ball directed at the leg stump) with an inclined bat so as to deflect the ball between the legs and the wicket.

  • Draw

    To leave (a contest) undecided; as, the battle or game was drawn.

  • Draw (verb)

    To pull; to exert strength in drawing anything; to have force to move anything by pulling; as, a horse draws well; the sails of a ship draw well.

  • Draw (verb)

    To draw a liquid from some receptacle, as water from a well.

  • Draw (verb)

    To exert an attractive force; to act as an inducement or enticement.

  • Draw (verb)

    To have efficiency as an epispastic; to act as a sinapism; - said of a blister, poultice, etc.

  • Draw (verb)

    To have draught, as a chimney, flue, or the like; to furnish transmission to smoke, gases, etc.

  • Draw (verb)

    To unsheathe a weapon, especially a sword.

  • Draw (verb)

    To perform the act, or practice the art, of delineation; to sketch; to form figures or pictures.

  • Draw (verb)

    To become contracted; to shrink.

  • Draw (verb)

    To move; to come or go; literally, to draw one's self; - with prepositions and adverbs; as, to draw away, to move off, esp. in racing, to get in front; to obtain the lead or increase it; to draw back, to retreat; to draw level, to move up even (with another); to come up to or overtake another; to draw off, to retire or retreat; to draw on, to advance; to draw up, to form in array; to draw near, draw nigh, or draw towards, to approach; to draw together, to come together, to collect.

  • Draw (verb)

    To make a draft or written demand for payment of money deposited or due; - usually with on or upon.

  • Draw (verb)

    To admit the action of pulling or dragging; to undergo draught; as, a carriage draws easily.

  • Draw (verb)

    To sink in water; to require a depth for floating.

  • Draw (noun)

    The act of drawing; draught.

  • Draw (noun)

    A lot or chance to be drawn.

  • Draw (noun)

    the act of drawing a lot or chance.

  • Draw (noun)

    A drawn game or battle, etc; a tied game; a tie.

  • Draw (noun)

    That part of a bridge which may be raised, swung round, or drawn aside; the movable part of a drawbridge. See the Note under Drawbridge.

  • Draw (noun)

    The result of drawing, or state of being drawn;

  • Draw (noun)

    That which is drawn or is subject to drawing.

  • Drag (noun)

    A confection; a comfit; a drug.

  • Drag (noun)

    The act of dragging; anything which is dragged.

  • Drag (noun)

    A net, or an apparatus, to be drawn along the bottom under water, as in fishing, searching for drowned persons, etc.

  • Drag (noun)

    A kind of sledge for conveying heavy bodies; also, a kind of low car or handcart; as, a stone drag.

  • Drag (noun)

    A heavy coach with seats on top; also, a heavy carriage.

  • Drag (noun)

    A heavy harrow, for breaking up ground.

  • Drag (noun)

    Anything towed in the water to retard a ship's progress, or to keep her head up to the wind; esp., a canvas bag with a hooped mouth, so used. See Drag sail (below).

  • Drag (noun)

    Motion affected with slowness and difficulty, as if clogged.

  • Drag (noun)

    The bottom part of a flask or mold, the upper part being the cope.

  • Drag (noun)

    A steel instrument for completing the dressing of soft stone.

  • Drag (noun)

    The difference between the speed of a screw steamer under sail and that of the screw when the ship outruns the screw; or between the propulsive effects of the different floats of a paddle wheel. See Citation under Drag, v. i., 3.

  • Drag

    To draw slowly or heavily onward; to pull along the ground by main force; to haul; to trail; - applied to drawing heavy or resisting bodies or those inapt for drawing, with labor, along the ground or other surface; as, to drag stone or timber; to drag a net in fishing.

  • Drag

    To break, as land, by drawing a drag or harrow over it; to harrow; to draw a drag along the bottom of, as a stream or other water; hence, to search, as by means of a drag.

  • Drag

    To draw along, as something burdensome; hence, to pass in pain or with difficulty.

  • Drag (verb)

    To be drawn along, as a rope or dress, on the ground; to trail; to be moved onward along the ground, or along the bottom of the sea, as an anchor that does not hold.

  • Drag (verb)

    To move onward heavily, laboriously, or slowly; to advance with weary effort; to go on lingeringly.

  • Drag (verb)

    To serve as a clog or hindrance; to hold back.

  • Drag (verb)

    To fish with a dragnet.

Webster Dictionary
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  • Draw (noun)

    a gully that is shallower than a ravine

  • Draw (noun)

    an entertainer who attracts large audiences;

    "he was the biggest drawing card they had"

  • Draw (noun)

    the finish of a contest in which the score is tied and the winner is undecided;

    "the game ended in a draw"

    "their record was 3 wins, 6 losses and a tie"

  • Draw (noun)

    anything (straws or pebbles etc.) taken or chosen at random;

    "the luck of the draw"

    "they drew lots for it"

  • Draw (noun)

    a playing card or cards dealt or taken from the pack;

    "he got a pair of kings in the draw"

  • Draw (noun)

    a golf shot that curves to the left for a right-handed golfer;

    "he tooks lessons to cure his hooking"

  • Draw (noun)

    (American football) the quarterback moves back as if to pass and then hands the ball to the fullback who is running toward the line of scrimmage

  • Draw (noun)

    poker in which a player can discard cards and receive substitutes from the dealer;

    "he played only draw and stud"

  • Draw (noun)

    the act of drawing or hauling something;

    "the haul up the hill went very slowly"

  • Draw (verb)

    cause to move along the ground by pulling;

    "draw a wagon"

    "pull a sled"

  • Draw (verb)

    get or derive;

    "He drew great benefits from his membership in the association"

  • Draw (verb)

    make a mark or lines on a surface;

    "draw a line"

    "trace the outline of a figure in the sand"

  • Draw (verb)

    make, formulate, or derive in the mind;

    "I draw a line here"

    "draw a conclusion"

    "draw parallels"

    "make an estimate"

    "What do you make of his remarks?"

  • Draw (verb)

    bring, take, or pull out of a container or from under a cover;

    "draw a weapon"

    "pull out a gun"

    "The mugger pulled a knife on his victim"

  • Draw (verb)

    represent by making a drawing of, as with a pencil, chalk, etc. on a surface;

    "She drew an elephant"

    "Draw me a horse"

  • Draw (verb)

    take liquid out of a container or well;

    "She drew water from the barrel"

  • Draw (verb)

    give a description of;

    "He drew an elaborate plan of attack"

  • Draw (verb)

    select or take in from a given group or region;

    "The participants in the experiment were drawn from a representative population"

  • Draw (verb)

    elicit responses, such as objections, criticism, applause, etc.;

    "The President's comments drew sharp criticism from the Republicans"

    "The comedian drew a lot of laughter"

  • Draw (verb)

    suck in or take (air);

    "draw a deep breath"

    "draw on a cigarette"

  • Draw (verb)

    move or go steadily or gradually;

    "The ship drew near the shore"

  • Draw (verb)

    remove (a commodity) from (a supply source);

    "She drew $2,000 from the account"

    "The doctors drew medical supplies from the hospital's emergency bank"

  • Draw (verb)

    choose at random;

    "draw a card"

    "cast lots"

  • Draw (verb)

    in baseball: earn or achieve a base by being walked by the pitcher;

    "He drew a base on balls"

  • Draw (verb)

    bring or lead someone to a certain action or condition;

    "She was drawn to despair"

    "The President refused to be drawn into delivering an ultimatum"

    "The session was drawn to a close"

  • Draw (verb)

    cause to flow;

    "The nurse drew blood"

  • Draw (verb)

    write a legal document or paper;

    "The deed was drawn in the lawyer's office"

  • Draw (verb)

    engage in drawing;

    "He spent the day drawing in the garden"

  • Draw (verb)

    move or pull so as to cover or uncover something;

    "draw the shades"

    "draw the curtains"

  • Draw (verb)

    allow a draft;

    "This chimney draws very well"

  • Draw (verb)

    require a specified depth for floating;

    "This boat draws 70 inches"

  • Draw (verb)

    pull (a person) apart with four horses tied to his extremities, so as to execute him;

    "in the old days, people were drawn and quartered for certain crimes"

  • Draw (verb)

    take in, also metaphorically;

    "The sponge absorbs water well"

    "She drew strength from the minister's words"

  • Draw (verb)

    direct toward itself or oneself by means of some psychological power or physical attributes;

    "Her good looks attract the stares of many men"

    "The ad pulled in many potential customers"

    "This pianist pulls huge crowds"

    "The store owner was happy that the ad drew in many new customers"

  • Draw (verb)

    thread on or as if on a string;

    "string pearls on a string"

    "the child drew glass beads on a string"

    "thread dried cranberries"

  • Draw (verb)

    pull back the sling of (a bow);

    "The archers were drawing their bows"

  • Draw (verb)

    guide or pass over something;

    "He ran his eyes over her body"

    "She ran her fingers along the carved figurine"

    "He drew her hair through his fingers"

  • Draw (verb)

    finish a game with an equal number of points, goals, etc.;

    "The teams drew a tie"

  • Draw (verb)

    contract;

    "The material drew after it was washed in hot water"

  • Draw (verb)

    reduce the diameter of (a wire or metal rod) by pulling it through a die;

    "draw wire"

  • Draw (verb)

    steep; pass through a strainer;

    "draw pulp from the fruit"

  • Draw (verb)

    remove the entrails of;

    "draw a chicken"

  • Draw (verb)

    flatten, stretch, or mold metal or glass, by rolling or by pulling it through a die or by stretching;

    "draw steel"

  • Draw (verb)

    cause to localize at one point;

    "Draw blood and pus"

  • Drag (noun)

    the phenomenon of resistance to motion through a fluid

  • Drag (noun)

    something that slows or delays progress;

    "taxation is a drag on the economy"

    "too many laws are a drag on the use of new land"

  • Drag (noun)

    something tedious and boring;

    "peeling potatoes is a drag"

  • Drag (noun)

    clothing that is conventionally worn by the opposite sex (especially women's clothing when worn by a man);

    "he went to the party dressed in drag"

    "the waitresses looked like missionaries in drag"

  • Drag (noun)

    a slow inhalation (as of tobacco smoke);

    "he took a puff on his pipe"

    "he took a drag on his cigarette and expelled the smoke slowly"

  • Drag (noun)

    the act of dragging (pulling with force);

    "the drag up the hill exhausted him"

  • Drag (verb)

    pull, as against a resistance;

    "He dragged the big suitcase behind him"

    "These worries were dragging at him"

  • Drag (verb)

    draw slowly or heavily;

    "haul stones"

    "haul nets"

  • Drag (verb)

    force into some kind of situation, condition, or course of action;

    "They were swept up by the events"

    "don't drag me into this business"

  • Drag (verb)

    move slowly and as if with great effort

  • Drag (verb)

    to lag or linger behind;

    "But in so many other areas we still are dragging"

  • Drag (verb)

    suck in or take (air);

    "draw a deep breath"

    "draw on a cigarette"

  • Drag (verb)

    use a computer mouse to move icons on the screen and select commands from a menu;

    "drag this icon to the lower right hand corner of the screen"

  • Drag (verb)

    walk without lifting the feet

  • Drag (verb)

    search (as the bottom of a body of water) for something valuable or lost

  • Drag (verb)

    persuade to come away from something attractive or interesting;

    "He dragged me away from the television set"

  • Drag (verb)

    proceed for an extended period of time;

    "The speech dragged on for two hours"

Princeton's WordNet

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