VS.

Pin vs. Pit

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Pinnoun

A sewing pin or ballhead pin: a needle without an eye (usually) made of drawn-out steel wire with one end sharpened and the other flattened or rounded into a head, used for fastening.

Pitnoun

A hole in the ground.

Pinnoun

A small nail with a head and a sharp point.

Pitnoun

(motor racing) An area at a motor racetrack used for refueling and repairing the vehicles during a race.

Pinnoun

A cylinder often of wood or metal used to fasten or as a bearing between two parts.

‘Pull the pin out of the grenade before throwing it at the enemy.’;

Pitnoun

(music) A section of the marching band containing mallet percussion instruments and other large percussion instruments too large to march, such as the tam tam. Also, the area on the sidelines where these instruments are placed.

Pinnoun

(wrestling) The victory condition of holding the opponent's shoulders on the wrestling mat for a prescribed period of time.

Pitnoun

A mine.

Pinnoun

A slender object specially designed for use in a specific game or sport, such as skittles or bowling.

Pitnoun

(archaeology) A hole or trench in the ground, excavated according to grid coordinates, so that the provenance of any feature observed and any specimen or artifact revealed may be established by precise measurement.

Pinnoun

(in plural pins; informal) A leg.

‘I'm not so good on my pins these days.’;

Pitnoun

(trading) A trading pit.

Pinnoun

(electricity) Any of the individual connecting elements of a multipole electrical connector.

‘The UK standard connector for domestic mains electricity has three pins.’;

Pitnoun

The bottom part of something.

‘I felt pain in the pit of my stomach.’;

Pinnoun

A piece of jewellery that is attached to clothing with a pin.

Pitnoun

(colloquial) Armpit.

Pinnoun

(US) A simple accessory that can be attached to clothing with a pin or fastener, often round and bearing a design, logo or message, and used for decoration, identification or to show political affiliation, etc.

Pitnoun

(aviation) A luggage hold.

Pinnoun

(chess) A scenario in which moving a lesser piece to escape from attack would expose a more valuable piece to attack.

Pitnoun

(countable) A small surface hole or depression, a fossa.

Pinnoun

(golf) The flagstick: the flag-bearing pole which marks the location of a hole

Pitnoun

The indented mark left by a pustule, as in smallpox.

Pinnoun

(curling) The spot at the exact centre of the house (the target area)

‘The shot landed right on the pin.’;

Pitnoun

The grave, or underworld.

Pinnoun

(dated) A mood, a state of being.

Pitnoun

An enclosed area into which gamecocks, dogs, and other animals are brought to fight, or where dogs are trained to kill rats.

Pinnoun

One of a row of pegs in the side of an ancient drinking cup to mark how much each person should drink.

Pitnoun

Formerly, that part of a theatre, on the floor of the house, below the level of the stage and behind the orchestra; now, in England, commonly the part behind the stalls; in the United States, the parquet; also, the occupants of such a part of a theatre.

Pinnoun

caligo

Pitnoun

(gambling) Part of a casino which typically holds tables for blackjack, craps, roulette, and other games.

Pinnoun

A thing of small value; a trifle.

Pitnoun

(slang) A pit bull terrier.

‘I'm taking one of my pits to the vet on Thursday.’;

Pinnoun

A peg in musical instruments for increasing or relaxing the tension of the strings.

Pitnoun

.

‘His circus job was the pits, but at least he was in show business.’;

Pinnoun

(engineering) A short shaft, sometimes forming a bolt, a part of which serves as a journal.

Pitnoun

(slang) A mosh pit.

Pinnoun

The tenon of a dovetail joint.

Pitnoun

A seed inside a fruit; a stone or pip inside a fruit.

Pinnoun

A size of brewery cask, equal to half a firkin, or eighth of a barrel.

Pitnoun

A shell in a drupe containing a seed.

Pinnoun

(informal) A pinball machine.

‘I spent most of my time in the arcade playing pins.’;

Pitnoun

The core of an implosion weapon, consisting of the fissile material and any neutron reflector or tamper bonded to it.

Pinverb

(often followed by a preposition such as "to" or "on") To fasten or attach (something) with a pin.

Pitnoun

(informal) A pit bull terrier.

Pinverb

To cause (a piece) to be in a pin.

Pitverb

(transitive) To make pits in; to mark with little hollows.

‘Exposure to acid rain pitted the metal.’;

Pinverb

(wrestling) To pin down (someone).

Pitverb

To put (an animal) into a pit for fighting.

Pinverb

To enclose; to confine; to pen; to pound.

Pitverb

(transitive) To bring (something) into opposition with something else.

‘Are you ready to pit your wits against one of the world's greatest puzzles?’;

Pinverb

To attach (an icon, application, etc.) to another item.

‘to pin a window to the Taskbar’;

Pitverb

To return to the pits during a race for refuelling, tyre changes, repairs etc.

Pinverb

To fix (an array in memory, a security certificate, etc.) so that it cannot be modified.

‘When marshaling data, the interop marshaler can copy or pin the data being marshaled.’;

Pitverb

(transitive) To remove the stone from a stone fruit or the shell from a drupe.

‘One must pit a peach to make it ready for a pie.’;

Pinverb

alternative form of peen

Pitnoun

A large cavity or hole in the ground, either natural or artificial; a cavity in the surface of a body; an indentation

‘Tumble me into some loathsome pit.’;

Pinverb

To peen.

Pitnoun

Any abyss; especially, the grave, or hades.

‘Back to the infernal pit I drag thee chained.’; ‘He keepth back his soul from the pit.’;

Pinverb

To inclose; to confine; to pen; to pound.

Pitnoun

A covered deep hole for entrapping wild beasts; a pitfall; hence, a trap; a snare. Also used figuratively.

‘The anointed of the Lord was taken in their pits.’;

Pinverb

To fasten with, or as with, a pin; to join; as, to pin a garment; to pin boards together.

Pitnoun

A depression or hollow in the surface of the human body

Pinnoun

A piece of wood, metal, etc., generally cylindrical, used for fastening separate articles together, or as a support by which one article may be suspended from another; a peg; a bolt.

‘With pins of adamantAnd chains they made all fast.’;

Pitnoun

Formerly, that part of a theater, on the floor of the house, below the level of the stage and behind the orchestra; now, in England, commonly the part behind the stalls; in the United States, the parquet; also, the occupants of such a part of a theater.

Pinnoun

Especially, a small, pointed and headed piece of brass or other wire (commonly tinned), largely used for fastening clothes, attaching papers, etc.

Pitnoun

An inclosed area into which gamecocks, dogs, and other animals are brought to fight, or where dogs are trained to kill rats.

Pinnoun

Hence, a thing of small value; a trifle.

‘He . . . did not care a pin for her.’;

Pitnoun

The endocarp of a drupe, and its contained seed or seeds; a stone; as, a peach pit; a cherry pit, etc.

Pinnoun

That which resembles a pin in its form or use

Pitverb

To place or put into a pit or hole.

‘They lived like beasts, and were pitted like beasts, tumbled into the grave.’;

Pinnoun

One of a row of pegs in the side of an ancient drinking cup to mark how much each man should drink.

Pitverb

To mark with little hollows, as by various pustules; as, a face pitted by smallpox.

Pinnoun

The bull's eye, or center, of a target; hence, the center.

Pitverb

To introduce as an antagonist; to set forward for or in a contest; as, to pit one dog against another.

Pinnoun

Mood; humor.

Pitnoun

a sizeable hole (usually in the ground);

‘they dug a pit to bury the body’;

Pinnoun

Caligo. See Caligo.

Pitnoun

a concavity in a surface (especially an anatomical depression)

Pinnoun

An ornament, as a brooch or badge, fastened to the clothing by a pin; as, a Masonic pin.

Pitnoun

the hard inner (usually woody) layer of the pericarp of some fruits (as peaches or plums or cherries or olives) that contains the seed;

‘you should remove the stones from prunes before cooking’;

Pinnoun

The leg; as, to knock one off his pins.

Pitnoun

a trap in the form of a concealed hole

Pinnoun

a piece of jewelry that is pinned onto the wearer's garment

Pitnoun

a surface excavation for extracting stone or slate;

‘a British term for `quarry' is `stone pit'’;

Pinnoun

when a wrestler's shoulders are forced to the mat

Pitnoun

lowered area in front of a stage where an orchestra accompanies the performers

Pinnoun

small markers inserted into a surface to mark scores or define locations etc.

Pitnoun

a workplace consisting of a coal mine plus all the buildings and equipment connected with it

Pinnoun

a number you choose and use to gain access to various accounts

Pitverb

set into opposition or rivalry;

‘let them match their best athletes against ours’; ‘pit a chess player against the Russian champion’; ‘He plays his two children off against each other’;

Pinnoun

informal terms of the leg;

‘fever left him weak on his sticks’;

Pitverb

mark with a scar;

‘The skin disease scarred his face permanently’;

Pinnoun

axis consisting of a short shaft that supports something that turns

Pitverb

remove the pits from;

‘pit plums and cherries’;

Pinnoun

cylindrical tumblers consisting of two parts that are held in place by springs; when they are aligned with a key the bolt can be thrown

Pitnoun

a large hole in the ground.

Pinnoun

flagpole used to mark the position of the hole on a golf green

Pitnoun

a large deep hole from which stones or minerals are quarried

‘a gravel pit’;

Pinnoun

a small slender (often pointed) piece of wood or metal used to support or fasten or attach things

Pitnoun

a coal mine

‘the recent protests over planned pit closures’;

Pinnoun

a holder attached to the gunwale of a boat that holds the oar in place and acts as a fulcrum for rowing

Pitnoun

a sunken area in a workshop floor allowing access to a car's underside.

Pinnoun

a club-shaped wooden object used in bowling; set up in groups as a target

Pitnoun

a low or wretched psychological state

‘a black pit of depression’;

Pinverb

to hold fast or prevent from moving;

‘The child was pinned under the fallen tree’;

Pitnoun

hell.

Pinverb

attach or fasten with pins

Pitnoun

a hollow or indentation in a surface.

Pinverb

pierce with a pin;

‘pin down the butterfly’;

Pitnoun

a small indentation left on the skin by a pustule or spot; a pockmark.

Pinverb

immobilize a piece

Pitnoun

an area at the side of a track where racing cars are serviced and refuelled

‘he had a flat tyre when he came into the pits’; ‘the pit lane’;

Pinnoun

an identifying number allocated to an individual by a bank or other organization and used for validating electronic transactions.

Pitnoun

an orchestra pit.

Pinverb

attach or fasten with a pin or pins

‘her hair was pinned back’; ‘he pinned the badge on to his lapel’;

Pitnoun

the seating at the back of the stalls of a theatre.

Pinverb

hold (someone) firmly in a specified position so they are unable to move

‘Richards pinned him down until the police arrived’; ‘she was standing pinned against the door’;

Pitnoun

a part of the floor of a stock exchange in which a particular stock or commodity is traded

‘the trading pit of the Singapore International Monetary Exchange’; ‘pooled commodity funds liquidated positions in the corn and soybean pits’;

Pinverb

hinder or prevent (a piece or pawn) from moving because of the danger to a more valuable piece standing behind it along the line of an attack

‘the black rook on e4 is pinned’;

Pitnoun

an enclosure in which animals are made to fight

‘a bear pit’;

Pin

A pin is a device used for fastening objects or material together, and can have three sorts of body: a shaft of a rigid inflexible material meant to be inserted in a slot, groove, or hole (as with pivots, hinges, and jigs); a shaft connected to a head and ending in a sharp tip meant to pierce one or more pieces of soft materials like cloth or paper (the straight or push pin); a single strip of a rigid but flexible material (e.g. a wire) whose length has been folded into parallel prongs in such fashion that the middle length of each curves towards the other so that, when anything is inserted between them, they act as a clamp (e.g.

Pitnoun

a person's bed.

Pitnoun

a person's armpit.

Pitnoun

the stone of a fruit.

Pitverb

set someone or something in conflict or competition with

‘you'll get the chance to pit your wits against the world champions’;

Pitverb

set an animal to fight against (another animal) for sport

‘there were usually three dogs pitted against one lion’;

Pitverb

make a hollow or indentation in the surface of

‘rain poured down, pitting the bare earth’;

Pitverb

sink in or contract so as to form a pit or hollow.

Pitverb

drive a racing car into the pits for fuel or maintenance

‘he pitted on lap 36 with sudden engine trouble’;

Pitverb

remove the pit from (fruit).

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