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Pace vs. Rhythm

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  • Pace (noun)

    Passage, route.

  • Pace (noun)

    One's journey or route. 14th-18th century

  • Pace (noun)

    A passage through difficult terrain; a mountain pass or route vulnerable to ambush etc. 14th-17th century

  • Pace (noun)

    Step.

  • Pace (noun)

    An aisle in a church. 15th-19th century

  • Pace (noun)

    A step taken with the foot. from 14th century

  • Pace (noun)

    Way of stepping.

  • Pace (noun)

    The distance covered in a step (or sometimes two), either vaguely or according to various specific set measurements.[http://www.unc.edu/~rowlett/units/custom.html How Many? A Dictionary of Units of Measurement]: English Customary Weights and Measures, © Russ Rowlett and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (§: Distance, ¶ № 6) from 14th century

    "Even at the duel, standing 10 paces apart, he could have satisfied Aaron’s honor."

    "I have perambulated your field, and estimate its perimeter to be 219 paces."

  • Pace (noun)

    A manner of walking, running or dancing; the rate or style of how someone moves with their feet. from 14th century

  • Pace (noun)

    Speed or velocity in general. from 15th century

  • Pace (noun)

    A measure of the hardness of a pitch and of the tendency of a cricket ball to maintain its speed after bouncing. from 19th century

  • Pace (noun)

    A group of donkeys. The collective noun for donkeys.

  • Pace (noun)

    Easter.

  • Pace (adjective)

    Describing a bowler who bowls fast balls.

  • Pace (verb)

    Walk to and fro in a small space.

  • Pace (verb)

    Set the speed in a race.

  • Pace (verb)

    Measure by walking.

  • Pace (preposition)

    With all due respect to.

  • Rhythm (noun)

    The variation of strong and weak elements (such as duration, accent) of sounds, notably in speech or music, over time; a beat or meter.

    "Dance to the rhythm of the music."

  • Rhythm (noun)

    A specifically defined pattern of such variation.

    "Most dances have a rhythm as distinctive as the Iambic verse in poetry"

  • Rhythm (noun)

    A flow, repetition or regularity.

    "Once you get the rhythm of it, the job will become easy."

  • Rhythm (noun)

    The tempo or speed of a beat, song or repetitive event.

    "We walked with a quick, even rhythm."

  • Rhythm (noun)

    The musical instruments which provide rhythm (mainly; not or less melody) in a musical ensemble.

    "The Baroque term basso continuo is virtually equivalent to rhythm"

  • Rhythm (noun)

    A regular quantitative change in a variable (notably natural) process.

  • Rhythm (noun)

    Controlled repetition of a phrase, incident or other element as a stylistic figure in literature and other narrative arts; the effect it creates.

    "''The running gag is a popular rhythm in motion pictures and theater comedy"

Wiktionary
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Oxford Dictionary
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  • Pace (noun)

    A single movement from one foot to the other in walking; a step.

  • Pace (noun)

    The length of a step in walking or marching, reckoned from the heel of one foot to the heel of the other; - used as a unit in measuring distances; as, he advanced fifty paces.

  • Pace (noun)

    Manner of stepping or moving; gait; walk; as, the walk, trot, canter, gallop, and amble are paces of the horse; a swaggering pace; a quick pace.

  • Pace (noun)

    A slow gait; a footpace.

  • Pace (noun)

    Specifically, a kind of fast amble; a rack.

  • Pace (noun)

    Any single movement, step, or procedure.

  • Pace (noun)

    A broad step or platform; any part of a floor slightly raised above the rest, as around an altar, or at the upper end of a hall.

  • Pace (noun)

    A device in a loom, to maintain tension on the warp in pacing the web.

  • Pace (noun)

    The rate of progress of any process or activity; as, the students ran at a rapid pace; the plants grew at a remarkable pace.

  • Pace (verb)

    To go; to walk; specifically, to move with regular or measured steps.

  • Pace (verb)

    To proceed; to pass on.

  • Pace (verb)

    To move quickly by lifting the legs on the same side together, as a horse; to amble with rapidity; to rack.

  • Pace (verb)

    To pass away; to die.

  • Pace

    To walk over with measured tread; to move slowly over or upon; as, the guard paces his round.

  • Pace

    To measure by steps or paces; as, to pace a piece of ground. Often used with out; as, to pace out the distance.

  • Pace

    To develop, guide, or control the pace or paces of; to teach the pace; to break in.

  • Rhythm (noun)

    In the widest sense, a dividing into short portions by a regular succession of motions, impulses, sounds, accents, etc., producing an agreeable effect, as in music poetry, the dance, or the like.

  • Rhythm (noun)

    Movement in musical time, with periodical recurrence of accent; the measured beat or pulse which marks the character and expression of the music; symmetry of movement and accent.

  • Rhythm (noun)

    A division of lines into short portions by a regular succession of arses and theses, or percussions and remissions of voice on words or syllables.

  • Rhythm (noun)

    The harmonious flow of vocal sounds.

Webster Dictionary
  • Pace (noun)

    the rate of moving (especially walking or running)

  • Pace (noun)

    the distance covered by a step;

    "he stepped off ten paces from the old tree and began to dig"

  • Pace (noun)

    the relative speed of progress or change;

    "he lived at a fast pace"

    "he works at a great rate"

    "the pace of events accelerated"

  • Pace (noun)

    a step in walking or running

  • Pace (noun)

    the rate of some repeating event

  • Pace (noun)

    a unit of length equal to 3 feet; defined as 91.44 centimeters; originally taken to be the average length of a stride

  • Pace (verb)

    walk with slow or fast paces;

    "He paced up and down the hall"

  • Pace (verb)

    go at a pace;

    "The horse paced"

  • Pace (verb)

    measure (distances) by pacing;

    "step off ten yards"

  • Pace (verb)

    regulate or set the pace of;

    "Pace your efforts"

  • Rhythm (noun)

    the basic rhythmic unit in a piece of music;

    "the piece has a fast rhythm"

    "the conductor set the beat"

  • Rhythm (noun)

    recurring at regular intervals

  • Rhythm (noun)

    an interval during which a recurring sequence of events occurs;

    "the neverending cycle of the seasons"

  • Rhythm (noun)

    the arrangement of spoken words alternating stressed and unstressed elements;

    "the rhythm of Frost's poetry"

  • Rhythm (noun)

    natural family planning in which ovulation is assumed to occur 14 days before the onset of a period (the fertile period would be assumed to extend from day 10 through day 18 of her cycle)

Princeton's WordNet

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