VS.

Motion vs. Resolution

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Motionnoun

(uncountable) A state of progression from one place to another.

Resolutionnoun

A strong will, determination.

Motionnoun

(countable) A change of position with respect to time.

Resolutionnoun

The state of being resolute.

‘His stalwart resolution is perhaps admirable, perhaps foolish.’;

Motionnoun

(physics) A change from one place to another.

Resolutionnoun

A statement of intent, a vow

‘By February, most New Year's resolutions are forgotten.’; ‘My resolution is to cut back on the fast food this year.’;

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Motionnoun

(countable) A parliamentary action to propose something. A similar procedure in any official or business meeting.

‘The motion to amend is now open for discussion.’;

Resolutionnoun

The act of discerning detail.

Motionnoun

(obsolete) An entertainment or show, especially a puppet show.

Motionnoun

(philosophy) from κίνησις (kinesis); any change. Traditionally of four types: generation and corruption, alteration, augmentation and diminution, and change of place.

Resolutionnoun

(computing) The number of pixels in an image being stored or displayed.

‘This monitor's maximum resolution is 1600 × 1200.’;

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Motionnoun

Movement of the mind, desires, or passions; mental act, or impulse to any action; internal activity.

Resolutionnoun

(computing) The process of determining the meaning of a symbol or address; lookup.

‘name resolution’;

Motionnoun

(law) A formal request, oral or written, made to a judge or court of law to obtain an official court ruling or order for a legal action to be taken by, or on behalf of, the movant.

Resolutionnoun

(math) The act or process of solving; solution.

‘the resolution of an equation’;

Motionnoun

(euphemistic) A movement of the bowels; the product of such movement.

Resolutionnoun

A formal statement adopted by an assembly, or during any other formal meeting.

‘The resolution was passed by a two-thirds majority.’;

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Motionnoun

(music) Change of pitch in successive sounds, whether in the same part or in groups of parts. (Conjunct motion is that by single degrees of the scale. Contrary motion is when parts move in opposite directions. Disjunct motion is motion by skips. Oblique motion is when one part is stationary while another moves. Similar or direct motion is when parts move in the same direction.)

Resolutionnoun

(sciences) The separation of the constituent parts (of a spectrum etc).

Motionnoun

(obsolete) A puppet, or puppet show.

Resolutionnoun

(sciences) The degree of fineness of such a separation.

Motionverb

To gesture indicating a desired movement.

‘He motioned for me to come closer.’;

Resolutionnoun

(music) Progression from dissonance to consonance; a chord to which such progression is made.

Motionverb

(proscribed) To introduce a motion in parliamentary procedure.

Resolutionnoun

(literature) The moment in which the conflict ends and the outcome of the action is clear.

Motionverb

To make a proposal; to offer plans.

Resolutionnoun

(medicine) In a pathological process, the phase during which pathogens and damaged tissues are removed by macrophages.

Motionnoun

The act, process, or state of changing place or position; movement; the passing of a body from one place or position to another, whether voluntary or involuntary; - opposed to rest.

‘Speaking or mute, all comeliness and graceattends thee, and each word, each motion, forms.’;

Resolutionnoun

The act, operation, or process of resolving.

‘The unraveling and resolution of the difficulties that are met with in the execution of the design are the end of an action.’;

Motionnoun

Power of, or capacity for, motion.

‘Devoid of sense and motion.’;

Resolutionnoun

The state of being relaxed; relaxation.

Motionnoun

Direction of movement; course; tendency; as, the motion of the planets is from west to east.

‘In our proper motion we ascend.’;

Resolutionnoun

The state of being resolved, settled, or determined; firmness; steadiness; constancy; determination.

‘Be it with resolution then to fight.’;

Motionnoun

Change in the relative position of the parts of anything; action of a machine with respect to the relative movement of its parts.

‘This is the great wheel to which the clock owes its motion.’;

Resolutionnoun

That which is resolved or determined; a settled purpose; determination. Specifically: A formal expression of the opinion or will of an official body or a public assembly, adopted by vote; as, a legislative resolution; the resolutions of a public meeting.

Motionnoun

Movement of the mind, desires, or passions; mental act, or impulse to any action; internal activity.

‘Let a good man obey every good motion rising in his heart, knowing that every such motion proceeds from God.’;

Resolutionnoun

The state of being resolved or firm in opinion or thought; conviction; assurance.

‘Little resolution and certainty there is as touching the islands of Mauritania.’;

Motionnoun

A proposal or suggestion looking to action or progress; esp., a formal proposal made in a deliberative assembly; as, a motion to adjourn.

‘Yes, I agree, and thank you for your motion.’;

Resolutionnoun

The act or process of solving; solution; as, the resolution of an equation or problem.

Motionnoun

An application made to a court or judge orally in open court. Its object is to obtain an order or rule directing some act to be done in favor of the applicant.

Resolutionnoun

A breaking up, disappearance; or termination, as of a fever, a tumor, or the like.

Motionnoun

Change of pitch in successive sounds, whether in the same part or in groups of parts.

‘The independent motions of different parts sounding together constitute counterpoint.’;

Resolutionnoun

The passing of a dissonant into a consonant chord by the rising or falling of the note which makes the discord.

Motionnoun

A puppet show or puppet.

‘What motion's this? the model of Nineveh?’;

Resolutionnoun

The act of distinguishing between two close but not identical objects, or, when taking a measurement, bbetween two close values of the property measured.

Motionverb

To make a significant movement or gesture, as with the hand; as, to motion to one to take a seat.

Resolutionnoun

a measure of the ability to distinguish between two close but not identical values of the property being measured; it is expressed as the difference in values of a property necessary to make such a distinction; as, a microscope with a resolution of one micron; a thermometer with a resolution of one-tenth of a degree. Also called resolving power.

Motionverb

To make proposal; to offer plans.

Resolutionnoun

a formal expression by a meeting; agreed to by a vote

Motionverb

To direct or invite by a motion, as of the hand or head; as, to motion one to a seat.

Resolutionnoun

the ability of a microscope or telescope to measure the angular separation of images that are close together

Motionverb

To propose; to move.

‘I want friends to motion such a matter.’;

Resolutionnoun

the trait of being resolute; firmness of purpose;

‘his resoluteness carried him through the battle’; ‘it was his unshakeable resolution to finish the work’;

Motionnoun

a natural event that involves a change in the position or location of something

Resolutionnoun

finding a solution to a problem

Motionnoun

the use of movements (especially of the hands) to communicate familiar or prearranged signals

Resolutionnoun

something settled or resolved; the outcome of decision making;

‘the finally reached a settlement with the union’; ‘they never did achieve a final resolution of their differences’; ‘he needed to grieve before he could achieve a sense of closure’;

Motionnoun

a change of position that does not entail a change of location;

‘the reflex motion of his eyebrows revealed his surprise’; ‘movement is a sign of life’; ‘an impatient move of his hand’; ‘gastrointestinal motility’;

Resolutionnoun

analysis into clear-cut components

Motionnoun

a state of change;

‘they were in a state of steady motion’;

Resolutionnoun

(computer science) the number of pixels per square inch on a computer-generated display; the greater the resolution, the better the picture

Motionnoun

a formal proposal for action made to a deliberative assembly for discussion and vote;

‘he made a motion to adjourn’; ‘she called for the question’;

Resolutionnoun

the subsidence of swelling or others signs of inflammation (especially in a lung)

Motionnoun

the act of changing location from one place to another;

‘police controlled the motion of the crowd’; ‘the movement of people from the farms to the cities’; ‘his move put him directly in my path’;

Resolutionnoun

(music) a dissonant chord is followed by a consonant chord

Motionnoun

an optical illusion of motion produced by viewing a rapid succession of still pictures of a moving object;

‘the cinema relies on apparent motion’; ‘the succession of flashing lights gave an illusion of movement’;

Resolutionnoun

a statement that solves a problem or explains how to solve the problem;

‘they were trying to find a peaceful solution’; ‘the answers were in the back of the book’; ‘he computed the result to four decimal places’;

Motionverb

show, express or direct through movement;

‘He gestured his desire to leave’;

Resolutionnoun

a decision to do something or to behave in a certain manner;

‘he always wrote down his New Year's resolutions’;

Motionnoun

the action or process of moving or being moved

‘a cushioned shoe that doesn't restrict motion’; ‘the laws of planetary motion’;

Resolutionnoun

a firm decision to do or not to do something

‘she kept her resolution not to see Anne any more’; ‘a New Year's resolution’;

Motionnoun

a gesture

‘she made a motion with her free hand’;

Resolutionnoun

a formal expression of opinion or intention agreed on by a legislative body or other formal meeting, typically after taking a vote

‘the conference passed two resolutions’;

Motionnoun

a piece of moving mechanism

‘the earliest engines had the Gresley conjugated motion for the middle cylinder’;

Resolutionnoun

the quality of being determined or resolute

‘he handled the last British actions of the war with resolution’;

Motionnoun

a formal proposal put to a legislature or committee

‘opposition parties tabled a no-confidence motion’;

Resolutionnoun

the action of solving a problem or contentious matter

‘a successful resolution to the problem’; ‘the peaceful resolution of all disputes’;

Motionnoun

an application for a rule or order of court

‘often the defendant contributes to the length of proceedings by filing many procedural motions’;

Resolutionnoun

the passing of a discord into a concord during the course of changing harmony

‘tension is released by the resolution from the dominant to the tonic chord’;

Motionnoun

an evacuation of the bowels

‘73% of the patients had fewer than three bowel motions a day’; ‘her mother put on her nappy for her to pass a motion’;

Resolutionnoun

the disappearance of a symptom or condition

‘complete remission was defined as resolution of clinical evidence of disease’;

Motionverb

direct or command (someone) with a movement of the hand or head

‘he motioned Dennis to a plush chair’; ‘he motioned the young officer to sit down’;

Resolutionnoun

the process of reducing or separating something into constituent parts or components.

Motionverb

propose for discussion and resolution at a meeting or legislative assembly

‘a resolution, motioned by Adam Tyler, proposed that members without a CCL could still belong to the association’; ‘Councillor Byrne motioned that the committee call on the area manager to install street lighting’;

Resolutionnoun

the replacing of a single force or other vector quantity by two or more jointly equivalent to it.

Motion

In physics, motion is the phenomenon in which an object changes its position over time. Motion is mathematically described in terms of displacement, distance, velocity, acceleration, speed, and time.

Resolutionnoun

the smallest interval measurable by a telescope or other scientific instrument; the resolving power.

Resolutionnoun

the degree of detail visible in a photographic or television image

‘a high-resolution monitor’;

Resolutionnoun

the conversion of something abstract into another form

‘the gradual resolution of an uncertain feeling into a named emotion’;

Resolutionnoun

the substitution of two short syllables for one long one.

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