VS.

Miss vs. Skip

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Missverb

(ambitransitive) To fail to hit.

‘I missed the target.’; ‘I tried to kick the ball, but missed.’;

Skipverb

(intransitive) To move by hopping on alternate feet.

‘She will skip from one end of the sidewalk to the other.’;

Missverb

(transitive) To fail to achieve or attain.

‘to miss an opportunity’;

Skipverb

(intransitive) To leap about lightly.

Missverb

(transitive) To feel the absence of someone or something, sometimes with regret.

‘I miss you! Come home soon!’;

Skipverb

(intransitive) To skim, ricochet or bounce over a surface.

‘The rock will skip across the pond.’;

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Missverb

(transitive) To fail to understand or have a shortcoming of perception.

‘miss the joke’;

Skipverb

(transitive) To throw (something), making it skim, ricochet, or bounce over a surface.

‘I bet I can skip this rock to the other side of the pond.’;

Missverb

(transitive) To fail to attend.

‘Joe missed the meeting this morning.’;

Skipverb

(transitive) To disregard, miss or omit part of a continuation (some item or stage).

‘My heart will skip a beat.’; ‘I will read most of the book, but skip the first chapter because the video covered it.’;

Missverb

(transitive) To be late for something (a means of transportation, a deadline, etc.).

‘I missed the plane!’;

Skipverb

To place an item in a skip.

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Missverb

(only in present tense) To be wanting; to lack something that should be present. transivity?

‘The car is missing essential features.’;

Skipverb

Not to attend (some event, especially a class or a meeting).

‘Yeah, I really should go to the quarterly meeting but I think I'm going to skip it.’;

Missverb

To fail to help the hand of a player.

‘Player A: J7. Player B: Q6. Table: 283. The flop missed both players!’;

Skipverb

To leave

‘to skip the country’;

Missverb

(sports) To fail to score (a goal).

Skipverb

To leap lightly over.

‘to skip the rope’;

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Missverb

To go wrong; to err.

Skipverb

To jump rope.

‘The girls were skipping in the playground.’;

Missverb

To be absent, deficient, or wanting.

Skipnoun

A leaping, jumping or skipping movement.

Missnoun

A failure to hit.

Skipnoun

The act of passing over an interval from one thing to another; an omission of a part.

Missnoun

A failure to obtain or accomplish.

Skipnoun

(music) A passage from one sound to another by more than a degree at once.

Missnoun

An act of avoidance (used with the verb give).

‘I think I’ll give the meeting a miss.’;

Skipnoun

A person who attempts to disappear so as not to be found.

Missnoun

(computing) The situation where an item is not found in a cache and therefore needs to be explicitly loaded.

Skipnoun

(radio) skywave propagation

Missnoun

A title of respect for a young woman (usually unmarried) with or without a name used.

‘You may sit here, miss.’; ‘You may sit here, Miss Jones.’;

Skipnoun

A basket. See Skep.

Missnoun

An unmarried woman; a girl.

Skipnoun

A basket on wheels, used in cotton factories.

Missnoun

A kept woman; a mistress.

Skipnoun

An iron bucket, which slides between guides, for hoisting mineral and rock.

Missnoun

(card games) In the game of three-card loo, an extra hand, dealt on the table, which may be substituted for the hand dealt to a player.

Skipnoun

A charge of sirup in the pans.

Missnoun

A title of courtesy prefixed to the name of a girl or a woman who has not been married. See Mistress, 5.

Skipnoun

A beehive; a skep.

Missnoun

A young unmarried woman or a girl; as, she is a miss of sixteen.

‘Gay vanity, with smiles and kisses,Was busy 'mongst the maids and misses.’;

Skipnoun

A light leap or bound.

Missnoun

A kept mistress. See Mistress, 4.

Skipnoun

The act of passing over an interval from one thing to another; an omission of a part.

Missnoun

In the game of three-card loo, an extra hand, dealt on the table, which may be substituted for the hand dealt to a player.

Skipnoun

A passage from one sound to another by more than a degree at once.

Missnoun

The act of missing; failure to hit, reach, find, obtain, etc.

Skipverb

To leap lightly; to move in leaps and hounds; - commonly implying a sportive spirit.

‘The lamb thy riot dooms to bleed to-day,Had he thy reason, would he skip and play?’; ‘So she drew her mother away skipping, dancing, and frisking fantastically.’;

Missnoun

Loss; want; felt absence.

‘There will be no great miss of those which are lost.’;

Skipverb

Fig.: To leave matters unnoticed, as in reading, speaking, or writing; to pass by, or overlook, portions of a thing; - often followed by over.

Missnoun

Mistake; error; fault.

‘He did without any great miss in the hardest points of grammar.’;

Skipverb

To leap lightly over; as, to skip the rope.

Missnoun

Harm from mistake.

Skipverb

To pass over or by without notice; to omit; to miss; as, to skip a line in reading; to skip a lesson.

‘They who have a mind to see the issue may skip these two chapters.’;

Missverb

To fail of hitting, reaching, getting, finding, seeing, hearing, etc.; as, to miss the mark one shoots at; to miss the train by being late; to miss opportunites of getting knowledge; to miss the point or meaning of something said.

‘When a man misses his great end, happiness, he will acknowledge he judged not right.’;

Skipverb

To cause to skip; as, to skip a stone.

Missverb

To omit; to fail to have or to do; to get without; to dispense with; - now seldom applied to persons.

‘She would never miss, one day,A walk so fine, a sight so gay.’; ‘We cannot miss him; he does make our fire,Fetch in our wood.’;

Skipnoun

a gait in which steps and hops alternate

Missverb

To discover the absence or omission of; to feel the want of; to mourn the loss of; to want; as, to miss an absent loved one.

‘Neither missed we anything . . . Nothing was missed of all that pertained unto him.’; ‘What by me thou hast lost, thou least shalt miss.’;

Skipnoun

a mistake resulting from neglect

Missverb

To fail to hit; to fly wide; to deviate from the true direction.

‘Men observe when things hit, and not when they miss.’; ‘Flying bullets now,To execute his rage, appear too slow;They miss, or sweep but common souls away.’;

Skipverb

bypass;

‘He skipped a row in the text and so the sentence was incomprehensible’;

Missverb

To fail to obtain, learn, or find; - with of.

‘Upon the least reflection, we can not miss of them.’;

Skipverb

intentionally fail to attend;

‘cut class’;

Missverb

To go wrong; to err.

‘Amongst the angels, a whole legionOf wicked sprites did fall from happy bliss;What wonder then if one, of women all, did miss?’;

Skipverb

jump lightly

Missverb

To be absent, deficient, or wanting.

‘What here shall miss, our toil shall strive to mend.’;

Skipverb

leave suddenly;

‘She persuaded him to decamp’; ‘skip town’;

Missnoun

a young woman;

‘a young lady of 18’;

Skipverb

bound off one point after another

Missnoun

a failure to hit (or meet or find etc)

Skipverb

cause to skip over a surface;

‘Skip a stone across the pond’;

Missverb

fail to perceive or to catch with the senses or the mind;

‘I missed that remark’; ‘She missed his point’; ‘We lost part of what he said’;

Skipverb

move along lightly, stepping from one foot to the other with a hop or bounce

‘she began to skip down the path’;

Missverb

feel or suffer from the lack of;

‘He misses his mother’;

Skipverb

jump over a rope which is held at both ends by oneself or two other people and turned repeatedly over the head and under the feet, as a game or for exercise

‘training was centred on running and skipping’;

Missverb

fail to attend an event or activity;

‘I missed the concert’; ‘He missed school for a week’;

Skipverb

jump over (a rope that is being turned)

‘the younger girls had been skipping rope’;

Missverb

leave undone or leave out;

‘How could I miss that typo?’; ‘The workers on the conveyor belt miss one out of ten’;

Skipverb

jump lightly over

‘the children used to skip the puddles’;

Missverb

fail to reach or get to;

‘She missed her train’;

Skipverb

omit (part of a book that one is reading, or a stage in a sequence that one is following)

‘the video manual allows the viewer to skip sections he's not interested in’;

Missverb

be without;

‘This soup lacks salt’; ‘There is something missing in my jewellery box!’;

Skipverb

move quickly and in an unmethodical way from one point or subject to another

‘Marian skipped half-heartedly through the book’;

Missverb

fail to reach;

‘The arrow missed the target’;

Skipverb

fail to attend or deal with as appropriate; miss

‘try not to skip breakfast’; ‘I wanted to skip my English lesson to visit my mother’;

Missverb

be absent;

‘The child had been missing for a week’;

Skipverb

abandon an undertaking, conversation, or activity

‘after several wrong turns in our journey, we almost decided to skip it’;

Missverb

fail to experience;

‘Fortunately, I missed the hurricane’;

Skipverb

run away; disappear

‘I'm not giving them a chance to skip off again’;

Miss

Miss (pronounced ) is an English language honorific traditionally used only for an unmarried woman (not using another title such as or ). Originating in the 17th century, it is a contraction of mistress, which was used for all women.

‘Doctor’; ‘Dame’;

Skipverb

depart quickly and secretly from

‘she skipped her home amid rumours of a romance’;

Skipverb

throw (a stone) so that it ricochets off the surface of water

‘they skipped stones across the creek’;

Skipverb

act as skip of (a side)

‘they lost to another Stranraer team, skipped by Peter Wilson’;

Skipnoun

a light, bouncing step; a skipping movement

‘he moved with a strange, dancing skip’;

Skipnoun

an act of passing over part of a sequence of data or instructions.

Skipnoun

a person who is missing, especially one who has defaulted on a debt.

Skipnoun

a large transportable open-topped container for building and other refuse

‘I've salvaged a carpet from a skip’;

Skipnoun

a cage or bucket in which men or materials are lowered and raised in mines and quarries.

Skipnoun

variant spelling of skep

Skipnoun

the captain or director of a side at bowls or curling.

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