VS.

Hop vs. Leap

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Hopnoun

A short jump.

‘The frog crossed the brook in three or four hops.’;

Leapverb

(intransitive) To jump.

Hopnoun

A jump on one leg.

Leapverb

(transitive) To pass over by a leap or jump.

‘to leap a wall or a ditch’;

Hopnoun

A short journey, especially in the case of air travel, one that take place on private plane.

Leapverb

(transitive) To copulate with (a female beast); to cover.

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Hopnoun

A bounce, especially from the ground, of a thrown or batted ball.

Leapverb

(transitive) To cause to leap.

‘to leap a horse across a ditch’;

Hopnoun

A dance.

Leapnoun

The act of leaping or jumping.

Hopnoun

(networking) The sending of a data packet from one host to another as part of its overall journey.

Leapnoun

The distance traversed by a leap or jump.

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Hopnoun

The plant (Humulus lupulus) from whose flowers, beer or ale is brewed.

Leapnoun

A group of leopards.

Hopnoun

The flowers of the hop plant, dried and used to brew beer etc.

Leapnoun

(figuratively) A significant move forward.

Hopnoun

Opium, or some other narcotic drug.

Leapnoun

(figuratively) A large step in reasoning, often one that is not justified by the facts.

‘It's quite a leap to claim that those cloud formations are evidence of UFOs.’;

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Hopnoun

The fruit of the dog rose; a hip.

Leapnoun

(mining) A fault.

Hopverb

(intransitive) To jump a short distance.

Leapnoun

Copulation with, or coverture of, a female beast.

Hopverb

(intransitive) To jump on one foot.

Leapnoun

(music) A passing from one note to another by an interval, especially by a long one, or by one including several other intermediate intervals.

Hopverb

(intransitive) To be in state of energetic activity.

‘Sorry, can't chat. Got to hop.’; ‘The sudden rush of customers had everyone in the shop hopping.’;

Leapnoun

(calendar) Intercalary, bissextile.

Hopverb

(transitive) To suddenly take a mode of transportation that one does not drive oneself, often surreptitiously.

‘I hopped a plane over here as soon as I heard the news.’; ‘He was trying to hop a ride in an empty trailer headed north.’; ‘He hopped a train to California.’;

Leapnoun

(obsolete) A basket.

Hopverb

(transitive) To jump onto, or over

Leapnoun

A trap or snare for fish, made from twigs; a weely.

Hopverb

To move frequently from one place or situation to another similar one.

‘We were party-hopping all weekend.’; ‘We had to island hop on the weekly seaplane to get to his hideaway.’;

Leapnoun

Half a bushel.

Hopverb

(obsolete) To walk lame; to limp.

Leapnoun

A basket.

Hopverb

To dance.

Leapnoun

A weel or wicker trap for fish.

Hopverb

(transitive) To impregnate with hops, especially to add hops as a flavouring agent during the production of beer

Leapnoun

The act of leaping, or the space passed by leaping; a jump; a spring; a bound.

‘Wickedness comes on by degrees, . . . and sudden leaps from one extreme to another are unnatural.’; ‘Changes of tone may proceed either by leaps or glides.’;

Hopverb

(intransitive) To gather hops.

Leapnoun

Copulation with, or coverture of, a female beast.

Hopverb

To move by successive leaps, as toads do; to spring or jump on one foot; to skip, as birds do.

‘[Birds] hopping from spray to spray.’;

Leapnoun

A fault.

Hopverb

To walk lame; to limp; to halt.

Leapnoun

A passing from one note to another by an interval, especially by a long one, or by one including several other and intermediate intervals.

Hopverb

To dance.

Leapverb

To spring clear of the ground, with the feet; to jump; to vault; as, a man leaps over a fence, or leaps upon a horse.

‘Leap in with me into this angry flood.’;

Hopverb

To impregnate with hops.

Leapverb

To spring or move suddenly, as by a jump or by jumps; to bound; to move swiftly. Also Fig.

‘My heart leaps up when I beholdA rainbow in the sky.’;

Hopverb

To gather hops. [Perhaps only in the form Hopping, vb. n.]

Leapverb

To pass over by a leap or jump; as, to leap a wall, or a ditch.

Hopnoun

A leap on one leg, as of a boy; a leap, as of a toad; a jump; a spring.

Leapverb

To copulate with (a female beast); to cover.

Hopnoun

A dance; esp., an informal dance of ball.

Leapverb

To cause to leap; as, to leap a horse across a ditch.

Hopnoun

A climbing plant (Humulus Lupulus), having a long, twining, annual stalk. It is cultivated for its fruit (hops).

Leapnoun

a light springing movement upwards or forwards

Hopnoun

The catkin or strobilaceous fruit of the hop, much used in brewing to give a bitter taste.

Leapnoun

an abrupt transition;

‘a successful leap from college to the major leagues’;

Hopnoun

The fruit of the dog-rose. See Hip.

Leapnoun

a sudden and decisive increase;

‘a jump in attendance’;

Hopnoun

the act of hopping; jumping upward or forward (especially on one foot)

Leapnoun

the distance leaped (or to be leaped);

‘a leap of 10 feet’;

Hopnoun

twining perennials having cordate leaves and flowers arranged in conelike spikes; the dried flowers of this plant are used in brewing to add the characteristic bitter taste to beer

Leapverb

move forward by leaps and bounds;

‘The horse bounded across the meadow’; ‘The child leapt across the puddle’; ‘Can you jump over the fence?’;

Hopnoun

an informal dance where popular music is played

Leapverb

pass abruptly from one state or topic to another;

‘leap into fame’; ‘jump to a conclusion’;

Hopverb

jump lightly

Leapverb

cause to jump or leap;

‘the trainer jumped the tiger through the hoop’;

Hopverb

move quickly from one place to another

Leapverb

jump or spring a long way, to a great height, or with great force

‘Fabia's heart leapt excitedly’; ‘he leapt on to the parapet’;

Hopverb

informal: travel by means of an aircraft, bus, etc.;

‘She hopped a train to Chicago’; ‘He hopped rides all over the country’;

Leapverb

jump across

‘Peter leapt the last few stairs’;

Hopverb

make a quick trip especially by air;

‘Hop the Pacific Ocean’;

Leapverb

move quickly and suddenly

‘Polly leapt to her feet’;

Hopverb

jump across;

‘He hopped the bush’;

Leapverb

make a sudden rush to do something; act eagerly and suddenly

‘everybody leapt into action’;

Hopverb

make a jump forward or upward

Leapverb

accept (an opportunity) eagerly

‘they leapt at the opportunity to combine fun with fund-raising’;

Leapverb

(of a price, amount, etc.) increase dramatically

‘sales leapt by a third last year’;

Leapverb

(especially of writing) be conspicuous; stand out

‘amid the notes, a couple of items leap out’;

Leapnoun

a forceful jump or quick movement

‘she came downstairs in a series of flying leaps’;

Leapnoun

a dramatic increase in price, amount, etc.

‘a leap of 75 per cent in two years’;

Leapnoun

a sudden abrupt change or transition

‘it doesn't take a great leap of imagination to recognize that you have held an important leadership role’;

Leapnoun

a thing to be leaped over or from

‘Lover's Leap’;

Leapnoun

a group of leopards

‘we stopped to photograph a leap of leopards’;

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