VS.

Indolence vs. Laziness

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Indolencenoun

Habitual laziness or sloth.

Lazinessnoun

The quality of being lazy

Indolencenoun

Freedom from that which pains, or harasses, as toil, care, grief, etc.

‘I have ease, if it may not rather be called indolence.’;

Lazinessnoun

The state or quality of being lazy.

‘Laziness travels so slowly, that Poverty soon overtakes him.’;

Indolencenoun

The quality or condition of being indolent; inaction, or lack of exertion of body or mind, proceeding from love of ease or aversion to toil; habitual idleness; indisposition to labor; laziness; sloth; inactivity.

‘Life spent in indolence, and therefore sad.’; ‘As there is a great truth wrapped up in "diligence," what a lie, on the other hand, lurks at the root of our present use of the word "indolence"! This is from "in" and "doleo," not to grieve; and indolence is thus a state in which we have no grief or pain; so that the word, as we now employ it, seems to affirm that indulgence in sloth and ease is that which would constitute for us the absence of all pain.’;

Lazinessnoun

inactivity resulting from a dislike of work

Indolencenoun

inactivity resulting from a dislike of work

Lazinessnoun

apathy and inactivity in the practice of virtue (personified as one of the deadly sins)

Laziness

Laziness (also known as indolence) is disinclination to activity or exertion despite having the ability to act or to exert oneself. It is often used as a pejorative; terms for a person seen to be lazy include , , and .

‘couch potato’; ‘slacker’; ‘bludger’;

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