VS.

Gale vs. Hurricane

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Galeverb

To sing; charm; enchant.

Hurricanenoun

A severe tropical cyclone in the North Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico, or in the eastern North Pacific off the west coast of Mexico, with winds of 119 km/h (74 miles per hour) or greater accompanied by rain, lightning, and thunder that sometimes moves into temperate latitudes.

Galeverb

To cry; groan; croak.

Hurricanenoun

(meteorology) a wind scale for quite strong wind, stronger than a storm

Galeverb

To talk.

Hurricanenoun

"full—triple-full—full" – an acrobatic maneuver consisting of three flips and five twists, with one twist on the first flip, three twists on the second flip, one twist on the third flip

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Galeverb

To call.

Hurricanenoun

A violent storm, characterized by extreme fury and sudden changes of the wind, and generally accompanied by rain, thunder, and lightning; - especially prevalent in the East and West Indies. Also used figuratively.

‘Like the smoke in a hurricane whirl'd.’; ‘Each guilty thought to me isA dreadful hurricane.’;

Galeverb

To sing; utter with musical modulations.

Hurricanenoun

a severe tropical cyclone usually with heavy rains and winds moving a 73-136 knots (12 on the Beaufort scale)

Galeverb

(nautical) To sail, or sail fast.

Galenoun

(meteorology) A very strong wind, more than a breeze, less than a storm; number 7 through to 9 winds on the 12-step Beaufort scale.

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Galenoun

An outburst, especially of laughter.

‘a gale of laughter’;

Galenoun

(archaic) A light breeze.

Galenoun

(obsolete) A song or story.

Galenoun

A shrub, also called sweet gale or bog myrtle (Myrica gale), that grows on moors and fens.

Galenoun

(archaic) A periodic payment, such as is made of a rent or annuity.

‘Gale day - the day on which rent or interest is due.’;

Galenoun

A strong current of air; a wind between a stiff breeze and a hurricane. The most violent gales are called tempests.

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Galenoun

A moderate current of air; a breeze.

‘A little gale will soon disperse that cloud.’; ‘And winds of gentlest gale Arabian odors fannedFrom their soft wings.’;

Galenoun

A state of excitement, passion, or hilarity.

‘The ladies, laughing heartily, were fast getting into what, in New England, is sometimes called a gale.’;

Galenoun

A song or story.

Galenoun

A plant of the genus Myrica, growing in wet places, and strongly resembling the bayberry. The sweet gale (Myrica Gale) is found both in Europe and in America.

Galenoun

The payment of a rent or annuity.

Galeverb

To sale, or sail fast.

Galeverb

To sing.

Galenoun

a strong wind moving 45-90 knots; force 7 to 10 on Beaufort scale

Gale

A gale is a strong wind, typically used as a descriptor in nautical contexts. The U.S. National Weather Service defines a gale as 34–47 knots (63–87 km/h, 17.5–24.2 m/s or 39–54 miles/hour) of sustained surface winds.

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