VS.

Heritage vs. Descent

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Heritagenoun

An inheritance; property that may be inherited.

Descentnoun

An instance of descending; act of coming down.

‘We climbed the mountain with difficulty, but the descent was easier.’;

Heritagenoun

A tradition; a practice or set of values that is passed down from preceding generations through families or through institutional memory.

Descentnoun

A way down.

‘We had difficulty in finding the correct descent.’;

Heritagenoun

A birthright; the status acquired by birth, especially of but not exclusive to the firstborn.

Descentnoun

A sloping passage or incline.

‘The descent into the cavern was wet and slippery.’;

Heritagenoun

(attributive) Having a certain background, such as growing up with a second language.

‘The university requires heritage Spanish students to enroll in a specially designed Spanish program not available to non-heritage students.’;

Descentnoun

Lineage or hereditary derivation.

‘Our guide was of Welsh descent.’;

Heritageadjective

That which is inherited, or passes from heir to heir; inheritance.

‘Part of my heritage,Which my dead father did bequeath to me.’;

Descentnoun

A drop to a lower status or condition; decline. en

‘After that, the holiday went into a steep descent.’;

Heritageadjective

A possession; the Israelites, as God's chosen people; also, a flock under pastoral charge.

Descentnoun

A falling upon or invasion.

Heritagenoun

practices that are handed down from the past by tradition;

‘a heritage of freedom’;

Descentnoun

(topology) A particular extension of the idea of gluing. See Descent (mathematics).

Heritagenoun

any attribute or immaterial possession that is inherited from ancestors;

‘my only inheritance was my mother's blessing’; ‘the world's heritage of knowledge’;

Descentnoun

The act of descending, or passing downward; change of place from higher to lower.

Heritagenoun

that which is inherited; a title or property or estate that passes by law to the heir on the death of the owner

Descentnoun

Incursion; sudden attack; especially, hostile invasion from sea; - often followed by upon or on; as, to make a descent upon the enemy.

‘The United Provinces . . . ordered public prayer to God, when they feared that the French and English fleets would make a descent upon their coasts.’;

Heritagenoun

hereditary succession to a title or an office or property

Descentnoun

Derivation, as from an ancestor; procedure by generation; lineage; birth; extraction.

Heritagenoun

property that is or may be inherited; an inheritance

‘they had stolen his grandfather's heritage’;

Descentnoun

Progress downward, as in station, virtue, as in station, virtue, and the like, from a higher to a lower state, from a higher to a lower state, from the more to the less important, from the better to the worse, etc.

Heritagenoun

valued objects and qualities such as historic buildings and cultural traditions that have been passed down from previous generations

‘the estuary has a sense of history and heritage’; ‘Europe's varied cultural heritage’;

Descentnoun

Transmission of an estate by inheritance, usually, but not necessarily, in the descending line; title to inherit an estate by reason of consanguinity.

Heritagenoun

denoting or relating to things of special architectural, historical, or natural value that are preserved for the nation

‘a heritage centre’; ‘60 miles of heritage coastline’;

Descentnoun

Inclination downward; a descending way; inclined or sloping surface; declivity; slope; as, a steep descent.

Heritagenoun

denoting a traditional brand or product regarded as emblematic of fine craftsmanship

‘heritage brands have found a growing cachet among younger customers’;

Descentnoun

That which is descended; descendants; issue.

‘If care of our descent perplex us most,Which must be born to certain woe.’;

Heritagenoun

denoting a breed of livestock or poultry that was once traditional to an area but is no longer farmed in large numbers

‘Cotswold sheep are considered a heritage breed in Canada’;

Descentnoun

A step or remove downward in any scale of gradation; a degree in the scale of genealogy; a generation.

‘No man living is a thousand descents removed from Adam himself.’;

Heritagenoun

(of a plant variety) not hybridized with another; old-fashioned

‘heritage roses’;

Descentnoun

Lowest place; extreme downward place.

‘And from the extremest upward of thy head,To the descent and dust below thy foot.’;

Heritagenoun

a special or individual possession; an allotted portion

‘God's love remains your heritage’;

Descentnoun

a movement downward

Heritagenoun

Christians, or the ancient Israelites, seen as God's chosen people.

Descentnoun

properties attributable to your ancestry;

‘he comes from good origins’;

Descentnoun

the act of changing your location in a downward direction

Descentnoun

the kinship relation between an individual and the individual's progenitors

Descentnoun

a downward slope or bend

Descentnoun

the descendants of one individual;

‘his entire lineage has been warriors’;

Descentnoun

an act of moving downwards, dropping, or falling

‘the plane had gone into a steep descent’;

Descentnoun

a downward slope

‘a steep, badly eroded descent’;

Descentnoun

a moral, social, or psychological decline

‘the ancient empire's slow descent into barbarism’;

Descentnoun

the origin or background of a person in terms of family or nationality

‘the settlers were of Cornish descent’;

Descentnoun

the transmission of qualities, property, or privileges by inheritance.

Descentnoun

a sudden violent attack

‘a descent on the Channel ports’;

Descentnoun

an unexpected visit

‘his descents on the manager of any shop he took a fancy to visit’;

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