VS.

Force vs. Impel

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Forcenoun

Strength or energy of body or mind; active power; vigour; might; capacity of exercising an influence or producing an effect.

‘the force of an appeal, an argument, or a contract’;

Impelverb

(transitive) To urge a person; to press on; to incite to action or motion via intrinsic motivation (contrast with propel, to compel or drive extrinsically).

Forcenoun

Power exerted against will or consent; compulsory power; violence; coercion.

Impelverb

(transitive) To drive forward; to propel an object.

Forcenoun

(countable) Anything that is able to make a big change in a person or thing.

Impelverb

To drive or urge forward or on; to press on; to incite to action or motion in any way.

‘The surge impelled me on a craggy coast.’;

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Forcenoun

A physical quantity that denotes ability to push, pull, twist or accelerate a body and which has a direction and is measured in a unit dimensioned in mass × distance/time² (ML/T²): SI: newton (N); CGS: dyne (dyn)

Impelverb

urge or force (a person) to an action; constrain or motivate

Forcenoun

Something or anything that has the power to produce a physical effect upon something else, such as causing it to move or change shape.

Impelverb

cause to move forward with force;

‘Steam propels this ship’;

Forcenoun

(countable) A group that aims to attack, control, or constrain.

‘police force’;

Forcenoun

(uncountable) The ability to attack, control, or constrain.

‘show of force’;

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Forcenoun

(countable) A magic trick in which the outcome is known to the magician beforehand, especially one involving the apparent free choice of a card by another person.

Forcenoun

(legal) Legal validity.

‘The law will come into force in January.’;

Forcenoun

(legal) Either unlawful violence, as in a "forced entry", or lawful compulsion.

Forcenoun

Ability of an utterance or its element (word, form, prosody, ...) to effect a given meaning.

Forcenoun

(science fiction) A binding, metaphysical, and ubiquitous power in the fictional Star Wars universe created by George Lucas.

Forcenoun

A waterfall or cascade.

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Forceverb

(transitive) To violate (a woman); to rape.

Forceverb

To exert oneself, to do one's utmost.

Forceverb

(transitive) To compel (someone or something) to do something.

Forceverb

(transitive) To constrain by force; to overcome the limitations or resistance of.

Forceverb

(transitive) To drive (something) by force, to propel (generally + prepositional phrase or adverb).

Forceverb

(transitive) To cause to occur (despite inertia, resistance etc.); to produce through force.

‘The comedian's jokes weren't funny, but I forced a laugh now and then.’;

Forceverb

(transitive) To forcibly open (a door, lock etc.).

‘To force a lock.’;

Forceverb

To obtain or win by strength; to take by violence or struggle; specifically, to capture by assault; to storm, as a fortress.

Forceverb

To create an out by touching a base in advance of a runner who has no base to return to while in possession of a ball which has already touched the ground.

‘Jones forced the runner at second by stepping on the bag.’;

Forceverb

(whist) To compel (an adversary or partner) to trump a trick by leading a suit that he/she does not hold.

Forceverb

(archaic) To put in force; to cause to be executed; to make binding; to enforce.

Forceverb

(archaic) To provide with forces; to reinforce; to strengthen by soldiers; to man; to garrison.

Forceverb

(obsolete) To allow the force of; to value; to care for.

Forceverb

To stuff; to lard; to farce.

Forceverb

To stuff; to lard; to farce.

‘Wit larded with malice, and malice forced with wit.’;

Forceverb

To constrain to do or to forbear, by the exertion of a power not resistible; to compel by physical, moral, or intellectual means; to coerce; as, masters force slaves to labor.

Forceverb

To compel, as by strength of evidence; as, to force conviction on the mind.

Forceverb

To do violence to; to overpower, or to compel by violence to one's will; especially, to ravish; to violate; to commit rape upon.

‘To force their monarch and insult the court.’; ‘I should have forced thee soon wish other arms.’; ‘To force a spotless virgin's chastity.’;

Forceverb

To obtain, overcome, or win by strength; to take by violence or struggle; specifically, to capture by assault; to storm, as a fortress; as, to force the castle; to force a lock.

Forceverb

To impel, drive, wrest, extort, get, etc., by main strength or violence; - with a following adverb, as along, away, from, into, through, out, etc.

‘It stuck so fast, so deeply buried layThat scarce the victor forced the steel away.’; ‘To force the tyrant from his seat by war.’; ‘Ethelbert ordered that none should be forced into religion.’;

Forceverb

To put in force; to cause to be executed; to make binding; to enforce.

‘What can the church force more?’;

Forceverb

To exert to the utmost; to urge; hence, to strain; to urge to excessive, unnatural, or untimely action; to produce by unnatural effort; as, to force a conceit or metaphor; to force a laugh; to force fruits.

‘High on a mounting wave my head I bore,Forcing my strength, and gathering to the shore.’;

Forceverb

To compel (an adversary or partner) to trump a trick by leading a suit of which he has none.

Forceverb

To provide with forces; to reënforce; to strengthen by soldiers; to man; to garrison.

Forceverb

To allow the force of; to value; to care for.

‘For me, I force not argument a straw.’;

Forceverb

To use violence; to make violent effort; to strive; to endeavor.

‘Forcing with gifts to win his wanton heart.’;

Forceverb

To make a difficult matter of anything; to labor; to hesitate; hence, to force of, to make much account of; to regard.

‘Your oath once broke, you force not to forswear.’; ‘I force not of such fooleries.’;

Forceverb

To be of force, importance, or weight; to matter.

‘It is not sufficient to have attained the name and dignity of a shepherd, not forcing how.’;

Forcenoun

A waterfall; a cascade.

‘To see the falls for force of the river Kent.’;

Forcenoun

Capacity of exercising an influence or producing an effect; strength or energy of body or mind; active power; vigor; might; often, an unusual degree of strength or energy; especially, power to persuade, or convince, or impose obligation; pertinency; validity; special signification; as, the force of an appeal, an argument, a contract, or a term.

‘He was, in the full force of the words, a good man.’;

Forcenoun

Power exerted against will or consent; compulsory power; violence; coercion; as, by force of arms; to take by force.

‘Which now they hold by force, and not by right.’;

Forcenoun

Strength or power for war; hence, a body of land or naval combatants, with their appurtenances, ready for action; - an armament; troops; warlike array; - often in the plural; hence, a body of men prepared for action in other ways; as, the laboring force of a plantation; the armed forces.

‘Is Lucius general of the forces?’;

Forcenoun

Strength or power exercised without law, or contrary to law, upon persons or things; violence.

Forcenoun

Any action between two bodies which changes, or tends to change, their relative condition as to rest or motion; or, more generally, which changes, or tends to change, any physical relation between them, whether mechanical, thermal, chemical, electrical, magnetic, or of any other kind; as, the force of gravity; cohesive force; centrifugal force.

‘Thy tears are of no force to mollifyThis flinty man.’; ‘More huge in strength than wise in works he was.’; ‘Adam and first matron EveHad ended now their orisons, and foundStrength added from above, new hope to springOut of despair.’;

Forcenoun

a unit that is part of some military service;

‘he sent Caesar a force of six thousand men’;

Forcenoun

one possessing or exercising power or influence or authority;

‘the mysterious presence of an evil power’; ‘may the force be with you’; ‘the forces of evil’;

Forcenoun

(physics) the influence that produces a change in a physical quantity;

‘force equals mass times acceleration’;

Forcenoun

group of people willing to obey orders;

‘a public force is necessary to give security to the rights of citizens’;

Forcenoun

a powerful effect or influence;

‘the force of his eloquence easily persuaded them’;

Forcenoun

an act of aggression (as one against a person who resists);

‘he may accomplish by craft in the long run what he cannot do by force and violence in the short one’;

Forcenoun

physical energy or intensity;

‘he hit with all the force he could muster’; ‘it was destroyed by the strength of the gale’; ‘a government has not the vitality and forcefulness of a living man’;

Forcenoun

a group of people having the power of effective action;

‘he joined forces with a band of adventurers’;

Forcenoun

(of a law) having legal validity;

‘the law is still in effect’;

Forceverb

to cause to do through pressure or necessity, by physical, moral or intellectual means :

‘She forced him to take a job in the city’; ‘He squeezed her for information’;

Forceverb

urge or force (a person) to an action; constrain or motivate

Forceverb

move with force,

‘He pushed the table into a corner’;

Forceverb

impose or thrust urgently, importunately, or inexorably;

‘She forced her diet fads on him’;

Forceverb

squeeze like a wedge into a tight space;

‘I squeezed myself into the corner’;

Forceverb

force into or from an action or state, either physically or metaphorically;

‘She rammed her mind into focus’; ‘He drives me mad’;

Forceverb

do forcibly; exert force;

‘Don't force it!’;

Forceverb

cause to move along the ground by pulling;

‘draw a wagon’; ‘pull a sled’;

Forceverb

take by force;

‘Storm the fort’;

Forcenoun

strength or energy as an attribute of physical action or movement

‘he was thrown backwards by the force of the explosion’;

Forcenoun

an influence tending to change the motion of a body or produce motion or stress in a stationary body. The magnitude of such an influence is often calculated by multiplying the mass of the body and its acceleration.

Forcenoun

used with a number as a measure of wind strength on the Beaufort scale

‘a force-nine gale’;

Forcenoun

coercion or compulsion, especially with the use or threat of violence

‘they ruled by law and not by force’;

Forcenoun

mental or moral strength or power

‘the force of popular opinion’;

Forcenoun

a person or thing regarded as exerting power or influence

‘he might still be a force for peace and unity’;

Forcenoun

the powerful effect of something

‘the Committee accepted the force of this argument’;

Forcenoun

an organized body of military personnel or police

‘a British peacekeeping force’;

Forcenoun

troops and weaponry

‘a battle between the forces of good and evil’; ‘left-wing guerrilla forces’;

Forcenoun

the army, navy, and air force of a country.

Forcenoun

the police.

Forcenoun

a group of people brought together and organized for a particular activity

‘a sales force’;

Forcenoun

a waterfall.

Forceverb

make a way through or into by physical strength; break open by force

‘the back door of the bank was forced’;

Forceverb

drive or push into a specified position or state using physical strength or against resistance

‘thieves tried to force open the cash register’; ‘Mark forced her arms back above her head’;

Forceverb

achieve or bring about (something) by effort

‘Sabine forced a smile’; ‘they forced a way through the crowd’;

Forceverb

artificially hasten the development or maturity of (a plant).

Forceverb

make (someone) do something against their will

‘the universities were forced to cut staff’; ‘she was forced into early retirement’;

Forceverb

put out (a runner) by necessitating an advance to the next base when it is not possible to do so safely.

Force

In physics, a force is any influence that, when unopposed, will change the motion of an object. A force can cause an object with mass to change its velocity (which includes to begin moving from a state of rest), i.e., to accelerate.

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