VS.

Fetch vs. Catch

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Fetchverb

To retrieve; to bear towards; to go and get.

Catchnoun

(countable) The act of seizing or capturing. s

‘The catch of the perpetrator was the product of a year of police work.’;

Fetchverb

To obtain as price or equivalent; to sell for.

‘If you put some new tyres on it, and clean it up a bit, the car should fetch about $5,000’;

Catchnoun

(countable) The act of catching an object in motion, especially a ball. t

‘The player made an impressive catch.’; ‘Nice catch!’;

Fetchverb

(nautical) To bring or get within reach by going; to reach; to arrive at; to attain; to reach by sailing.

‘to fetch headway or sternway’;

Catchnoun

(countable) The act of noticing, understanding or hearing. t

‘Good catch. I never would have remembered that.’;

Fetchverb

(intransitive) To bring oneself; to make headway; to veer; as, to fetch about; to fetch to windward.

Catchnoun

(uncountable) The game of catching a ball. t

‘The kids love to play catch.’;

Fetchverb

To take (a breath), to heave (a sigh)

Catchnoun

(countable) A find, in particular a boyfriend or girlfriend or prospective spouse. t

‘Did you see his latest catch?’; ‘He's a good catch.’;

Fetchverb

To cause to come; to bring to a particular state.

Catchnoun

(countable) Something which is captured or caught. t s

‘The fishermen took pictures of their catch.’; ‘The catch amounted to five tons of swordfish.’;

Fetchverb

(obsolete) To recall from a swoon; to revive; sometimes with to.

‘to fetch a man to’;

Catchnoun

(countable) A stopping mechanism, especially a clasp which stops something from opening. t

‘She installed a sturdy catch to keep her cabinets closed tight.’;

Fetchverb

To reduce; to throw.

Catchnoun

(countable) A hesitation in voice, caused by strong emotion.

‘There was a catch in his voice when he spoke his father's name.’;

Fetchverb

To bring to accomplishment; to achieve; to make; to perform, with certain objects.

‘to fetch a compass;’; ‘to fetch a leap’;

Catchnoun

A concealed difficulty, especially in a deal or negotiation. t

‘It sounds like a great idea, but what's the catch?’; ‘Be careful, that's a catch question.’;

Fetchverb

To make (a pump) draw water by pouring water into the top and working the handle.

Catchnoun

(countable) A crick; a sudden muscle pain during unaccustomed positioning when the muscle is in use.

‘I bent over to see under the table and got a catch in my side.’;

Fetchnoun

The object of fetching; the source and origin of attraction; a force, quality or propensity which is attracting eg., in a given attribute of person, place, object, principle, etc.

Catchnoun

(countable) A fragment of music or poetry. s

Fetchnoun

A stratagem by which a thing is indirectly brought to pass, or by which one thing seems intended and another is done; a trick; an artifice.

Catchnoun

(obsolete) A state of readiness to capture or seize; an ambush.

Fetchnoun

(computing) The act of fetching data.

‘a fetch from a cache’;

Catchnoun

A crop which has germinated and begun to grow.

Fetchverb

To bear toward the person speaking, or the person or thing from whose point of view the action is contemplated; to go and bring; to get.

‘Time will run back and fetch the age of gold.’; ‘He called to her, and said, Fetch me, I pray thee, a little water in a vessel, that I may drink. And as she was going to fetch it he called to her, and said, Bring me, I pray thee, a morsel of bread in thine hand.’;

Catchnoun

(obsolete) A type of strong boat, usually having two masts; a ketch.

Fetchverb

To obtain as price or equivalent; to sell for.

‘Our native horses were held in small esteem, and fetched low prices.’;

Catchnoun

A type of humorous round in which the voices gradually catch up with one another; usually sung by men and often having bawdy lyrics.

Fetchverb

To recall from a swoon; to revive; - sometimes with to; as, to fetch a man to.

‘Fetching men again when they swoon.’;

Catchnoun

The refrain; a line or lines of a song which are repeated from verse to verse. s

Fetchverb

To reduce; to throw.

‘The sudden trip in wrestling that fetches a man to the ground.’;

Catchnoun

The act of catching a hit ball before it reaches the ground, resulting in an out.

Fetchverb

To bring to accomplishment; to achieve; to make; to perform, with certain objects; as, to fetch a compass; to fetch a leap; to fetch a sigh.

‘I'll fetch a turn about the garden.’; ‘He fetches his blow quick and sure.’;

Catchnoun

A player in respect of his catching ability; particularly one who catches well.

Fetchverb

To bring or get within reach by going; to reach; to arrive at; to attain; to reach by sailing.

‘Meantine flew our ships, and straight we fetchedThe siren's isle.’;

Catchnoun

The first contact of an oar with the water.

Fetchverb

To cause to come; to bring to a particular state.

‘They could n't fetch the butter in the churn.’;

Catchnoun

A stoppage of breath, resembling a slight cough.

Fetchverb

To bring one's self; to make headway; to veer; as, to fetch about; to fetch to windward.

Catchnoun

Passing opportunities seized; snatches.

Fetchnoun

A stratagem by which a thing is indirectly brought to pass, or by which one thing seems intended and another is done; a trick; an artifice.

‘Every little fetch of wit and criticism.’;

Catchnoun

A slight remembrance; a trace.

Fetchnoun

The apparation of a living person; a wraith.

‘The very fetch and ghost of Mrs. Gamp.’;

Catchverb

(heading) To capture, overtake.

Fetchnoun

The unobstructed region of the ocean over which the wind blows to generate waves.

Catchverb

(transitive) To capture or snare (someone or something which would rather escape). s

‘I hope I catch a fish.’; ‘He ran but we caught him at the exit.’; ‘The police caught the robber at a nearby casino.’;

Fetchnoun

The length of such a region.

Catchverb

(transitive) To entrap or trip up a person; to deceive.

Fetchverb

go or come after and bring or take back;

‘Get me those books over there, please’; ‘Could you bring the wine?’; ‘The dog fetched the hat’;

Catchverb

To marry or enter into a similar relationship with.

Fetchverb

be sold for a certain price;

‘The painting brought $10,000’; ‘The old print fetched a high price at the auction’;

Catchverb

(transitive) To reach (someone) with a strike, blow, weapon etc.

‘If he catches you on the chin, you'll be on the mat.’;

Fetchverb

take away or remove;

‘The devil will fetch you!’;

Catchverb

(transitive) To overtake or catch up to; to be in time for.

‘If you leave now you might catch him.’; ‘I would love to have dinner but I have to catch a plane.’;

Fetchverb

go for and then bring back (someone or something) for someone

‘he ran to fetch help’; ‘she fetched me a cup of tea’;

Catchverb

(transitive) To unpleasantly discover unexpectedly; to unpleasantly surprise (someone doing something).

‘He was caught on video robbing the bank.’; ‘He was caught in the act of stealing a biscuit.’;

Fetchverb

bring forth (blood or tears)

‘kind offers fetched tears from me’;

Catchverb

(transitive) To travel by means of.

‘catch the bus’;

Fetchverb

take a (breath); heave (a sigh).

Catchverb

To become pregnant. (Only in past tense or as participle.)

Fetchverb

achieve (a particular price) when sold

‘the land could fetch over a million pounds’;

Catchverb

(heading) To seize hold of.

Fetchverb

inflict (a blow or slap) on (someone)

‘that brute Cullam fetched him a wallop’;

Catchverb

To grab, seize, take hold of.

‘I caught her by the arm and turned her to face me.’;

Fetchverb

cause great interest or delight in (someone)

‘that air of his always fetches women’;

Catchverb

(transitive) To take or replenish something necessary, such as breath or sleep.

‘I have to stop for a moment and catch my breath.’; ‘I caught some Z's on the train.’;

Fetchnoun

the distance travelled by wind or waves across open water.

Catchverb

(transitive) To grip or entangle.

‘My leg was caught in a tree-root.’;

Fetchnoun

the distance a vessel must sail to reach open water.

Catchverb

(intransitive) To be held back or impeded.

‘Be careful your dress doesn't catch on that knob.’; ‘His voice caught when he came to his father's name.’;

Fetchnoun

a stratagem or trick.

Catchverb

(intransitive) To engage with some mechanism; to stick, to succeed in interacting with something or initiating some process. t

‘Push it in until it catches.’; ‘The engine finally caught and roared to life.’;

Fetchnoun

the apparition or double of a living person, formerly believed to be a warning of that person's impending death.

Catchverb

(transitive) To have something be held back or impeded.

‘I caught my heel on the threshold.’;

Catchverb

(intransitive) To make a grasping or snatching motion (at).

‘He caught at the railing as he fell.’;

Catchverb

(transitive) Of fire, to spread or be conveyed to.

‘The fire spread slowly until it caught the eaves of the barn.’;

Catchverb

To grip (the water) with one's oars at the beginning of the stroke.

Catchverb

To germinate and set down roots.

‘The seeds caught and grew.’;

Catchverb

To contact a wave in such a way that one can ride it back to shore.

Catchverb

To handle an exception. t

‘When the program catches an exception, this is recorded in the log file.’;

Catchverb

(heading) To intercept.

Catchverb

(transitive) To seize or intercept an object moving through the air (or, sometimes, some other medium). t

‘I will throw you the ball, and you catch it.’; ‘Watch me catch this raisin in my mouth.’;

Catchverb

To seize (an opportunity) when it occurs. t

Catchverb

To end a player's innings by catching a hit ball before the first bounce.

‘Townsend hit 29 before he was caught by Wilson.’;

Catchverb

To play (a specific period of time) as the catcher.

‘He caught the last three innings.’;

Catchverb

(heading) To receive (by being in the way).

Catchverb

(transitive) To be the victim of (something unpleasant, painful etc.).

‘You're going to catch a beating if they find out.’;

Catchverb

(transitive) To be touched or affected by (something) through exposure.

‘The sunlight caught the leaves and the trees turned to gold.’; ‘Her hair was caught by the light breeze.’;

Catchverb

(transitive) To be infected by (an illness).

‘Everyone seems to be catching the flu this week.’;

Catchverb

(intransitive) To spread by infection or similar means.

Catchverb

To receive or be affected by (wind, water, fire etc.).

‘The bucket catches water from the downspout.’; ‘The trees caught quickly in the dry wind.’;

Catchverb

(transitive) To acquire, as though by infection; to take on through sympathy or infection.

‘She finally caught the mood of the occasion.’;

Catchverb

(transitive) To be hit by something. s

‘He caught a bullet in the back of the head last year.’;

Catchverb

(intransitive) To serve well or poorly for catching, especially for catching fish.

Catchverb

To get pregnant.

‘Well, if you didn't catch this time, we'll have more fun trying again until you do.’;

Catchverb

(heading) To take in with one's senses or intellect.

Catchverb

(transitive) To grasp mentally: perceive and understand. t

‘Did you catch his name?’; ‘Did you catch the way she looked at him?’;

Catchverb

To take in; to watch or listen to (an entertainment).

‘I have some free time tonight so I think I'll catch a movie.’;

Catchverb

(transitive) To reproduce or echo a spirit or idea faithfully.

‘You've really caught his determination in this sketch.’;

Catchverb

(heading) To seize attention, interest.

Catchverb

(transitive) To charm or entrance.

Catchverb

(transitive) To attract and hold (a faculty or organ of sense).

‘He managed to catch her attention.’; ‘The enormous scarf did catch my eye.’;

Catchverb

(heading) To obtain or experience

Catchverb

To lay hold on; to seize, especially with the hand; to grasp (anything) in motion, with the effect of holding; as, to catch a ball.

Catchverb

To seize after pursuing; to arrest; as, to catch a thief.

Catchverb

To take captive, as in a snare or net, or on a hook; as, to catch a bird or fish.

Catchverb

Hence: To insnare; to entangle.

Catchverb

To seize with the senses or the mind; to apprehend; as, to catch a melody.

Catchverb

To communicate to; to fasten upon; as, the fire caught the adjoining building.

Catchverb

To engage and attach; to please; to charm.

‘The soothing arts that catch the fair.’;

Catchverb

To get possession of; to attain.

‘Torment myself to catch the English throne.’;

Catchverb

To take or receive; esp. to take by sympathy, contagion, infection, or exposure; as, to catch the spirit of an occasion; to catch the measles or smallpox; to catch cold; the house caught fire.

Catchverb

To come upon unexpectedly or by surprise; to find; as, to catch one in the act of stealing.

Catchverb

To reach in time; to come up with; as, to catch a train.

Catchverb

To attain possession.

‘Have is have, however men do catch.’;

Catchverb

To be held or impeded by entanglement or a light obstruction; as, a kite catches in a tree; a door catches so as not to open.

Catchverb

To take hold; as, the bolt does not catch.

Catchverb

To spread by, or as by, infecting; to communicate.

‘Does the sedition catch from man to man?’;

Catchnoun

Act of seizing; a grasp.

Catchnoun

That by which anything is caught or temporarily fastened; as, the catch of a gate.

Catchnoun

The posture of seizing; a state of preparation to lay hold of, or of watching he opportunity to seize; as, to lie on the catch.

‘The common and the canon law . . . lie at catch, and wait advantages one againt another.’;

Catchnoun

That which is caught or taken; profit; gain; especially, the whole quantity caught or taken at one time; as, a good catch of fish.

‘Hector shall have a great catch if he knock out either of your brains.’;

Catchnoun

Something desirable to be caught, esp. a husband or wife in matrimony.

Catchnoun

Passing opportunities seized; snatches.

‘It has been writ by catches with many intervals.’;

Catchnoun

A slight remembrance; a trace.

‘We retain a catch of those pretty stories.’;

Catchnoun

A humorous canon or round, so contrived that the singers catch up each other's words.

Catchnoun

a hidden drawback;

‘it sounds good but what's the catch?’;

Catchnoun

the quantity that was caught;

‘the catch was only 10 fish’;

Catchnoun

a person regarded as a good matrimonial prospect

Catchnoun

anything that is caught (especially if it is worth catching);

‘he shared his catch with the others’;

Catchnoun

a break or check in the voice (usually a sign of strong emotion)

Catchnoun

a restraint that checks the motion of something;

‘he used a book as a stop to hold the door open’;

Catchnoun

a fastener that fastens or locks a door or window

Catchnoun

a cooperative game in which a ball is passed back and forth;

‘he played catch with his son in the backyard’;

Catchnoun

the act of catching an object with the hands;

‘Mays made the catch with his back to the plate’; ‘he made a grab for the ball before it landed’; ‘Martin's snatch at the bridle failed and the horse raced away’; ‘the infielder's snap and throw was a single motion’;

Catchnoun

the act of apprehending (especially apprehending a criminal);

‘the policeman on the beat got credit for the collar’;

Catchverb

discover or come upon accidentally, suddenly, or unexpectedly; catch somebody doing something or in a certain state;

‘She caught her son eating candy’; ‘She was caught shoplifting’;

Catchverb

perceive with the senses quickly, suddenly, or momentarily;

‘I caught the aroma of coffee’; ‘He caught the allusion in her glance’; ‘ears open to catch every sound’; ‘The dog picked up the scent’; ‘Catch a glimpse’;

Catchverb

reach with a blow or hit in a particular spot;

‘the rock caught her in the back of the head’; ‘The blow got him in the back’; ‘The punch caught him in the stomach’;

Catchverb

take hold of so as to seize or restrain or stop the motion of;

‘Catch the ball!’; ‘Grab the elevator door!’;

Catchverb

succeed in catching or seizing, especially after a chase;

‘We finally got the suspect’; ‘Did you catch the thief?’;

Catchverb

to hook or entangle;

‘One foot caught in the stirrup’;

Catchverb

attract and fix;

‘His look caught her’; ‘She caught his eye’; ‘Catch the attention of the waiter’;

Catchverb

capture as if by hunting, snaring, or trapping;

‘I caught a rabbit in the trap toady’;

Catchverb

reach in time;

‘I have to catch a train at 7 o'clock’;

Catchverb

get or regain something necessary, usually quickly or briefly;

‘Catch some sleep’; ‘catch one's breath’;

Catchverb

catch up with and possibly overtake;

‘The Rolls Royce caught us near the exit ramp’;

Catchverb

be struck or affected by;

‘catch fire’; ‘catch the mood’;

Catchverb

check oneself during an action;

‘She managed to catch herself before telling her boss what was on her mind’;

Catchverb

hear, usually without the knowledge of the speakers;

‘We overheard the conversation at the next table’;

Catchverb

see or watch;

‘view a show on television’; ‘This program will be seen all over the world’; ‘view an exhibition’; ‘Catch a show on Broadway’; ‘see a movie’;

Catchverb

cause to become accidentally or suddenly caught, ensnared, or entangled;

‘I caught the hem of my dress in the brambles’;

Catchverb

detect a blunder or misstep;

‘The reporter tripped up the senator’;

Catchverb

grasp with the mind or develop an undersatnding of;

‘did you catch that allusion?’; ‘We caught something of his theory in the lecture’; ‘don't catch your meaning’; ‘did you get it?’; ‘She didn't get the joke’; ‘I just don't get him’;

Catchverb

contract;

‘did you catch a cold?’;

Catchverb

start burning;

‘The fire caught’;

Catchverb

perceive by hearing;

‘I didn't catch your name’; ‘She didn't get his name when they met the first time’;

Catchverb

suffer from the receipt of;

‘She will catch hell for this behavior!’;

Catchverb

attract; cause to be enamored;

‘She captured all the men's hearts’;

Catchverb

apprehend and reproduce accurately;

‘She really caught the spirit of the place in her drawings’; ‘She got the mood just right in her photographs’;

Catchverb

take in and retain;

‘We have a big barrel to catch the rainwater’;

Catchverb

spread or be communicated;

‘The fashion did not catch’;

Catchverb

be the catcher;

‘Who is catching?’;

Catchverb

become aware of;

‘he caught her staring out the window’;

Catchverb

delay or hold up; prevent from proceeding on schedule or as planned;

‘I was caught in traffic and missed the meeting’;

Catchverb

intercept and hold (something which has been thrown, propelled, or dropped)

‘she threw the bottle into the air and caught it again’;

Catchverb

intercept the fall of (someone)

‘he fell forwards and Linda caught him’;

Catchverb

seize or take hold of

‘he caught hold of her arm as she tried to push past him’;

Catchverb

grasp or try to grasp

‘his hands caught at her arms as she tried to turn away’;

Catchverb

dismiss (a batsman) by catching the ball before it touches the ground

‘I was caught on the square-leg boundary for 96’;

Catchverb

capture (a person or animal that tries or would try to escape)

‘we hadn't caught a single rabbit’;

Catchverb

succeed in reaching a person who is ahead of one.

Catchverb

unexpectedly find oneself in (an unwelcome situation)

‘my sister was caught in a thunderstorm’;

Catchverb

surprise (someone) in an incriminating situation or in the act of doing something wrong

‘he was caught with bomb-making equipment in his home’;

Catchverb

come upon (someone) unexpectedly

‘unexpected snow caught us by surprise’;

Catchverb

(of an object) accidentally become entangled or trapped in something

‘a button caught in her hair’;

Catchverb

have (a part of one's body or clothing) become entangled or trapped in something

‘she caught her foot in the bedspread’; ‘companies face increased risks of being caught in a downward spiral’;

Catchverb

fix or fasten in place

‘her hair was caught up in a chignon’;

Catchverb

reach in time and board (a train, bus, or aircraft)

‘they caught the 12.15 from Oxford’;

Catchverb

reach or be in a place in time to see (a person, performance, programme, etc.)

‘she was hurrying downstairs to catch the news’;

Catchverb

attend or watch (a performance)

‘we'll get some burgers and catch a movie’;

Catchverb

engage (a person's interest or imagination)

‘it was the business scheme that had caught his imagination’;

Catchverb

perceive fleetingly

‘she caught a glimpse of herself in the mirror’;

Catchverb

hear or understand (something said), especially with effort

‘he bellowed something Jess couldn't catch’;

Catchverb

succeed in evoking or representing

‘the programme caught something of the flavour of Minoan culture’;

Catchverb

strike (someone) on a part of the body

‘Ben caught him on the chin with an uppercut’;

Catchverb

accidentally strike (a part of one's body) against something

‘she fell and caught her head on the corner of the hearth’;

Catchverb

contract (an illness) through infection or contagion

‘he served in Macedonia, where he caught malaria’;

Catchverb

become ignited and start burning

‘the rafters have caught’;

Catchverb

(of an engine) fire and start running

‘the generator caught immediately’;

Catchnoun

an act of catching something, typically a ball.

Catchnoun

a chance or act of catching the ball to dismiss a batsman

‘he took a brilliant catch at deep square leg’;

Catchnoun

an amount of fish caught

‘the UK's North Sea haddock catch’;

Catchnoun

a person considered desirable as a partner or spouse

‘I mistakenly thought he would be a good catch’;

Catchnoun

a game in which a ball is thrown back and forth between two or more players.

Catchnoun

a device for securing something such as a door, window, or box

‘the window catch was rusty’;

Catchnoun

a hidden problem or disadvantage in an apparently ideal situation

‘there's a catch in it somewhere’;

Catchnoun

an unevenness in a person's voice caused by emotion

‘there was a catch in Anne's voice’;

Catchnoun

a round, typically one with words arranged to produce a humorous effect.

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