Extract vs. Abstract - What's the difference?

Wikipedia

  • Extract

    An extract is a substance made by extracting a part of a raw material, often by using a solvent such as ethanol or water. Extracts may be sold as tinctures, absolutes or in powder form. The aromatic principles of many spices, nuts, herbs, fruits, etc., and some flowers, are marketed as extracts, among the best known of true extracts being almond, cinnamon, cloves, ginger, lemon, nutmeg, orange, peppermint, pistachio, rose, spearmint, vanilla, violet, rum, and wintergreen.

Wiktionary

  • Extract (noun)

    Something that is extracted or drawn out.

  • Extract (noun)

    A portion of a book or document, incorporated distinctly in another work; a citation; a quotation.

    "I used an extract of Hemingway's book to demonstrate culture shock."

  • Extract (noun)

    A decoction, solution, or infusion made by drawing out from any substance that which gives it its essential and characteristic virtue

    "extract of beef"

    "extract of dandelion"

  • Extract (noun)

    Any substance extracted is such a way, and characteristic of that from which it is obtained

    "quinine is the most important extract of Peruvian bark."

  • Extract (noun)

    A solid preparation obtained by evaporating a solution of a drug, etc., or the fresh juice of a plant (distinguished from an abstract).

  • Extract (noun)

    A peculiar principle (fundamental essence) once erroneously supposed to form the basis of all vegetable extracts.

  • Extract (noun)

    Ancestry; descent.

  • Extract (noun)

    A draft or copy of writing; a certified copy of the proceedings in an action and the judgment therein, with an order for execution.

  • Extract (verb)

    To draw out; to pull out; to remove forcibly from a fixed position, as by traction or suction, etc.

    "to extract a tooth from its socket, a stump from the earth, or a splinter from the finger"

  • Extract (verb)

    To withdraw by expression, distillation, or other mechanical or chemical process. Compare abstract (transitive verb).

    "to extract an essential oil from a plant"

  • Extract (verb)

    To take by selection; to choose out; to cite or quote, as a passage from a book.

  • Extract (verb)

    To select parts of a whole

    "We need to try to extract the positives from the defeat."

  • Extract (verb)

    To determine (a root of a number).

    "Please extract the cube root of 27."

  • Abstract (noun)

    An abridgement or summary of a longer publication. First attested around 1350 to 1470.page=10

  • Abstract (noun)

    Something that concentrates in itself the qualities of a larger item, or multiple items. First attested in the mid 16th century.

  • Abstract (noun)

    Concentrated essence of a product.

  • Abstract (noun)

    An abstract term; that which is abstract. First attested in the mid 16th century.

  • Abstract (noun)

    The theoretical way of looking at things; something that exists only in idealized form. First attested in the early 17th century.

  • Abstract (noun)

    An abstract work of art. First attested in the early 20th century.

  • Abstract (noun)

    A summary title of the key points detailing a tract of land, for ownership; abstract of title.

  • Abstract (adjective)

    Derived; extracted. Attested from around 1350 to 1470 until the late 15th century.

  • Abstract (adjective)

    Drawn away; removed from; apart from; separate. First attested around 1350 to 1470.

  • Abstract (adjective)

    Expressing a property or attribute separately of an object that is considered to be inherent to that object. First attested around 1350 to 1470.

  • Abstract (adjective)

    Considered apart from any application to a particular object; not concrete; ideal; non-specific; general, as opposed to specific. First attested around 1350 to 1470.

  • Abstract (adjective)

    Difficult to understand; abstruse; hard to conceptualize. First attested around 1350 to 1470.

  • Abstract (adjective)

    Absent-minded. First attested in the early 16th century.

  • Abstract (adjective)

    Pertaining to the formal aspect of art, such as the lines, colors, shapes, and the relationships among them. First attested in the mid 19th century.

  • Abstract (adjective)

    Free from representational qualities, in particular the non-representational styles of the 20th century. First attested in the mid 19th century.

  • Abstract (adjective)

    Absolute.

  • Abstract (adjective)

    Insufficiently factual.page=8

  • Abstract (adjective)

    Apart from practice or reality; vague; theoretical; impersonal; not applied.

  • Abstract (adjective)

    As a noun, denoting an intangible as opposed to an object, place, or person.

  • Abstract (adjective)

    Of a class in object-oriented programming, being a partial basis for subclasses rather than a complete template for objects.

  • Abstract (verb)

    To separate; to disengage. First attested around 1350 to 1470.

  • Abstract (verb)

    To remove; to take away; withdraw. First attested in the late 15th century.

  • Abstract (verb)

    To steal; to take away; to remove without permission. First attested in the late 15th century.

  • Abstract (verb)

    To summarize; to abridge; to epitomize. First attested in the late 16th century.

  • Abstract (verb)

    To extract by means of distillation. Attested from the early 17th century until the early 18th century.

  • Abstract (verb)

    To consider abstractly; to contemplate separately or by itself; to consider theoretically; to look at as a general quality. First attested in the early 17th century.

  • Abstract (verb)

    To withdraw oneself; to retire. First attested in the mid 17th century.

  • Abstract (verb)

    To draw off (interest or attention).

    "He was wholly abstracted by other objects."

  • Abstract (verb)

    To perform the process of abstraction.

  • Abstract (verb)

    To create abstractions.

  • Abstract (verb)

    To produce an abstraction, usually by refactoring existing code. Generally used with "out".

    "He abstracted out the square root function."

Oxford Dictionary

  • Extract (verb)

    remove or take out, especially by effort or force

    "the fossils are extracted from the chalk"

  • Extract (verb)

    obtain (a substance or resource) from something by a special method

    "lead was extracted from the copper"

  • Extract (verb)

    obtain (something such as money or information) from someone unwilling to give it

    "I won't let you go without trying to extract a promise from you"

  • Extract (verb)

    select (a passage from a text, film, or piece of music) for quotation, performance, or reproduction

    "the table is extracted from the report"

  • Extract (verb)

    derive (an idea) from a body of information

    "there are few attempts to extract generalities about the nature of the disciplines"

  • Extract (verb)

    calculate (a root of a number)

    "early computers had an instruction to extract a square root"

  • Extract (noun)

    a short passage taken from a text, film, or piece of music

    "an extract from a historical film"

  • Extract (noun)

    a preparation containing the active ingredient of a substance in concentrated form

    "natural plant extracts"

    "a shampoo with extract of camomile"

Webster Dictionary

  • Extract

    To draw out or forth; to pull out; to remove forcibly from a fixed position, as by traction or suction, etc.; as, to extract a tooth from its socket, a stump from the earth, a splinter from the finger.

  • Extract

    To withdraw by expression, distillation, or other mechanical or chemical process; as, to extract an essence. Cf. Abstract, v. t., 6.

  • Extract

    To take by selection; to choose out; to cite or quote, as a passage from a book.

  • Extract (noun)

    That which is extracted or drawn out.

  • Extract (noun)

    A portion of a book or document, separately transcribed; a citation; a quotation.

  • Extract (noun)

    A decoction, solution, or infusion made by dissolving out from any substance that which gives it its essential and characteristic virtue; essence; as, extract of beef; extract of dandelion; also, any substance so extracted, and characteristic of that from which it is obtained; as, quinine is the most important extract of Peruvian bark.

  • Extract (noun)

    A solid preparation obtained by evaporating a solution of a drug, etc., or the fresh juice of a plant; - distinguished from an abstract. See Abstract, n., 4.

  • Extract (noun)

    A peculiar principle once erroneously supposed to form the basis of all vegetable extracts; - called also the extractive principle.

  • Extract (noun)

    Extraction; descent.

  • Extract (noun)

    A draught or copy of writing; certified copy of the proceedings in an action and the judgement therein, with an order for execution.

  • Abstract (adjective)

    Withdraw; separate.

  • Abstract (adjective)

    Considered apart from any application to a particular object; separated from matter; existing in the mind only; as, abstract truth, abstract numbers. Hence: ideal; abstruse; difficult.

  • Abstract (adjective)

    Expressing a particular property of an object viewed apart from the other properties which constitute it; - opposed to concrete; as, honesty is an abstract word.

  • Abstract (adjective)

    Abstracted; absent in mind.

  • Abstract

    To withdraw; to separate; to take away.

  • Abstract

    To draw off in respect to interest or attention; as, his was wholly abstracted by other objects.

  • Abstract

    To separate, as ideas, by the operation of the mind; to consider by itself; to contemplate separately, as a quality or attribute.

  • Abstract

    To epitomize; to abridge.

  • Abstract

    To take secretly or dishonestly; to purloin; as, to abstract goods from a parcel, or money from a till.

  • Abstract

    To separate, as the more volatile or soluble parts of a substance, by distillation or other chemical processes. In this sense extract is now more generally used.

  • Abstract

    To perform the process of abstraction.

  • Abstract (noun)

    That which comprises or concentrates in itself the essential qualities of a larger thing or of several things. Specifically: A summary or an epitome, as of a treatise or book, or of a statement; a brief.

  • Abstract (noun)

    A state of separation from other things; as, to consider a subject in the abstract, or apart from other associated things.

  • Abstract (noun)

    An abstract term.

  • Abstract (noun)

    A powdered solid extract of a vegetable substance mixed with sugar of milk in such proportion that one part of the abstract represents two parts of the original substance.

Princeton's WordNet

  • Extract (noun)

    a solution obtained by steeping or soaking a substance (usually in water)

  • Extract (noun)

    a passage selected from a larger work;

    "he presented excerpts from William James' philosophical writings"

  • Extract (verb)

    draw or pull out, usually with some force or effort; also used in an abstract sense;

    "pull weeds"

    "extract a bad tooth"

    "take out a splinter"

    "extract information from the telegram"

  • Extract (verb)

    get despite difficulties or obstacles;

    "I extracted a promise from the Dean for two ne positions"

  • Extract (verb)

    deduce (a principle) or construe (a meaning);

    "We drew out some interesting linguistic data from the native informant"

  • Extract (verb)

    extract by the process of distillation;

    "distill the essence of this compound"

  • Extract (verb)

    separate (a metal) from an ore

  • Extract (verb)

    obtain from a substance, as by mechanical action;

    "Italians express coffee rather than filter it"

  • Extract (verb)

    take out of a literary work in order to cite or copy

  • Extract (verb)

    calculate the root of a number

  • Abstract (noun)

    a concept or idea not associated with any specific instance;

    "he loved her only in the abstract--not in person"

  • Abstract (noun)

    a sketchy summary of the main points of an argument or theory

  • Abstract (verb)

    consider a concept without thinking of a specific example; consider abstractly or theoretically

  • Abstract (verb)

    make off with belongings of others

  • Abstract (verb)

    consider apart from a particular case or instance;

    "Let's abstract away from this particular example"

  • Abstract (verb)

    give an abstract (of)

  • Abstract (adjective)

    existing only in the mind; separated from embodiment;

    "abstract words like `truth' and `justice'"

  • Abstract (adjective)

    not representing or imitating external reality or the objects of nature;

    "a large abstract painting"

  • Abstract (adjective)

    based on specialized theory;

    "a theoretical analysis"

  • Abstract (adjective)

    dealing with a subject in the abstract without practical purpose or intention;

    "abstract reasoning"

    "abstract science"

Illustrations

Extract

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