Drama vs. Play - What's the difference?

Wikipedia

  • Drama

    Drama is the specific mode of fiction represented in performance: a play, opera, mime, ballet, etc, performed in a theatre, or on radio or television. Considered as a genre of poetry in general, the dramatic mode has been contrasted with the epic and the lyrical modes ever since Aristotle's Poetics (c. 335 BC)—the earliest work of dramatic theory.The term "drama" comes from a Greek word meaning "action" (Classical Greek: δρᾶμα, drama), which is derived from "I do" (Classical Greek: δράω, drao). The two masks associated with drama represent the traditional generic division between comedy and tragedy. In English (as was the analogous case in many other European languages), the word play or game (translating the Anglo-Saxon pleġan or Latin ludus) was the standard term for dramas until William Shakespeare's time—just as its creator was a play-maker rather than a dramatist and the building was a play-house rather than a theatre.The use of "drama" in a more narrow sense to designate a specific type of play dates from the modern era. "Drama" in this sense refers to a play that is neither a comedy nor a tragedy—for example, Zola's Thérèse Raquin (1873) or Chekhov's Ivanov (1887). It is this narrower sense that the film and television industries, along with film studies, adopted to describe "drama" as a genre within their respective media. The term 'Radio drama has been used in both senses—originally transmitted in a live performance. May also refer to the more high-brow and serious end of the dramatic output of radio. The enactment of drama in theatre, performed by actors on a stage before an audience, presupposes collaborative modes of production and a collective form of reception. The structure of dramatic texts, unlike other forms of literature, is directly influenced by this collaborative production and collective reception.Mime is a form of drama where the action of a story is told only through the movement of the body. Drama can be combined with music: the dramatic text in opera is generally sung throughout; as for in some ballets dance "expresses or imitates emotion, character, and narrative action". Musicals include both spoken dialogue and songs; and some forms of drama have incidental music or musical accompaniment underscoring the dialogue (melodrama and Japanese Nō, for example). Closet drama is a form that is intended to be read, rather than performed. In improvisation, the drama does not pre-exist the moment of performance; performers devise a dramatic script spontaneously before an audience.

Wiktionary

  • Drama (noun)

    A composition, normally in prose, telling a story and intended to be represented by actors impersonating the characters and speaking the dialogue

  • Drama (noun)

    Such a work for television, radio or the cinema (usually one that is not a comedy)

  • Drama (noun)

    Theatrical plays in general

  • Drama (noun)

    A situation in real life that has the characteristics of such a theatrical play

  • Drama (noun)

    Rumor, lying or exaggerated reaction to life events; melodrama; an angry dispute or scene; intrigue or spiteful interpersonal maneuvering.

  • Play (verb)

    To act in a manner such that one has fun; to engage in activities expressly for the purpose of recreation or entertainment.

    "They played long and hard."

  • Play (verb)

    To perform in (a sport); to participate in (a game).

    "He plays on three teams."

    "Who's playing now?"

    "play football;"

    "play sports;"

    "play games"

  • Play (verb)

    To compete against, in a game.

    "We're playing one of the top teams in the next round."

  • Play (verb)

    To take part in amorous activity; to make love, fornicate; to have sex.

  • Play (verb)

    To act as the indicated role, especially in a performance.

    "He plays the King, and she's the Queen."

    "No part of the brain plays the role of permanent memory."

  • Play (verb)

    To produce music or theatre.

  • Play (verb)

    (in the scoring of games and sports) To be the opposing score to.

    "Look at the score now ... 23 plays 8!"

  • Play (verb)

    To produce music.

  • Play (verb)

    To produce music using a musical instrument.

    "I've practiced the piano off and on, but I still can't play very well."

  • Play (verb)

    To produce music (or a specified song or musical style) using (a specified musical instrument).

    "I'll play the piano and you sing."

    "Can you play an instrument?"

    "We especially like to play jazz together."

    "Play a song for me."

    "Do you know how to play Für Elise?"

    "My son thinks he can play music."

  • Play (verb)

    To use a device to watch or listen to the indicated recording.

    "You can play the DVD now."

  • Play (verb)

    To be performed; to be shown.

    "His latest film is playing in the local theatre tomorrow."

  • Play (verb)

    To perform in or at; to give performances in or at.

  • Play (verb)

    To behave in a particular way.

  • Play (verb)

    To act or perform (a play).

    "to play a comedy"

  • Play (verb)

    Contrary to fact, to give an appearance of being.

  • Play (verb)

    To act with levity or thoughtlessness; to trifle; to be careless.

  • Play (verb)

    To act; to behave; to practice deception.

  • Play (verb)

    To move in any manner; especially, to move regularly with alternate or reciprocating motion; to operate.

    "The fountain plays."

    "He played the torch beam around the room."

  • Play (verb)

    To move gaily; to disport.

  • Play (verb)

    To put in action or motion.

    "to play cannon upon a fortification;"

    "to play a trump in a card game"

  • Play (verb)

    To keep in play, as a hooked fish, in order to land it.

  • Play (verb)

    To manipulate, deceive, or swindle someone.

    "You played me!"

  • Play (noun)

    Activity for amusement only, especially among the young.

    "Children learn through play."

  • Play (noun)

    Similar activity in young animals, as they explore their environment and learn new skills.

    "This kind of play helps the young lion cubs develop their hunting skills."

  • Play (noun)

    "Repeated, incompletely functional behavior differing from more serious versions ..., and initiated voluntarily when ... in a low-stress setting."

  • Play (noun)

    The conduct, or course, of a game.

    "Play was very slow in the first half."

    "After the rain break, play resumed at 3 o'clock."

  • Play (noun)

    An individual's performance in a sport or game.

    "His play has improved a lot this season."

  • Play (noun)

    A short sequence of action within a game.

    "That was a great play by the Mudchester Rovers forward."

  • Play (noun)

    An action carried out when it is one's turn to play.

    "move"

  • Play (noun)

    A literary composition, intended to be represented by actors impersonating the characters and speaking the dialogue.

    "This book contains all of Shakespeare's plays."

  • Play (noun)

    A theatrical performance featuring actors.

    "We saw a two-act play in the theatre."

  • Play (noun)

    A major move by a business or investor.

    "ABC Widgets makes a play in the bicycle market with its bid to take over Acme Sprockets."

  • Play (noun)

    A geological formation that contains an accumulation or prospect of hydrocarbons or other resources.

  • Play (noun)

    The extent to which a part of a mechanism can move freely.

    "No wonder the fanbelt is slipping: there’s too much play in it."

    "Too much play in a steering wheel may be dangerous."

  • Play (noun)

    Sexual activity or sexual role-playing.

  • Play (noun)

    A button that, when pressed, causes media to be played.

  • Play (noun)

    Activity relating to martial combat or fighting.

    "handplay}}, {{m|en|swordplay"

Oxford Dictionary

  • Drama (noun)

    a play for theatre, radio, or television

    "a gritty urban drama about growing up in Harlem"

  • Drama (noun)

    plays as a genre or style of literature

    "Renaissance drama"

  • Drama (noun)

    the activity of acting

    "drama school"

    "teachers who use drama are working in partnership with pupils"

  • Drama (noun)

    an exciting, emotional, or unexpected event or circumstance

    "a hostage drama"

    "an afternoon of high drama at Wembley"

Webster Dictionary

  • Drama (noun)

    A composition, in prose or poetry, accommodated to action, and intended to exhibit a picture of human life, or to depict a series of grave or humorous actions of more than ordinary interest, tending toward some striking result. It is commonly designed to be spoken and represented by actors on the stage.

  • Drama (noun)

    A series of real events invested with a dramatic unity and interest.

  • Drama (noun)

    Dramatic composition and the literature pertaining to or illustrating it; dramatic literature.

  • Play (verb)

    To engage in sport or lively recreation; to exercise for the sake of amusement; to frolic; to spot.

  • Play (verb)

    To act with levity or thoughtlessness; to trifle; to be careless.

  • Play (verb)

    To contend, or take part, in a game; as, to play ball; hence, to gamble; as, he played for heavy stakes.

  • Play (verb)

    To perform on an instrument of music; as, to play on a flute.

  • Play (verb)

    To act; to behave; to practice deception.

  • Play (verb)

    To move in any manner; especially, to move regularly with alternate or reciprocating motion; to operate; to act; as, the fountain plays.

  • Play (verb)

    To move gayly; to wanton; to disport.

  • Play (verb)

    To act on the stage; to personate a character.

  • Play

    To put in action or motion; as, to play cannon upon a fortification; to play a trump.

  • Play

    To perform music upon; as, to play the flute or the organ.

  • Play

    To perform, as a piece of music, on an instrument; as, to play a waltz on the violin.

  • Play

    To bring into sportive or wanton action; to exhibit in action; to execute; as, to play tricks.

  • Play

    To act or perform (a play); to represent in music action; as, to play a comedy; also, to act in the character of; to represent by acting; to simulate; to behave like; as, to play King Lear; to play the woman.

  • Play

    To engage in, or go together with, as a contest for amusement or for a wager or prize; as, to play a game at baseball.

  • Play

    To keep in play, as a hooked fish, in order to land it.

  • Play (noun)

    Amusement; sport; frolic; gambols.

  • Play (noun)

    Any exercise, or series of actions, intended for amusement or diversion; a game.

  • Play (noun)

    The act or practice of contending for victory, amusement, or a prize, as at dice, cards, or billiards; gaming; as, to lose a fortune in play.

  • Play (noun)

    Action; use; employment; exercise; practice; as, fair play; sword play; a play of wit.

  • Play (noun)

    A dramatic composition; a comedy or tragedy; a composition in which characters are represented by dialogue and action.

  • Play (noun)

    The representation or exhibition of a comedy or tragedy; as, he attends ever play.

  • Play (noun)

    Performance on an instrument of music.

  • Play (noun)

    Motion; movement, regular or irregular; as, the play of a wheel or piston; hence, also, room for motion; free and easy action.

  • Play (noun)

    Hence, liberty of acting; room for enlargement or display; scope; as, to give full play to mirth.

Princeton's WordNet

  • Drama (noun)

    a dramatic work intended for performance by actors on a stage;

    "he wrote several plays but only one was produced on Broadway"

  • Drama (noun)

    an episode that is turbulent or highly emotional

  • Drama (noun)

    the literary genre of works intended for the theater

  • Drama (noun)

    the quality of being arresting or highly emotional

  • Play (noun)

    a dramatic work intended for performance by actors on a stage;

    "he wrote several plays but only one was produced on Broadway"

  • Play (noun)

    a theatrical performance of a drama;

    "the play lasted two hours"

  • Play (noun)

    a preset plan of action in team sports;

    "the coach drew up the plays for her team"

  • Play (noun)

    a deliberate coordinated movement requiring dexterity and skill;

    "he made a great maneuver"

    "the runner was out on a play by the shortstop"

  • Play (noun)

    a state in which action is feasible;

    "the ball was still in play"

    "insiders said the company's stock was in play"

  • Play (noun)

    utilization or exercise;

    "the play of the imagination"

  • Play (noun)

    an attempt to get something;

    "they made a futile play for power"

    "he made a bid to gain attention"

  • Play (noun)

    play by children that is guided more by imagination than by fixed rules;

    "Freud believed in the utility of play to a small child"

  • Play (noun)

    (in games or plays or other performances) the time during which play proceeds;

    "rain stopped play in the 4th inning"

  • Play (noun)

    the removal of constraints;

    "he gave free rein to his impulses"

    "they gave full play to the artist's talent"

  • Play (noun)

    a weak and tremulous light;

    "the shimmer of colors on iridescent feathers"

    "the play of light on the water"

  • Play (noun)

    verbal wit (often at another's expense but not to be taken seriously);

    "he became a figure of fun"

  • Play (noun)

    movement or space for movement;

    "there was too much play in the steering wheel"

  • Play (noun)

    gay or light-hearted recreational activity for diversion or amusement;

    "it was all done in play"

    "their frolic in the surf threatened to become ugly"

  • Play (noun)

    the act of playing for stakes in the hope of winning (including the payment of a price for a chance to win a prize);

    "his gambling cost him a fortune"

    "there was heavy play at the blackjack table"

  • Play (noun)

    the activity of doing something in an agreed succession;

    "it is my turn"

    "it is still my play"

  • Play (noun)

    the act using a sword (or other weapon) vigorously and skillfully

  • Play (verb)

    participate in games or sport;

    "We played hockey all afternoon"

    "play cards"

    "Pele played for the Brazilian teams in many important matches"

  • Play (verb)

    act or have an effect in a specified way or with a specific effect or outcome;

    "This factor played only a minor part in his decision"

    "This development played into her hands"

    "I played no role in your dismissal"

  • Play (verb)

    play on an instrument;

    "The band played all night long"

  • Play (verb)

    play a role or part;

    "Gielgud played Hamlet"

    "She wants to act Lady Macbeth, but she is too young for the role"

    "She played the servant to her husband's master"

  • Play (verb)

    be at play; be engaged in playful activity; amuse oneself in a way characteristic of children;

    "The kids were playing outside all day"

    "I used to play with trucks as a little girl"

  • Play (verb)

    replay (as a melody);

    "Play it again, Sam"

    "She played the third movement very beautifully"

  • Play (verb)

    perform music on (a musical instrument);

    "He plays the flute"

    "Can you play on this old recorder?"

  • Play (verb)

    pretend to have certain qualities or state of mind;

    "He acted the idiot"

    "She plays deaf when the news are bad"

  • Play (verb)

    move or seem to move quickly, lightly, or irregularly;

    "The spotlights played on the politicians"

  • Play (verb)

    bet or wager (money);

    "He played $20 on the new horse"

    "She plays the races"

  • Play (verb)

    engage in recreational activities rather than work; occupy oneself in a diversion;

    "On weekends I play"

    "The students all recreate alike"

  • Play (verb)

    pretend to be somebody in the framework of a game or playful activity;

    "Let's play like I am mommy"

    "Play cowboy and Indians"

  • Play (verb)

    emit recorded sound;

    "The tape was playing for hours"

    "the stereo was playing Beethoven when I entered"

  • Play (verb)

    perform on a certain location;

    "The prodigy played Carnegie Hall at the age of 16"

    "She has been playing on Broadway for years"

  • Play (verb)

    put (a card or piece) into play during a game, or act strategically as if in a card game;

    "He is playing his cards close to his chest"

    "The Democrats still have some cards to play before they will concede the electoral victory"

  • Play (verb)

    engage in an activity as if it were a game rather than take it seriously;

    "They played games on their opponents"

    "play the stockmarket"

    "play with her feelings"

    "toy with an idea"

  • Play (verb)

    behave in a certain way;

    "play safe"

    "play it safe"

    "play fair"

  • Play (verb)

    cause to emit recorded sounds;

    "They ran the tapes over and over again"

    "Can you play my favorite record?"

  • Play (verb)

    manipulate manually or in one's mind or imagination;

    "She played nervously with her wedding ring"

    "Don't fiddle with the screws"

    "He played with the idea of running for the Senate"

  • Play (verb)

    use to one's advantage;

    "She plays on her clients' emotions"

  • Play (verb)

    consider not very seriously;

    "He is trifling with her"

    "She plays with the thought of moving to Tasmania"

  • Play (verb)

    be received or accepted or interpreted in a specific way;

    "This speech didn't play well with the American public"

    "His remarks played to the suspicions of the committee"

  • Play (verb)

    behave carelessly or indifferently;

    "Play about with a young girl's affection"

  • Play (verb)

    cause to move or operate freely within a bounded space;

    "The engine has a wheel that is playing in a rack"

  • Play (verb)

    perform on a stage or theater;

    "She acts in this play"

    "He acted in `Julius Caesar'"

    "I played in `A Christmas Carol'"

  • Play (verb)

    be performed;

    "What's playing in the local movie theater?"

    "`Cats' has been playing on Broadway for many years"

  • Play (verb)

    cause to happen or to occur as a consequence;

    "I cannot work a miracle"

    "wreak havoc"

    "bring comments"

    "play a joke"

    "The rain brought relief to the drought-stricken area"

  • Play (verb)

    discharge or direct or be discharged or directed as if in a continuous stream;

    "play water from a hose"

    "The fountains played all day"

  • Play (verb)

    make bets;

    "Play the reaces"

    "play the casinos in Trouville"

  • Play (verb)

    stake on the outcome of an issue;

    "I bet $100 on that new horse"

    "She played all her money on the dark horse"

  • Play (verb)

    shoot or hit in a particular manner;

    "She played a good backhand last night"

  • Play (verb)

    use or move;

    "I had to play my queen"

  • Play (verb)

    employ in a game or in a specific position;

    "They played him on first base"

  • Play (verb)

    contend against an opponent in a sport, game, or battle;

    "Princeton plays Yale this weekend"

    "Charlie likes to play Mary"

  • Play (verb)

    exhaust by allowing to pull on the line;

    "play a hooked fish"

Illustrations

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