VS.

Dunnage vs. Timber

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Dunnagenoun

Scrap material, often wood, used to fill spaces to prevent the shifting of more valuable items during transport, or underneath large or heavy items to raise them slightly above the ground, in order to protect from chafing and wet.

Timbernoun

(uncountable) Trees in a forest regarded as a source of wood.

Dunnagenoun

Personal effects; baggage.

Timbernoun

Wood that has been pre-cut and is ready for use in construction.

Dunnagenoun

Fagots, boughs, or loose materials of any kind, laid on the bottom of the hold for the cargo to rest upon to prevent injury by water, or stowed among casks and other cargo to prevent their motion.

Timbernoun

(countable) A heavy wooden beam, generally a whole log that has been squared off and used to provide heavy support for something such as a roof.

‘the timbers of a ship’;

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Dunnage

Dunnage is inexpensive or waste material used to load and secure cargo during transportation; more loosely, it refers to miscellaneous baggage, brought along during travel. The term can also refer to low-priority cargo used to fill out transport capacity which would otherwise ship underweight.

Timbernoun

The wooden stock of a rifle or shotgun.

Timbernoun

(archaic) A certain quantity of fur skins (as of martens, ermines, sables, etc.) packed between boards; in some cases forty skins, in others one hundred and twenty. Also timmer, timbre.

Timberinterjection

Used by loggers to warn others that a tree being felled is falling.

Timberverb

(transitive) To fit with timbers.

‘timbering a roof’;

Timberverb

To construct, frame, build.

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Timberverb

To light or land on a tree.

Timberverb

(obsolete) To make a nest.

Timberverb

(transitive) To surmount as a timber does.

Timbernoun

A certain quantity of fur skins, as of martens, ermines, sables, etc., packed between boards; being in some cases forty skins, in others one hundred and twenty; - called also timmer.

Timbernoun

The crest on a coat of arms.

Timbernoun

That sort of wood which is proper for buildings or for tools, utensils, furniture, carriages, fences, ships, and the like; - usually said of felled trees, but sometimes of those standing. Cf. Lumber, 3.

‘And ta'en my fiddle to the gate, . . . And fiddled in the timber!’;

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Timbernoun

The body, stem, or trunk of a tree.

Timbernoun

Fig.: Material for any structure.

‘Such dispositions are the very errors of human nature; and yet they are the fittest timber to make politics of.’;

Timbernoun

A single piece or squared stick of wood intended for building, or already framed; collectively, the larger pieces or sticks of wood, forming the framework of a house, ship, or other structure, in distinction from the covering or boarding.

‘So they prepared timber . . . to build the house.’; ‘Many of the timbers were decayed.’;

Timbernoun

Woods or forest; wooden land.

Timbernoun

A rib, or a curving piece of wood, branching outward from the keel and bending upward in a vertical direction. One timber is composed of several pieces united.

Timberverb

To surmount as a timber does.

Timberverb

To furnish with timber; - chiefly used in the past participle.

‘His bark is stoutly timbered.’;

Timberverb

To light on a tree.

Timberverb

To make a nest.

Timbernoun

the wood of trees cut and prepared for use as building material

Timbernoun

a beam made of wood

Timbernoun

a post made of wood

Timbernoun

land that is covered with trees and shrubs

Timbernoun

(music) the distinctive property of a complex sound (a voice or noise or musical sound);

‘the timbre of her soprano was rich and lovely’; ‘the muffled tones of the broken bell summoned them to meet’;

Dunnage Illustrations

Timber Illustrations

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