VS.

Bunker vs. Fort

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Bunkernoun

(military) A hardened shelter, often buried partly or fully underground, designed to protect the inhabitants from falling bombs or other attacks.

Fortnoun

A fortified defensive structure stationed with troops.

Bunkernoun

(British) A large container or bin for storing coal, often built outside in the yard of a house. Now rare, as different types of fuels and energy sources are being used.

Fortnoun

Any permanent army post.

Bunkernoun

(nautical) A container for storing coal or fuel oil for a ship's engine. [Also, by extension] the quantity of fuel needed to replenish that container.

Fortnoun

(historical) An outlying trading-station, as in British North America.

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Bunkernoun

(rail) the coal compartment on a tank engine.

Fortverb

To create a fort, fortifications, a strong point, or a redoubt.

Bunkernoun

(golf) A sand-filled hollow on a golf course.

Fortnoun

A strong or fortified place; usually, a small fortified place, occupied only by troops, surrounded with a ditch, rampart, and parapet, or with palisades, stockades, or other means of defense; a fortification.

‘Detached works, depending solely on their own strength, belong to the class of works termed forts.’;

Bunkernoun

(paintball) An obstacle used to block an opposing player's view and field of fire.

Fortnoun

a fortified military post where troops are stationed

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Bunkernoun

(Scotland) A sort of chest or box, as in a window, the lid of which serves for a seat.

Fortnoun

a fortified defensive structure

Bunkernoun

A kitchen worktop.

Fortverb

gather in, or as if in, a fort, as for protection or defense

Bunkernoun

One who bunks off; a truant from school.

Fortverb

enclose by or as if by a fortification

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Bunkernoun

Certain fish, menhaden.

Fortverb

station (troops) in a fort

Bunkerverb

(nautical) To load a vessel with oil or coal for the engine.

Fortnoun

a fortified building or strategic position

‘the city was guarded by a ring of forts’;

Bunkerverb

(golf) To hit a golf ball into a bunker.

Fortnoun

a trading station.

Bunkerverb

(paintball) To fire constantly at a hiding opponent, preventing them from firing at other players and trapping them behind the barrier. This can also refer to eliminating an opponent behind cover by rushing the position and firing at extremely close range as the player becomes exposed.

Bunkernoun

A sort of chest or box, as in a window, the lid of which serves for a seat.

Bunkernoun

A large bin or similar receptacle; as, a coal bunker.

Bunkernoun

A small sand hole or pit, as on a golf course.

Bunkernoun

Hence, any rough hazardous ground on the links; also, an artificial hazard with built-up faces.

Bunkernoun

A fortified position dug into the ground, especially one which is closed on top and has protective walls and roof, e. g. of reinforced concrete. For defending positions it usually has windows to view the surrounding terrain, but as a safe location for planning operations or storage, a bunker may be completely underground with no direct access to the surface.

Bunkerverb

To drive (the ball) into a bunker.

Bunkernoun

a hazard on a golf course

Bunkernoun

a fortification of earth; mostly or entirely below ground

Bunkerverb

hit a golf ball into a bunker

Bunkerverb

fill (a ship's bunker) with coal or oil

Bunkerverb

transfer cargo from a ship to a warehouse

Bunker

A bunker is a defensive military fortification designed to protect people and valued materials from falling bombs or other attacks. Bunkers are mostly underground, in contrast to blockhouses which are mostly above ground.

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