Ask Difference

Deepness vs. Depth — What's the Difference?

Edited by Tayyaba Rehman — By Fiza Rafique — Updated on April 14, 2024
Deepness and depth both describe the extent of something's lower or innermost dimensions, but deepness is less commonly used and often pertains more abstractly.
Deepness vs. Depth — What's the Difference?

Difference Between Deepness and Depth

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Key Differences

Deepness refers to the abstract or metaphorical degree of intensity or complexity in contexts such as feelings or thoughts. In contrast, depth more commonly describes the physical measurement from the surface to the bottom of something, like water or a hole. This distinction makes depth suitable for scientific and everyday measurements, while deepness often appears in literary or philosophical discussions.
Depth is frequently used in technical and everyday contexts, such as in oceanography to measure sea levels, or in conversation to describe the thickness of a book. Conversely, deepness might be used in poetry or emotional expression, illustrating the intensity or profundity of feelings or artistic elements.
When discussing psychological states, deepness can describe profound or intense emotions, suggesting a vast, often unexplored inner landscape. On the other hand, depth in psychology might refer to the comprehensiveness or thoroughness of cognitive processes and understanding.
In art and literature, deepness is often employed to convey complex layers of meaning or emotion, enhancing the interpretative richness of the work. Depth, however, can refer to the visual perception of three-dimensionality in a painting or the narrative layers in a story.
Depth is quantifiable and can be measured in units such as meters or feet, providing a concrete assessment of distance or the extent of an object or space. Deepness, however, does not lend itself easily to measurement, emphasizing a more qualitative, impressionistic understanding of extent or intensity.
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Comparison Chart

Usage

More abstract, less frequent
Common, both literal and figurative

Common Contexts

Literature, emotions
Physical spaces, sciences, psychology

Measurement

Not typically measured
Often quantifiable (meters, feet)

Example Usage in Sentence

"The deepness of her sorrow was palpable."
"The depth of the lake is over 100 meters."

Implication

Intensity, complexity
Dimensionality, extent

Compare with Definitions

Deepness

The quality of being profound or intense.
The deepness of the novel's theme invites extensive analysis.

Depth

Complexity or profundity of a state or quality.
The depth of her knowledge in biology is impressive.

Deepness

Great extent downwards or inwards.
The deepness of the cave was intimidating.

Depth

Intensity of a state or emotion.
He felt the depth of his failure deeply.

Deepness

Vastness in scope or range.
The deepness of space is unfathomable.

Depth

Degree of richness or intensity in a work of art or research.
The depth of the research provides new insights into climate change.

Deepness

Severe and complex.
The crisis added a deepness to the community's struggles.

Depth

The distance from the top or surface to the bottom of something.
The depth of the pool is six feet.

Deepness

High degree of emotional or intellectual quality.
His deepness of understanding makes him a great teacher.

Depth

Lower or inner part of anything.
The depth of the forest is home to many species.

Deepness

"Deepness" is a song recorded by Japanese singer Misia. It was co-written by Misia and Jun Sasaki and produced by Misia.

Depth

The condition or quality of being deep.

Deepness

Extending far downward below a surface
A deep hole in the river ice.

Depth

The extent, measurement, or dimension downward, backward, or inward
Dove to a depth of 30 feet.
Shelves with enough depth to store the large boxes.

Deepness

Extending far inward from an outer surface
A deep cut.

Depth

The measurement or sense of distance from an observation point, such as linear perspective in painting.

Deepness

Extending far backward from front to rear
A deep walk-in refrigerator.

Depth

Often depths A deep part or place
The ocean depths.
In the depths of the forest.

Deepness

Extending far from side to side from a center
A deep yard surrounding the house.

Depth

The most profound or intense part or stage
The depth of despair.
An experience that touched the depths of tragedy.

Deepness

Far distant down or in
Deep in the woods.

Depth

Intensity; force
Had not realized the depth of their feelings for one another.

Deepness

Coming from or penetrating to a depth
A deep sigh.

Depth

The severest or worst part
In the depth of an economic depression.

Deepness

(Sports) Located or taking place near the outer boundaries of the area of play
Deep left field.

Depth

A low point, level, or degree
Production has fallen to new depths.

Deepness

Extending a specific distance in a given direction
Snow four feet deep.

Depth

Intellectual complexity or penetration; profundity
A novel of great depth.

Deepness

Far distant in time or space
Deep in the past.

Depth

The range of one's understanding or competence
I am out of my depth when it comes to cooking.

Deepness

Difficult to penetrate or understand; recondite
A deep metaphysical theory.

Depth

Strength held in reserve, especially a supply of skilled or capable replacements
A team with depth at every position.

Deepness

Of a mysterious or obscure nature
A deep secret.
Ancient and deep tribal rites.

Depth

The degree of richness or intensity
Depth of color.

Deepness

Very learned or intellectual; wise
A deep philosopher.

Depth

Lowness in pitch.

Deepness

Exhibiting great cunning or craft
Deep political machinations.

Depth

Complete detail; thoroughness
The depth of her research.
An interview conducted in great depth.

Deepness

Of a grave or extreme nature
Deep trouble.
Deepest deceit.

Depth

The vertical distance below a surface; the degree to which something is deep
Measure the depth of the water in this part of the bay.

Deepness

Very absorbed or involved
Deep in thought.
Deep in financial difficulties.

Depth

The distance between the front and the back, as the depth of a drawer or closet

Deepness

Profound in quality or feeling
A deep trance.
Deep devotion.

Depth

(figuratively) the intensity, complexity, strength, seriousness or importance of an emotion, situation, etc.
The depth of her misery was apparent to everyone.
The depth of the crisis had been exaggerated.
We were impressed by the depth of her knowledge.

Deepness

Rich and intense in shade. Used of a color
A deep red.

Depth

Lowness
The depth of a sound

Deepness

Low in pitch; resonant
A deep voice.

Depth

The total palette of available colors

Deepness

Covered or surrounded to a designated degree. Often used in combination
Waist-deep in the water.
Ankle-deep in snow.

Depth

The property of appearing three-dimensional
The depth of field in this picture is amazing.

Deepness

Large in quantity or size; big
Deep cuts in the budget.

Depth

The deepest part usually of a body of water
The burning ship finally sunk into the depths.

Deepness

(Sports) Having a sufficient number of capable reserve players
That team is not very deep.

Depth

A very remote part.
Into the depths of the jungle...
In the depths of the night,

Deepness

To a great depth; deeply
Dig deep.
Feelings that run deep.

Depth

The most severe part
In the depth of the crisis
In the depths of winter

Deepness

Well along in time; late
Worked deep into the night.

Depth

(logic) the number of simple elements which an abstract conception or notion includes; the comprehension or content

Deepness

(Sports) Close to the outer boundaries of the area of play
Played deep for the first three innings.
Ran deep into their opponents' territory.

Depth

(horology) a pair of toothed wheels which work together

Deepness

A deep place in land or in a body of water
Drowned in the deep of the river.

Depth

(aeronautics) the perpendicular distance from the chord to the farthest point of an arched surface

Deepness

A vast, immeasurable extent
The deep of outer space.

Depth

(statistics) the lower of the two ranks of a value in an ordered set of values

Deepness

The extent of encompassing time or space; firmament.

Depth

The quality of being deep; deepness; perpendicular measurement downward from the surface, or horizontal measurement backward from the front; as, the depth of a river; the depth of a body of troops.

Deepness

The most intense or extreme part
The deep of night.

Depth

Profoundness; extent or degree of intensity; abundance; completeness; as, depth of knowledge, or color.
Mindful of that heavenly loveWhich knows no end in depth or height.

Deepness

The ocean.

Depth

Lowness; as, depth of sound.

Deepness

(Nautical) A sounding that falls between marks on a lead line and thus corresponds to an estimated depth rather than a precise depth.

Depth

That which is deep; a deep, or the deepest, part or place; the deep; the middle part; as, the depth of night, or of winter.
From you unclouded depth above.
The depth closed me round about.

Deepness

The state or quality of being deep (either physically or metaphorically)

Depth

The number of simple elements which an abstract conception or notion includes; the comprehension or content.

Deepness

The state or quality of being deep, profound, mysterious, secretive, etc.; depth; profundity; - opposed to shallowness.
Because they had no deepness of earth.

Depth

A pair of toothed wheels which work together.

Deepness

Craft; insidiousness.

Depth

The perpendicular distance from the chord to the farthest point of an arched surface.

Deepness

The quality of being physically deep;
The profundity of the mine was almost a mile

Depth

The maximum number of times a type of procedure is reiteratively called before the last call is exited; - of subroutines or procedures which are reentrant; - used of call stacks.

Deepness

A low pitch that is loud and voluminous

Depth

Extent downward or backward or inward;
The depth of the water
Depth of a shelf
Depth of a closet

Depth

Degree of psychological or intellectual depth

Depth

(usually plural) the deepest and most remote part;
From the depths of darkest Africa
Signals received from the depths of space

Depth

(usually plural) a low moral state;
He had sunk to the depths of addiction

Depth

The intellectual ability to penetrate deeply into ideas

Common Curiosities

How is depth typically measured?

Depth is typically measured in units like meters or feet, indicating the distance from the surface to the bottom.

Can deepness be quantified like depth?

Unlike depth, deepness is rarely quantifiable and is more subjective in nature.

How do deepness and depth differ in literary usage?

In literature, deepness may refer to emotional or thematic complexity, whereas depth might describe narrative layers or a character's psychological dimension.

What is an example of depth in a professional setting?

An example would be describing the depth of an engineer's expertise in structural analysis.

Does deepness have a positive or negative connotation?

Deepness can have either, depending on the context, often associated with a profound or intense quality.

What might 'depth of field' refer to in photography?

'Depth of field' refers to the range of distance within a photo that appears acceptably sharp, not directly related to the depth as distance but shares the concept of extent.

What makes depth a preferred term in scientific contexts?

Depth is preferred in scientific contexts due to its measurable and quantifiable nature, making it suitable for precise descriptions.

Is depth used in everyday language more than deepness?

Yes, depth is used more frequently in both everyday and specialized language compared to the less common deepness.

Is deepness more subjective than depth?

Yes, deepness is typically more subjective and open to interpretation compared to the more objective term depth.

What is deepness commonly used to describe?

Deepness is commonly used to describe the intensity or complexity of abstract qualities, such as emotions or ideas.

Can deepness apply to physical measurements?

Although uncommon, deepness can metaphorically apply to physical measurements but is less precise than depth.

In which fields is the term depth most applicable?

Depth is widely applicable in fields such as geology, oceanography, psychology, and art critique.

Can depth and deepness be used interchangeably?

While they can sometimes be used interchangeably in casual conversation, their nuances make them distinct in more precise or technical discourse.

How does one measure the depth of a relationship?

The depth of a relationship is metaphorically measured by the level of connection and understanding between individuals, not in physical units.

How does the common usage of deepness enrich language?

The use of deepness enriches language by providing a way to express complex and profound qualities in abstract and emotional contexts.

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Author Spotlight

Written by
Fiza Rafique
Fiza Rafique is a skilled content writer at AskDifference.com, where she meticulously refines and enhances written pieces. Drawing from her vast editorial expertise, Fiza ensures clarity, accuracy, and precision in every article. Passionate about language, she continually seeks to elevate the quality of content for readers worldwide.
Tayyaba Rehman is a distinguished writer, currently serving as a primary contributor to askdifference.com. As a researcher in semantics and etymology, Tayyaba's passion for the complexity of languages and their distinctions has found a perfect home on the platform. Tayyaba delves into the intricacies of language, distinguishing between commonly confused words and phrases, thereby providing clarity for readers worldwide.

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