Curd vs. Cord - What's the difference?

Curd

Curds are a dairy product obtained by coagulating milk in a process called curdling. The coagulation can be caused by adding rennet or any edible acidic substance such as lemon juice or vinegar, and then allowing it to coagulate. The increased acidity causes the milk proteins (casein) to tangle into solid masses, or curds. Milk that has been left to sour (raw milk alone or pasteurized milk with added lactic acid bacteria) will also naturally produce curds, and sour milk cheeses are produced this way. Producing cheese curds is one of the first steps in cheesemaking; the curds are pressed and drained to varying amounts for different styles of cheese and different secondary agents (molds for blue cheeses, etc.) are introduced before the desired aging finishes the cheese. The remaining liquid, which contains only whey proteins, is the whey. In cow's milk, 90 percent of the proteins are caseins. In Indian English, used only in the Indian subcontinent, curd (or curds) is used to refer to the traditional homemade yogurt known as dahi, while paneer and Chhena are used to denote curdled milk.

Curd vs. Cord

Curd

Table of contents

1. Etymology
          3.1. Derived terms
          3.2. See also
          4.1. Derived terms

Cord

Table of contents

1. Etymology
          3.1. Synonyms

Curd

1. Etymology

From Middle English curd, a metathetic variant of Middle English crud, crudde (coagulated substance). More at crud.

2. Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kɜː(ɹ)d/
  • Rhymes: -ɜː(ɹ)d
  • Homophone: Kurd

3. Noun

curd (plural curds)

  1. The part of milk that coagulates when it sours or is treated with enzymes; used to make cottage cheese.
  2. The coagulated part of any liquid.
  3. The edible flower head of certain brassicaceous plants.
    • R. Thompson
      Broccoli should be cut while the curd, as the flowering mass is termed, is entire.
    • F. Burr
      Cauliflowers should be cut for use while the head, or curd, is still close and compact.

3.1. Derived terms

  • crud
  • curds and whey
  • lemon curd

3.2. See also

  • buttermilk
  • milk
  • whey
  • yoghurt

4. Verb

curd (third-person singular simple present curds, present participle curding, simple past and past participle curded)

  1. (intransitive) To form curd; to curdle.
  2. (transitive) To cause to coagulate or thicken; to cause to congeal; to curdle.
    • Shakespeare
      Does it curd thy blood / To say I am thy mother?

4.1. Derived terms

  • curdle

5. Anagrams

  • CRUD, crud

Cord

1. Etymology

From Old French corde, from Latin chorda, from Ancient Greek (Doric) χορδά (khordá), Ionic χορδή (khordḗ, string of gut, the string of a lyre). More at yarn and hernia.

2. Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /kɔɹd/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /kɔːd/
  • Rhymes: -ɔː(ɹ)d
  • Homophones: chord, cored, cawed (in non-rhotic accents)

3. Noun

cord (countable and uncountable, plural cords)

  1. A long, thin, flexible length of twisted yarns (strands) of fiber (rope, for example); (uncountable) such a length of twisted strands considered as a commodity.
    The burglar tied up the victim with a cord.
    He looped some cord around his fingers.
  2. A small flexible electrical conductor composed of wires insulated separately or in bundles and assembled together usually with an outer cover; the electrical cord of a lamp, sweeper ((US) vacuum cleaner), or other appliance.
  3. A unit of measurement for firewood, equal to 128 cubic feet (4 × 4 × 8 feet), composed of logs and/or split logs four feet long and none over eight inches diameter. It is usually seen as a stack four feet high by eight feet long.
    • 1851, Herman Melville, Moby-Dick
      Unerringly impelling this dead, impregnable, uninjurable wall, and this most buoyant thing within; there swims behind it all a mass of tremendous life, only to be adequately estimated as piled wood is—by the cord []
  4. (figuratively) Any influence by which persons are caught, held, or drawn, as if by a cord.
    • Tennyson
      The knots that tangle human creeds, / The wounding cords that bind and strain / The heart until it bleeds.
    • 1900, Charles W. Chesnutt, The House Behind the Cedars, Chapter I,
      Every detail of the house and garden was familiar; a thousand cords of memory and affection drew him thither; but a stronger counter-motive prevailed.
  5. (anatomy) Any structure having the appearance of a cord, especially a tendon or nerve.
    spermatic cord; spinal cord; umbilical cord; vocal cords
  6. Dated form of chord: musical sense.
  7. Misspelling of chord: a cross-section measurement of an aircraft wing.

3.1. Synonyms

  • (length of twisted strands): cable, twine
  • (wires surrounded by an insulating coating, used to supply electricity): cable, flex
  • See also Thesaurus:string

4. Verb

cord (third-person singular simple present cords, present participle cording, simple past and past participle corded)

  1. To furnish with cords
  2. To tie or fasten with cords
  3. To flatten a book during binding
  4. To arrange (wood, etc.) in a pile for measurement by the cord.

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