VS.

Classic vs. Timeless

Published:

Classicadjective

Of or relating to the first class or rank, especially in literature or art.

Timelessadjective

Eternal.

Classicadjective

Exemplary of a particular style; defining a class/category.

Timelessadjective

Not affected by time; ageless.

Classicadjective

Exhibiting timeless quality.

Timelessadjective

(obsolete) Done at an improper time; unseasonable; untimely.

ADVERTISEMENT

Classicadjective

Of or pertaining to the ancient Greeks and Romans, especially to Greek or Roman authors of the highest rank, or of the period when their best literature was produced; of or pertaining to places inhabited by the ancient Greeks and Romans, or rendered famous by their deeds.

Timelessadjective

Not decreasing over time in quality and appeal.

‘The cave carvings have a timeless beauty.’;

Classicadjective

(euphemistic) Traditional; original.

‘Users who dislike the new visual layout can return to classic mode.’;

Timelessnoun

A gene encoding an essential protein that regulates circadian rhythm, normally written in italics: timeless.

Classicnoun

A perfect and/or early example of a particular style.

Timelessadjective

Done at an improper time; unseasonable; untimely.

‘Nor fits it to prolong the heavenly feastTimeless, indecent.’;

ADVERTISEMENT

Classicnoun

An artistic work of lasting worth, such as a film or song.

Timelessadjective

Done or occurring before the proper time; premature; immature; as, a timeless grave.

‘Must I behold thy timeless, cruel death?’;

Classicnoun

The author of such a work.

Timelessadjective

Having no end; interminable; unending.

Classicnoun

A major, long-standing sporting event

Timelessadjective

unaffected by time;

‘few characters are so dateless as Hamlet’; ‘Helen's timeless beauty’;

ADVERTISEMENT

Classicnoun

(dated) One learned in the literature of Ancient Greece and Ancient Rome; a student of classical literature.

Classicadjective

Of or relating to the first class or rank, especially in literature or art.

‘Give, as thy last memorial to the age,One classic drama, and reform the stage.’; ‘Mr. Greaves may justly be reckoned a classical author on this subject [Roman weights and coins].’;

Classicadjective

Of or pertaining to the ancient Greeks and Romans, esp. to Greek or Roman authors of the highest rank, or of the period when their best literature was produced; of or pertaining to places inhabited by the ancient Greeks and Romans, or rendered famous by their deeds.

‘Though throned midst Latium's classic plains.’; ‘The epithet classical, as applied to ancient authors, is determined less by the purity of their style than by the period at which they wrote.’; ‘He [Atterbury] directed the classical studies of the undergraduates of his college.’;

Classicadjective

Conforming to the best authority in literature and art; chaste; pure; refined; as, a classical style.

‘Classical, provincial, and national synods.’;

Classicnoun

A work of acknowledged excellence and authority, or its author; - originally used of Greek and Latin works or authors, but now applied to authors and works of a like character in any language.

‘In is once raised him to the rank of a legitimate English classic.’;

Classicnoun

One learned in the literature of Greece and Rome, or a student of classical literature.

Classicnoun

a creation of the highest excellence

Classicnoun

an artist who has created classic works

Classicadjective

characteristic of the classical artistic and literary traditions

Classicadjective

adhering to established standards and principles;

‘a classic proof’;

Classic

A classic is an outstanding example of a particular style; something of lasting worth or with a timeless quality; of the first or highest quality, class, or rank – something that exemplifies its class. The word can be an adjective (a classic car) or a noun (a classic of English literature).

Popular Comparisons

Latest Comparisons

Trending Comparisons