Zink vs. Sink - What's the difference?

Wikipedia

  • Sink

    A sink — also known by other names including sinker, washbowl, hand basin and wash basin—is a bowl-shaped plumbing fixture used for washing hands, dishwashing, and other purposes. Sinks have taps (faucets) that supply hot and cold water and may include a spray feature to be used for faster rinsing. They also include a drain to remove used water; this drain may itself include a strainer and/or shut-off device and an overflow-prevention device. Sinks may also have an integrated soap dispenser. Many sinks, especially in kitchens, are installed adjacent to or inside a counter. When a sink becomes clogged, a person will often resort to use a chemical drain cleaner or a plunger, though most professional plumbers will remove the clog with a drain auger (often called a "plumber's snake").

Wiktionary

  • Zink (noun)

    A type of cornett.

  • Zink (noun)

    obsolete form of zinc

  • Sink (verb)

    To move or be moved into something.

  • Sink (verb)

    To descend or submerge (or to cause to do so) into a liquid or similar substance.

    "A stone sinks in water."

    "The sun gradually sank in the west."

  • Sink (verb)

    To cause a vessel to sink, generally by making it no longer watertight.

  • Sink (verb)

    To push (something) into something.

    "The joint will hold tighter if you sink a wood screw through both boards."

    "The dog sank its teeth into the delivery man's leg."

  • Sink (verb)

    To diminish or be diminished.

  • Sink (verb)

    To pot; hit a ball into a pocket or hole.

  • Sink (verb)

    To experience apprehension, disappointment, dread, or momentary depression.

  • Sink (verb)

    To cause to decline; to depress or degrade.

    "to sink one's reputation"

  • Sink (verb)

    To conceal and appropriate.

  • Sink (verb)

    To keep out of sight; to suppress; to ignore.

  • Sink (verb)

    To reduce or extinguish by payment.

    "to sink the national debt"

  • Sink (verb)

    To be overwhelmed or depressed; to fail in strength.

  • Sink (verb)

    To decrease in volume, as a river; to subside; to become diminished in volume or in apparent height.

  • Sink (noun)

    A basin used for holding water for washing

  • Sink (noun)

    A drain for carrying off wastewater

  • Sink (noun)

    A sinkhole

  • Sink (noun)

    A depression in land where water collects, with no visible outlet

  • Sink (noun)

    A heat sink

  • Sink (noun)

    A place that absorbs resources or energy

  • Sink (noun)

    The motion of a sinker pitch

    "Jones' has a two-seamer with heavy sink."

  • Sink (noun)

    An object or callback that captures events; event sink

  • Sink (noun)

    a destination vertex in a transportation network

Oxford Dictionary

  • Sink (verb)

    go down below the surface of something, especially of a liquid; become submerged

    "he saw the coffin sink below the surface of the waves"

  • Sink (verb)

    (of a ship) go to the bottom of the sea or some other body of water because of damage or a collision

    "the trawler sank with the loss of all six crew"

  • Sink (verb)

    cause (a ship) to sink

    "a freak wave sank their boat near the shore"

  • Sink (verb)

    fail and not be seen or heard of again

    "the film sank virtually without trace"

  • Sink (verb)

    cause to fail

    "this pledge could sink the government"

  • Sink (verb)

    conceal, keep in the background, or ignore

    "they agreed to sink their differences"

  • Sink (verb)

    descend from a higher to a lower position; drop downwards

    "you can relax on the veranda as the sun sinks low"

  • Sink (verb)

    (of a person) lower oneself or drop down gently

    "she sank back on to her pillow"

  • Sink (verb)

    gradually penetrate into the surface of something

    "her feet sank into the thick pile of the carpet"

  • Sink (verb)

    gradually decrease or decline in value, amount, quality, or intensity

    "their output sank to a third of the pre-war figure"

  • Sink (verb)

    lapse or fall into a particular state or condition

    "he sank into a coma after suffering a brain haemorrhage"

  • Sink (verb)

    approach death

    "the doctor concluded that the lad was sinking fast"

  • Sink (verb)

    insert beneath a surface

    "rails fixed in place with screws sunk below the surface of the wood"

  • Sink (verb)

    cause something sharp to penetrate (a surface)

    "the dog sank its teeth into her arm"

  • Sink (verb)

    push or thrust (an object) into something

    "Kelly stood watching, her hands sunk deep into her pockets"

  • Sink (verb)

    excavate (a well) or bore (a shaft) vertically downwards

    "they planned to sink a gold mine in Oklahoma"

  • Sink (verb)

    hit (a ball) into a hole in golf or snooker

    "he sank the black into the green pocket to secure victory"

  • Sink (verb)

    (in golf) hit the ball into the hole with (a putt or other shot)

    "he sank a four-foot birdie putt at the fifth hole"

  • Sink (verb)

    rapidly consume (an alcoholic drink)

    "English players sinking a few post-match lagers"

  • Sink (noun)

    a fixed basin with a water supply and outflow pipe

    "a sink unit with cupboard and drawers under"

    "I stood at the kitchen sink"

  • Sink (noun)

    a pool or marsh in which a river's water disappears by evaporation or percolation.

  • Sink (noun)

    a body or process which acts to absorb or remove energy or a particular component from a system

    "a heat sink"

    "the oceans can act as a sink for CO₂"

  • Sink (noun)

    short for sinkhole

  • Sink (noun)

    a place of vice or corruption

    "a sink of unnatural vice, pride, and luxury"

  • Sink (noun)

    a school or estate situated in a socially deprived area

    "the local sink school"

    "a sink estate"

Webster Dictionary

  • Zink (noun)

    See Zinc.

  • Sink (verb)

    To fall by, or as by, the force of gravity; to descend lower and lower; to decline gradually; to subside; as, a stone sinks in water; waves rise and sink; the sun sinks in the west.

  • Sink (verb)

    To enter deeply; to fall or retire beneath or below the surface; to penetrate.

  • Sink (verb)

    Hence, to enter so as to make an abiding impression; to enter completely.

  • Sink (verb)

    To be overwhelmed or depressed; to fall slowly, as so the ground, from weakness or from an overburden; to fail in strength; to decline; to decay; to decrease.

  • Sink (verb)

    To decrease in volume, as a river; to subside; to become diminished in volume or in apparent height.

  • Sink

    To cause to sink; to put under water; to immerse or submerge in a fluid; as, to sink a ship.

  • Sink

    Figuratively: To cause to decline; to depress; to degrade; hence, to ruin irretrievably; to destroy, as by drowping; as, to sink one's reputation.

  • Sink

    To make (a depression) by digging, delving, or cutting, etc.; as, to sink a pit or a well; to sink a die.

  • Sink

    To bring low; to reduce in quantity; to waste.

  • Sink

    To conseal and appropriate.

  • Sink

    To keep out of sight; to suppress; to ignore.

  • Sink

    To reduce or extinguish by payment; as, to sink the national debt.

  • Sink (noun)

    A drain to carry off filthy water; a jakes.

  • Sink (noun)

    A shallow box or vessel of wood, stone, iron, or other material, connected with a drain, and used for receiving filthy water, etc., as in a kitchen.

  • Sink (noun)

    A hole or low place in land or rock, where waters sink and are lost; - called also sink hole.

  • Sink (noun)

    The lowest part of a natural hollow or closed basin whence the water of one or more streams escapes by evaporation; as, the sink of the Humboldt River.

Princeton's WordNet

  • Sink (noun)

    plumbing fixture consisting of a water basin fixed to a wall or floor and having a drainpipe

  • Sink (noun)

    (technology) a process that acts to absorb or remove energy or a substance from a system;

    "the ocean is a sink for carbon dioxide"

  • Sink (noun)

    a depression in the ground communicating with a subterranean passage (especially in limestone) and formed by solution or by collapse of a cavern roof

  • Sink (noun)

    a covered cistern; waste water and sewage flow into it

  • Sink (verb)

    fall or drop to a lower place or level;

    "He sank to his knees"

  • Sink (verb)

    cause to sink;

    "The Japanese sank American ships in Pearl Harbor"

  • Sink (verb)

    pass into a specified state or condition;

    "He sank into Nirvana"

  • Sink (verb)

    go under,

    "The raft sank and its occupants drowned"

  • Sink (verb)

    descend into or as if into some soft substance or place;

    "He sank into bed"

    "She subsided into the chair"

  • Sink (verb)

    appear to move downward;

    "The sun dipped below the horizon"

    "The setting sun sank below the tree line"

  • Sink (verb)

    fall heavily or suddenly; decline markedly;

    "The real estate market fell off"

  • Sink (verb)

    fall or sink heavily;

    "He slumped onto the couch"

    "My spirits sank"

  • Sink (verb)

    embed deeply;

    "She sank her fingers into the soft sand"

    "He buried his head in her lap"

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