VS.

Yolk vs. York

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Yolknoun

The yellow, spherical part of an egg that is surrounded by the white albumen, and serves as nutriment for the growing young.

‘To make meringue, you have to separate the white from the yolk.’;

Yorkverb

(cricket) to bowl a yorker at a batsman, especially to get a batsman out in this way.

Yolknoun

The grease in a sheep's fleece.

Yorkverb

(slang) To vomit.

Yolknoun

The yellow part of an egg; the vitellus.

Yorknoun

the English royal house (a branch of the Plantagenet line) that reigned from 1461 to 1485; its emblem was a white rose

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Yolknoun

An oily secretion which naturally covers the wool of sheep.

York

York is a cathedral city and unitary authority area, at the confluence of the rivers Ouse and Foss, in England. The city has long-standing buildings and structures, such as a minster, castle and ancient city walls.

Yolknoun

nutritive material of an ovum stored for the nutrition of an embryo (especially the yellow mass of a bird or reptile egg)

Yolknoun

the yellow internal part of a bird's egg, which is surrounded by the white, is rich in protein and fat, and nourishes the developing embryo

‘two yolks’; ‘a mass of yolk’;

Yolknoun

the part corresponding to the yolk in the ovum or larva of all egg-laying vertebrates and many invertebrates.

Yolk

Among animals which produce eggs, the yolk (; also known as the vitellus) is the nutrient-bearing portion of the egg whose primary function is to supply food for the development of the embryo. Some types of egg contain no yolk, for example because they are laid in situations where the food supply is sufficient (such as in the body of the host of a parasitoid) or because the embryo develops in the parent's body, which supplies the food, usually through a placenta.

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