VS.

Will vs. Well

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Willverb

To wish, desire (something).

‘Do what you will.’;

Welladverb

(manner) Accurately, competently, satisfactorily.

‘He does his job well.’;

Willverb

To wish or desire (that something happen); to intend (that).

Welladverb

(manner) Completely, fully.

‘a well done steak’; ‘We’re well beat now.’;

Willverb

(auxiliary) To habitually do (a given action).

Welladverb

(degree) To a significant degree.

‘That author is well known.’;

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Willverb

(auxiliary) To choose to (do something), used to express intention but without any temporal connotations (+ bare infinitive).

Welladverb

Very (as a general-purpose intensifier).

Willverb

(auxiliary) Used to express the future tense, sometimes with some implication of volition when used in the first person. Compare shall.

Welladverb

In a desirable manner; so as one could wish; satisfactorily; favourably; advantageously.

Willverb

(auxiliary) To be able to, to have the capacity to.

‘Unfortunately, only one of these gloves will actually fit over my hand.’;

Welladjective

In good health.

‘I had been sick, but now I'm well.’;

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Willverb

(archaic) To wish, desire.

Welladjective

(hypercorrect) Good, content.

‘“How are you?” — “I'm well, thank you!”’;

Willverb

To instruct (that something be done) in one's will.

Welladjective

(archaic) Prudent; good; well-advised.

Willverb

(transitive) To try to make (something) happen by using one's will (intention).

‘All the fans were willing their team to win the game.’;

Wellinterjection

Used to acknowledge a statement or situation.

‘“The car is broken.” “Well, we could walk to the movies instead.”’; ‘“I didn't like the music.” “Well, I thought it was good.”’; ‘“I forgot to pack the tent! Well, I guess we're sleeping under the stars tonight.”’;

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Willverb

(transitive) To bequeath (something) to someone in one's will (legal document).

‘He willed his stamp collection to the local museum.’;

Wellinterjection

An exclamation of surprise, often doubled or tripled.

‘Well, well, well, what do we have here?’;

Willnoun

One's independent faculty of choice; the ability to be able to exercise one's choice or intention.

‘Of course, man's will is often regulated by his reason.’;

Wellinterjection

An exclamation of indignance.

‘Well! There was no need to say that in front of my mother!’;

Willnoun

One's intention or decision; someone's orders or commands.

‘Eventually I submitted to my parents' will.’;

Wellinterjection

Used in speech to express the overcoming of reluctance to say something.

‘It was a bit... well... too loud.’;

Willnoun

The act of choosing to do something; a person’s conscious intent or volition.

‘Most creatures have a will to live.’;

Wellinterjection

Used in speech to fill gaps; filled pause.

‘“So what have you been doing?” “Well, we went for a picnic, and then it started raining so we came home early.”’;

Willnoun

A formal declaration of one's intent concerning the disposal of one's property and holdings after death; the legal document stating such wishes.

Wellinterjection

(Hiberno-English) Used as a greeting

‘Well lads. How's things?’;

Willnoun

(archaic) That which is desired; one's wish.

Wellnoun

A hole sunk into the ground as a source of water, oil, natural gas or other fluids.

Willnoun

(archaic) Desire, longing. (Now generally merged with later senses.)

‘He felt a great will to make a pilgrimage to the Holy Land.’;

Wellnoun

A place where a liquid such as water surfaces naturally; a spring.

Willnoun

The power of choosing; the faculty or endowment of the soul by which it is capable of choosing; the faculty or power of the mind by which we decide to do or not to do; the power or faculty of preferring or selecting one of two or more objects.

‘It is necessary to form a distinct notion of what is meant by the word "volition" in order to understand the import of the word will, for this last word expresses the power of mind of which "volition" is the act.’; ‘Will is an ambiguous word, being sometimes put for the faculty of willing; sometimes for the act of that faculty, besides [having] other meanings. But "volition" always signifies the act of willing, and nothing else.’; ‘Appetite is the will's solicitor, and the will is appetite's controller; what we covet according to the one, by the other we often reject.’; ‘The will is plainly that by which the mind chooses anything.’;

Wellnoun

A small depression suitable for holding liquid or other objects.

‘Make a well in the dough mixture and pour in the milk.’;

Willnoun

The choice which is made; a determination or preference which results from the act or exercise of the power of choice; a volition.

‘The word "will," however, is not always used in this its proper acceptation, but is frequently substituted for "volition", as when I say that my hand mover in obedience to my will.’;

Wellnoun

(figurative) A source of supply.

Willnoun

The choice or determination of one who has authority; a decree; a command; discretionary pleasure.

‘Thy will be done.’; ‘Our prayers should be according to the will of God.’;

Wellnoun

(nautical) A vertical, cylindrical trunk in a ship, reaching down to the lowest part of the hull, through which the bilge pumps operate.

Willnoun

Strong wish or inclination; desire; purpose.

‘My poverty, but not my will, consents; . . . Put this in any liquid thing you will,And drink it off.’;

Wellnoun

(nautical) The cockpit of a sailboat.

Willnoun

That which is strongly wished or desired.

‘What's your will, good friar?’; ‘The mariner hath his will.’;

Wellnoun

(nautical) A compartment in the middle of the hold of a fishing vessel, made tight at the sides, but having holes perforated in the bottom to let in water to keep fish alive while they are transported to market.

Willnoun

Arbitrary disposal; power to control, dispose, or determine.

‘Deliver me not over unto the will of mine enemies.’;

Wellnoun

(nautical) A vertical passage in the stern into which an auxiliary screw propeller may be drawn up out of the water.

Willnoun

The legal declaration of a person's mind as to the manner in which he would have his property or estate disposed of after his death; the written instrument, legally executed, by which a man makes disposition of his estate, to take effect after his death; testament; devise. See the Note under Testament, 1.

Wellnoun

(military) A hole or excavation in the earth, in mining, from which run branches or galleries.

Willverb

To wish; to desire; to incline to have.

‘A wife as of herself no thing ne sholde [should]Wille in effect, but as her husband wolde [would].’; ‘Caleb said unto her, What will thou ?’; ‘They would none of my counsel.’;

Wellnoun

(architecture) An opening through the floors of a building, as for a staircase or an elevator; a wellhole.

Willverb

As an auxiliary, will is used to denote futurity dependent on the verb. Thus, in first person, "I will" denotes willingness, consent, promise; and when "will" is emphasized, it denotes determination or fixed purpose; as, I will go if you wish; I will go at all hazards. In the second and third persons, the idea of distinct volition, wish, or purpose is evanescent, and simple certainty is appropriately expressed; as, "You will go," or "He will go," describes a future event as a fact only. To emphasize will denotes (according to the tone or context) certain futurity or fixed determination.

‘I am able to devote as much time and attention to other subjects as I will [shall] be under the necessity of doing next winter.’; ‘A countryman, telling us what he had seen, remarked that if the conflagration went on, as it was doing, we would [should] have, as our next season's employment, the Old Town of Edinburgh to rebuild.’; ‘I feel assured that I will [shall] not have the misfortune to find conflicting views held by one so enlightened as your excellency.’;

Wellnoun

The open space between the bench and the counsel tables in a courtroom.

Willverb

To be willing; to be inclined or disposed; to be pleased; to wish; to desire.

‘And behold, there came a leper and worshiped him, saying, Lord if thou wilt, thou canst make me clean. And Jesus . . . touched him, saying, I will; be thou clean.’;

Wellnoun

(metalworking) The lower part of a furnace, into which the metal falls.

Willverb

To form a distinct volition of; to determine by an act of choice; to ordain; to decree.

‘By all law and reason, that which the Parliament will not, is no more established in this kingdom.’; ‘Two things he [God] willeth, that we should be good, and that we should be happy.’;

Wellnoun

A well drink.

‘They're having a special tonight: $1 wells.’;

Willverb

To enjoin or command, as that which is determined by an act of volition; to direct; to order.

‘They willed me say so, madam.’; ‘Send for music,And will the cooks to use their best of cunningTo please the palate.’; ‘As you go, will the lord mayor . . . To attend our further pleasure presently.’;

Wellnoun

(video games) The playfield of Tetris and similar video games, into which the blocks fall.

Willverb

To give or direct the disposal of by testament; to bequeath; to devise; as, to will one's estate to a child; also, to order or direct by testament; as, he willed that his nephew should have his watch.

Wellnoun

(biology) In a microtiter plate, each of the small equal circular or square sections which serve as test tubes.

Willverb

To exercise an act of volition; to choose; to decide; to determine; to decree.

‘At Winchester he lies, so himself willed.’; ‘He that shall turn his thoughts inward upon what passes in his own mind when he wills.’; ‘I contend for liberty as it signifies a power in man to do as he wills or pleases.’;

Wellverb

(intransitive) To issue forth, as water from the earth; to flow; to spring.

Willnoun

the capability of conscious choice and decision and intention;

‘the exercise of their volition we construe as revolt’;

Wellverb

(intransitive) To have something seep out of the surface.

‘Her eyes welled with tears.’;

Willnoun

a fixed and persistent intent or purpose;

‘where there's a will there's a way’;

Wellnoun

An issue of water from the earth; a spring; a fountain.

‘Begin, then, sisters of the sacred well.’;

Willnoun

a legal document declaring a person's wishes regarding the disposal of their property when they die

Wellnoun

A pit or hole sunk into the earth to such a depth as to reach a supply of water, generally of a cylindrical form, and often walled with stone or bricks to prevent the earth from caving in.

‘The woman said unto him, Sir, thou hast nothing to draw with, and the well is deep.’;

Willverb

decree or ordain;

‘God wills our existence’;

Wellnoun

A shaft made in the earth to obtain oil or brine.

Willverb

have in mind;

‘I will take the exam tomorrow’;

Wellnoun

Fig.: A source of supply; fountain; wellspring.

‘Dan Chaucer, well of English undefiled.’; ‘A well of serious thought and pure.’;

Willverb

determine by choice;

‘This action was willed and intended’;

Wellnoun

An inclosure in the middle of a vessel's hold, around the pumps, from the bottom to the lower deck, to preserve the pumps from damage and facilitate their inspection.

Willverb

leave or give by will after one's death;

‘My aunt bequeathed me all her jewelry’; ‘My grandfather left me his entire estate’;

Wellnoun

A hole or excavation in the earth, in mining, from which run branches or galleries.

Wellnoun

An opening through the floors of a building, as for a staircase or an elevator; a wellhole.

Wellnoun

The lower part of a furnace, into which the metal falls.

Wellverb

To issue forth, as water from the earth; to flow; to spring.

‘From his two springs in Gojam's sunny realm,Pure welling out, he through the lucid lakeOf fair Dambea rolls his infant streams.’;

Wellverb

To pour forth, as from a well.

Welladverb

In a good or proper manner; justly; rightly; not ill or wickedly.

‘If thou doest not well, sin lieth at the door.’;

Welladverb

Suitably to one's condition, to the occasion, or to a proposed end or use; suitably; abundantly; fully; adequately; thoroughly.

‘Lot . . . beheld all the plain of Jordan, that it was well watered everywhere.’; ‘WE are wellable to overcome it.’; ‘She looketh well to the ways of her household.’; ‘Servant of God, well done! well hast thou foughtThe better fight.’;

Welladverb

Fully or about; - used with numbers.

‘Well nine and twenty in a company.’;

Welladverb

In such manner as is desirable; so as one could wish; satisfactorily; favorably; advantageously; conveniently.

‘KnowIn measure what the mind may well contain.’; ‘All the world speaks well of you.’;

Welladverb

Considerably; not a little; far.

‘Abraham and Sarah were old and well stricken in age.’;

Welladjective

Good in condition or circumstances; desirable, either in a natural or moral sense; fortunate; convenient; advantageous; happy; as, it is well for the country that the crops did not fail; it is well that the mistake was discovered.

‘It was well with us in Egypt.’;

Welladjective

Being in health; sound in body; not ailing, diseased, or sick; healthy; as, a well man; the patient is perfectly well.

‘Is your father well, the old man of whom ye spake?’;

Welladjective

Being in favor; favored; fortunate.

‘He followed the fortunes of that family, and was well with Henry the Fourth.’;

Welladjective

Safe; as, a chip warranted well at a certain day and place.

Wellnoun

a deep hole or shaft dug or drilled to obtain water or oil or gas or brine

Wellnoun

a cavity or vessel used to contain liquid

Wellnoun

an abundant source;

‘she was a well of information’;

Wellnoun

an open shaft through the floors of a building (as for a stairway)

Wellnoun

an enclosed compartment in a ship or plane for holding something as e.g. fish or a plane's landing gear or for protecting something as e.g. a ship's pumps

Wellverb

come up;

‘Tears well in her eyes’;

Welladjective

in good health especially after having suffered illness or injury;

‘appears to be entirely well’; ‘the wound is nearly well’; ‘a well man’; ‘I think I'm well; at least I feel well’;

Welladjective

resulting favorably;

‘its a good thing that I wasn't there’; ‘it is good that you stayed’; ‘it is well that no one saw you’; ‘all's well that ends well’;

Welladjective

wise or advantageous and hence advisable;

‘it would be well to start early’;

Welladverb

(often used as a combining form) in a good or proper or satisfactory manner or to a high standard (`good' is a nonstandard dialectal variant for `well');

‘the children behaved well’; ‘a task well done’; ‘the party went well’; ‘he slept well’; ‘a well-argued thesis’; ‘a well-planned party’; ‘the baby can walk pretty good’;

Welladverb

thoroughly or completely; fully; often used as a combining form;

‘The problem is well understood’; ‘she was well informed’; ‘shake well before using’; ‘in order to avoid food poisoning be sure the meat is well cooked’; ‘well-done beef’; ‘well-satisfied customers’; ‘well-educated’;

Welladverb

indicating high probability; in all likelihood;

‘I might well do it’; ‘a mistake that could easily have ended in disaster’; ‘you may well need your umbrella’; ‘he could equally well be trying to deceive us’;

Welladverb

(used for emphasis or as an intensifier) entirely or fully;

‘a book well worth reading’; ‘was well aware of the difficulties ahead’; ‘suspected only too well what might be going on’;

Welladverb

to a suitable or appropriate extent or degree;

‘the project was well underway’; ‘the fetus has well developed organs’; ‘his father was well pleased with his grades’;

Welladverb

favorably; with approval;

‘their neighbors spoke well of them’; ‘he thought well of the book’;

Welladverb

to a great extent or degree;

‘I'm afraid the film was well over budget’; ‘painting the room white made it seem considerably (or substantially) larger’; ‘the house has fallen considerably in value’; ‘the price went up substantially’;

Welladverb

with great or especially intimate knowledge;

‘we knew them well’;

Welladverb

with prudence or propriety;

‘You would do well to say nothing more’; ‘could not well refuse’;

Welladverb

with skill or in a pleasing manner;

‘she dances well’; ‘he writes well’;

Welladverb

in a manner affording benefit or advantage;

‘she married well’; ‘The children were settled advantageously in Seattle’;

Welladverb

in financial comfort;

‘They live well’; ‘she has been able to live comfortably since her husband died’;

Welladverb

without unusual distress or resentment; with good humor;

‘took the joke well’; ‘took the tragic news well’;

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