VS.

Veranda vs. Terrace

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Verandanoun

A gallery, platform, or balcony, usually roofed and often partly enclosed, extending along the outside of a building.

Terracenoun

A platform that extends outwards from a building.

Verandanoun

An open, roofed gallery or portico, adjoining a dwelling house, forming an out-of-door sitting room. See Loggia.

‘The house was of adobe, low, with a wide veranda on the three sides of the inner court.’;

Terracenoun

A raised, flat-topped bank of earth with sloping sides, especially one of a series for farming or leisure; a similar natural area of ground, often next to a river.

Verandanoun

a porch along the outside of a building (sometimes partly enclosed)

Terracenoun

A row of residential houses with no gaps between them; a group of row houses.

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Veranda

A veranda or verandah is a roofed, open-air gallery or porch, attached to the outside of a building. A veranda is often partly enclosed by a railing and frequently extends across the front and sides of the structure.Although the form verandah is correct and very common, some authorities prefer the version without an (the Concise Oxford English Dictionary gives the version as a variant and The Guardian Style Guide says ).

‘h’; ‘h’; ‘veranda not verandah’;

Terracenoun

A single house in such a group.

Terracenoun

The standing area at a football ground.

Terracenoun

The roof of a building, especially if accessible to the residents. Often used for drying laundry, sun-drying foodstuffs, exercise, or sleeping outdoors in hot weather.

Terraceverb

To provide something with a terrace.

Terraceverb

To form something into a terrace.

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Terracenoun

A raised level space, shelf, or platform of earth, supported on one or more sides by a wall, a bank of tuft, or the like, whether designed for use or pleasure.

Terracenoun

A balcony, especially a large and uncovered one.

Terracenoun

A flat roof to a house; as, the buildings of the Oriental nations are covered with terraces.

Terracenoun

A street, or a row of houses, on a bank or the side of a hill; hence, any street, or row of houses.

Terracenoun

A level plain, usually with a steep front, bordering a river, a lake, or sometimes the sea.

Terraceverb

To form into a terrace or terraces; to furnish with a terrace or terraces, as, to terrace a garden, or a building.

‘Clermont's terraced height, and Esher's groves.’;

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Terracenoun

usually paved outdoor area adjoining a residence

Terracenoun

a level shelf of land interrupting a declivity (with steep slopes above and below)

Terracenoun

a row of houses built in a similar style and having common dividing walls (or the street on which they face);

‘Grosvenor Terrace’;

Terraceverb

provide (a house) with a terrace;

‘We terrassed the country house’;

Terraceverb

make into terraces as for cultivation;

‘The Incas terraced their mountainous land’;

Terracenoun

a level paved area next to a building; a patio

‘breakfast is served on the terrace’;

Terracenoun

each of a series of flat areas made on a slope, used for cultivation.

Terracenoun

a flight of wide, shallow steps providing standing room for spectators in a stadium, especially a soccer ground.

Terracenoun

a natural horizontal shelflike formation, such as a raised beach.

Terracenoun

a row of houses built in one block in a uniform style

‘an attractive Regency terrace’;

Terracenoun

an individual house built as part of a row

‘modern furniture looks out of place in your Victorian terrace’;

Terraceverb

make or form (sloping land) into a number of level flat areas resembling a series of steps

‘the slope had to be terraced’;

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