VS.

Title vs. Address

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Titlenoun

A prefix (honorific) or suffix (post-nominal) added to a person's name to signify either veneration, official position or a professional or academic qualification. See also :Category:Titles

Addressnoun

Direction or superscription of a letter, or the name, title, and place of residence of the person addressed.

Titlenoun

(legal) Legal right to ownership of a property; a deed or other certificate proving this.

‘a good title to an estate, or an imperfect title’;

Addressnoun

Act of addressing oneself to a person or group; a discourse or speech.

Titlenoun

In canon law, that by which a beneficiary holds a benefice.

Addressnoun

Manner of speaking to another; delivery.

‘a man of pleasing or insinuating address’;

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Titlenoun

A church to which a priest was ordained, and where he was to reside.

Addressnoun

Attention in the way one addresses a lady.

Titlenoun

The name of a book, film, musical piece, painting, or other work of art.

‘I know the singer's name, but not the title of the song.’;

Addressnoun

Skill; skillful management; dexterity; adroitness.

Titlenoun

A publication.

‘The retailer carries thousands of titles.’; ‘Buyers of the new video game console can choose from three bundled titles.’;

Addressnoun

(obsolete) Act of preparing oneself.

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Titlenoun

A section or division of a subject, as of a law or a book.

Addressnoun

A description of the location of a property, usually with at least a street name and number.

‘the President's address is 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW in Washington, D.C.’;

Titlenoun

A written title, credit, or caption shown with a film, video, or performance.

‘The titles scrolled by too quickly to read.’;

Addressnoun

(by extension) The property itself.

‘I went to his address but there was nobody there’;

Titlenoun

(bookbinding) The panel for the name, between the bands of the back of a book.

Addressnoun

(computing) A location in computer memory.

‘The program will crash if there is no valid data stored at that address.’;

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Titlenoun

The subject of a writing; a short phrase that summarizes the entire topic.

Addressnoun

(Internet) An Internet address; URL.

Titlenoun

A division of an act of Congress or Parliament.

‘Title II of the USA PATRIOT Act’;

Addressnoun

An email address

Titlenoun

(sports) The recognition given to the winner of a championship in sports.

Addressverb

To prepare oneself.

Titleverb

(transitive) To assign a title to; to entitle.

Addressverb

To direct speech.

Titlenoun

An inscription put over or upon anything as a name by which it is known.

Addressverb

To aim; to direct.

Titlenoun

The inscription in the beginning of a book, usually containing the subject of the work, the author's and publisher's names, the date, etc.

Addressverb

To prepare or make ready.

Titlenoun

The panel for the name, between the bands of the back of a book.

Addressverb

To prepare oneself; to apply one's skill or energies (to some object); to betake.

Titlenoun

A section or division of a subject, as of a law, a book, specif. (Roman & Canon Laws), a chapter or division of a law book.

Addressverb

(reflexive) To direct one’s remarks (to someone).

Titlenoun

An appellation of dignity, distinction, or preëminence (hereditary or acquired), given to persons, as duke marquis, honorable, esquire, etc.

‘With his former title greet Macbeth.’;

Addressverb

To clothe or array; to dress.

Titlenoun

A name; an appellation; a designation.

Addressverb

(transitive) To direct, as words, to (anyone or anything); to make, as a speech, petition, etc. to (any audience).

‘He addressed some portions of his remarks to his supporters, some to his opponents.’;

Titlenoun

That which constitutes a just cause of exclusive possession; that which is the foundation of ownership of property, real or personal; a right; as, a good title to an estate, or an imperfect title.

Addressverb

(transitive) To direct speech to; to make a communication to, whether spoken or written; to apply to by words, as by a speech, petition, etc., to speak to; to accost.

Titlenoun

A church to which a priest was ordained, and where he was to reside.

Addressverb

(transitive) To direct in writing, as a letter; to superscribe, or to direct and transmit.

‘He addressed a letter.’;

Titleverb

To call by a title; to name; to entitle.

‘Hadrian, having quieted the island, took it for honor to be titled on his coin, "The Restorer of Britain."’;

Addressverb

(transitive) To make suit to as a lover; to court; to woo.

Titlenoun

a heading that names a statute or legislative bill; may give a brief summary of the matters it deals with;

‘Title 8 provided federal help for schools’;

Addressverb

(transitive) To consign or intrust to the care of another, as agent or factor.

‘The ship was addressed to a merchant in Baltimore.’;

Titlenoun

the name of a work of art or literary composition etc.;

‘he looked for books with the word `jazz' in the title’; ‘he refused to give titles to his paintings’; ‘I can never remember movie titles’;

Addressverb

(transitive) To address oneself to; to prepare oneself for; to apply oneself to; to direct one's speech or discourse to.

Titlenoun

a general or descriptive heading for a section of a written work;

‘the novel had chapter titles’;

Addressverb

To direct attention towards a problem or obstacle, in an attempt to resolve it.

Titlenoun

the status of being a champion;

‘he held the title for two years’;

Addressverb

To refer a location in computer memory.

Titlenoun

a legal document signed and sealed and delivered to effect a transfer of property and to show the legal right to possess it;

‘he signed the deed’; ‘he kept the title to his car in the glove compartment’;

Addressverb

To get ready to hit (the ball on the tee).

Titlenoun

an identifying appellation signifying status or function: e.g. Mr. or General;

‘the professor didn't like his friends to use his formal title’;

Addressverb

To aim; to direct.

‘And this good knight his way with me addrest.’;

Titlenoun

an established or recognized right;

‘a strong legal claim to the property’; ‘he had no documents confirming his title to his father's estate’; ‘he staked his claim’;

Addressverb

To prepare or make ready.

‘His foe was soon addressed.’; ‘Turnus addressed his men to single fight.’; ‘The five foolish virgins addressed themselves at the noise of the bridegroom's coming.’;

Titlenoun

(usually plural) written material introduced into a movie or TV show to give credits or represent dialogue or explain an action;

‘the titles go by faster than I can read’;

Addressverb

Reflexively: To prepare one's self; to apply one's skill or energies (to some object); to betake.

‘These men addressed themselves to the task.’;

Titlenoun

an appellation signifying nobility;

‘`your majesty' is the appropriate title to use in addressing a king’;

Addressverb

To clothe or array; to dress.

‘Tecla . . . addressed herself in man's apparel.’;

Titlenoun

an informal right to something;

‘his claim on her attentions’; ‘his title to fame’;

Addressverb

To direct, as words (to any one or any thing); to make, as a speech, petition, etc. (to any one, an audience).

‘The young hero had addressed his players to him for his assistance.’;

Titleverb

give a title to

Addressverb

To direct speech to; to make a communication to, whether spoken or written; to apply to by words, as by a speech, petition, etc., to speak to; to accost.

‘Are not your orders to address the senate?’; ‘The representatives of the nation addressed the king.’;

Titleverb

designate by an identifying term;

‘They styled their nation `The Confederate States'’;

Addressverb

To direct in writing, as a letter; to superscribe, or to direct and transmit; as, he addressed a letter.

Titlenoun

the name of a book, composition, or other artistic work

‘the author and title of the book’;

Addressverb

To make suit to as a lover; to court; to woo.

Titlenoun

a caption or credit in a film or broadcast

‘Rumbelows will get exclusive sponsorship with opening and closing titles’;

Addressverb

To consign or intrust to the care of another, as agent or factor; as, the ship was addressed to a merchant in Baltimore.

Titlenoun

a book, magazine, or newspaper considered as a publication

‘the company publishes 400 titles a year’;

Addressverb

To prepare one's self.

Titlenoun

a name that describes someone's position or job

‘Leese assumed the title of director general’;

Addressverb

To direct speech.

‘Young Turnus to the beauteous maid addrest.’;

Titlenoun

a word such as Lord or Dame that is used before someone's name, or a form that is used instead of someone's name, to indicate high social or official rank

‘he will inherit the title of Duke of Marlborough’;

Addressnoun

Act of preparing one's self.

Titlenoun

a word such as Mrs or Dr that is used before someone's name to indicate their profession or marital status

‘the title Professor is reserved for one or two members of a department’;

Addressnoun

Act of addressing one's self to a person; verbal application.

Titlenoun

a descriptive or distinctive name that is earned or chosen

‘the restaurant deserved the title of Best Restaurant of the Year’;

Addressnoun

A formal communication, either written or spoken; a discourse; a speech; a formal application to any one; a petition; a formal statement on some subject or special occasion; as, an address of thanks, an address to the voters.

Titlenoun

the position of being the champion of a major sports competition

‘Davis won the world title for the first time in 1981’;

Addressnoun

Direction or superscription of a letter, or the name, title, and place of residence of the person addressed.

Titlenoun

a right or claim to the ownership of property or to a rank or throne

‘the buyer acquires a good title to the goods’; ‘a grocery family had title to the property’;

Addressnoun

Manner of speaking to another; delivery; as, a man of pleasing or insinuating address.

Titlenoun

(in church use) a fixed sphere of work and source of income as a condition for ordination.

Addressnoun

Attention in the way one's addresses to a lady.

Titlenoun

a parish church in Rome under a cardinal.

Addressnoun

Skill; skillful management; dexterity; adroitness.

Titleverb

give a name to (a book, composition, or other work)

‘a report titled The Lost Land’;

Addressnoun

(computer science) the code that identifies where a piece of information is stored

Title

A title is one or more words used before or after a person's name, in certain contexts. It may signify either generation, an official position, or a professional or academic qualification.

Addressnoun

the place where a person or organization can be found or communicated with

Addressnoun

the act of delivering a formal spoken communication to an audience;

‘he listened to an address on minor Roman poets’;

Addressnoun

the manner of speaking to another individual;

‘he failed in his manner of address to the captain’;

Addressnoun

a sign in front of a house or business carrying the conventional form by which its location is described

Addressnoun

written directions for finding some location; written on letters or packages that are to be delivered to that location

Addressnoun

the stance assumed by a golfer in preparation for hitting a golf ball

Addressnoun

social skill

Addressverb

speak to;

‘He addressed the crowd outside the window’;

Addressverb

give a speech to;

‘The chairman addressed the board of trustees’;

Addressverb

put an address on (an envelope, for example)

Addressverb

direct a question at someone

Addressverb

address or apply oneself to something, direct one's efforts towards something, such as a question

Addressverb

greet, as with a prescribed form, title, or name;

‘He always addresses me with `Sir'’; ‘Call me Mister’; ‘She calls him by first name’;

Addressverb

access or locate by address

Addressverb

deal with verbally or in some form of artistic expression;

‘This book deals with incest’; ‘The course covered all of Western Civilization’; ‘The new book treats the history of China’;

Addressverb

speak to someone

Addressverb

adjust and aim (a golf ball) at in preparation fo hitting

Addressnoun

the particulars of the place where someone lives or an organization is situated

‘they exchanged addresses and agreed to keep in touch’;

Addressnoun

the place where someone lives or an organization is situated

‘our officers called at the address’;

Addressnoun

a string of characters which identifies a destination for email messages or the location of a website.

Addressnoun

a binary number which identifies a particular location in a data storage system or computer memory

‘a numerical value which acts as a storage address for the data’;

Addressnoun

a formal speech delivered to an audience

‘an address to the European Parliament’;

Addressnoun

a person's manner of speaking to someone else

‘his address was abrupt and unceremonious’;

Addressnoun

courteous or amorous approaches to someone

‘he persecuted her with his addresses’;

Addressnoun

skill, dexterity, or readiness

‘he rescued me with the most consummate address’;

Addressverb

write the name and address of the intended recipient on (an envelope, letter, or parcel)

‘I addressed my letter to him personally’;

Addressverb

speak to (a person or an assembly)

‘she addressed the open-air meeting’;

Addressverb

name someone (in the specified way) when talking to them

‘she addressed my father as ‘Mr Stevens’’;

Addressverb

say or write remarks or a protest to

‘address your complaints to the Trading Standards Board’;

Addressverb

think about and begin to deal with (an issue or problem)

‘a fundamental problem has still to be addressed’;

Addressverb

take up one's stance and prepare to hit (the ball)

‘ensure that your weight is evenly spread when you address the ball’;

Address

An address is a collection of information, presented in a mostly fixed format, used to give the location of a building, apartment, or other structure or a plot of land, generally using political boundaries and street names as references, along with other identifiers such as house or apartment numbers and organization name. Some addresses also contain special codes, such as a postal code, to make identification easier and aid in the routing of mail.

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